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Book 250 1953 US Dept of Interior Geological Survey with Maps pg 1-81UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR GEOLOGICAL SURVEY Map Iniormation Office STATUS OF HORIZONTAL CONTROL Second Edition . The accompanying index map shows the extent of horizontal control - triangulation and tran�it traverse - established by Federal agencies in tne United States, its Territories and posaession�, as contained in the records of the Map Information Office. It has been prepared for the use of Federal and State agencies, surveyors and engi- neers in private practice, and the general public, in ascertaining the existence and availability of such data. This map will be periodically revised as additional data f'rom new surveys become available. COAST AND GEODETIC SURVEY In addition to its responsibility in providing charta o� the coastal waters one of the major functions of the Coast and Geodetic Survey is the establiahment of a network o� triangulation covering the United States. With the completion of sever-a.l transcontinental triangulation ares the need for a standard datum became apparent. In view oi its posi- tion at the intersect3on of what was then the main east-west and north- south ares "Meades Ranch" triangulation station in Kansas was selected as a suitable origin for the standard datum of the United States. Succeasive general adjustments of the triangulation net have reaulted in the U. S. Standard Datum, the IQorth American Datum, and finally the North American Datum of 1927. All horizontal control established by Federal agencies has been, or is being, adjuated to conform to the �g27 a.atum. The position of "Meades Ranch" station, however, was not changed by these'adjustments. The Coast Survey publishes the results of its work in special bulletins, and state �ndex maps are availa,ble which show the location of all triangulation stations and transit-tr�verae lines. Values are expressed in both geodetic and plane coordinates - the latter based on the various zonea coffiputed for each state. All requeats for data estab- lished by thia bureau should be addressed to the Director, U. S. Coast and Geodetic Survey, Washington 25, D. C. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY Horizontal control surveys by the Geological Survey are extended from the Coast and Geodetic Survey net primarily for use in topographic mapping. Either triangula�ion or transit traverse methods are used depend- ing upon the nature of the terrain. �The results �f these surveys are expreased in geodetic coordinates. For some areas, plane coordinatea bgsed upon the varioua zonea computed for e�ch atate are available. The data are assembled and published in 15-minute quadrangle units. In order that its horizontal control data will con,form to the North American Datum of 1927 the Geological Survey has, over a period of years, been readjusting its control net. Application of the resulting corrections involves a considerable amount of work and, in many areas, the addition of new surveys requires the readjustment of existing data. If the refinements of the lateat adjustments are needed, it is essential that the requests for this control data be restricted to specific areas needed to meet current requirements. If this is done, such requests can usually be fille& promptly. Requests for Geological Survey co�trol data ahould be addressed to the Ma.p Information Office or the appropriate regional office� STATE INDEX MAPS The lo�ation of horizontal control surveys is shown in more detail on a series of atate mapa, in sheets approximately 18 by 2�+ inchea, generally on a scale oi 1:500,000. The number o� sheeta required to cover a state depends on the size of the state. Photostat copy of these indexes may be obtained for $1 per aheet from the appropriate regional office or from the Map Information Office as indicated below. Prepayment is required and may be made by money order or check, payable to the Treasurer of the United Statea, or in cash - the exact amoUnt - at the aender's risk. State Arizona California Hawaii Idaho Nevada Oregon Utah Washington Alaska Colorado Montana New Mexico Texas Wyoming Arkansas Illinois Iowa Kansas Louisiana �Sichigan Minnesota Sheets 9 1�+ 0 8 9 8 7 7 0 8 15 12 17 8 � � �F 6 � 8 6 PACIFIC REGION Available from Pacif ic Region Engineer Topographic Division U. S. Geological Survey Sacramento, California ROCKY MOUNTAIN REGION Rocky Mountain Region Engineer Topographic Division U. S. Geological Survey Federal Center Denver� Colorado CENTRAL REGION -2- Central Region Engineer Topographic Division U. S. Geological Survey Rolla, Missouri . State Missouri Nebraska North Dakota Oklahoma South Dakota Wisconain Alabama Connecticut Delaware Dist. of Col. Florida Georgia Indiana Kentucky Maine Msryland Massachusetts Miasissippi New Hampshire New Jersey New York North Carolina Ohio Pennsylvania Puerto Rico Rhode Island South Carolina Tennessee Vermont V irginia West Virginia Sheets 6 6 � 5 � 6 � 2 1 0 6 � 3 3 � 4 3 � 2 3 � � 3 3 0 1 3 � 1 � 3 CENTRAL REGION (Continued) ATLANTIC REGION Map Information Office U. S. Geological Survey Washington 25, D. C. OTHER FEDERAL AGENCIES Also shown on the index map are aurveys established by the Corps of EYlgineers, Bureau of Reclamation, Foreat Service, and the Tennesaee Valley Authority, which are usually tied into nets established either by the Coast and Geodetic Survey or the Geological Survey. Further inPormation pertaining to the availability of this control can be obtained from the Map Information OPfice or the individual agencies listed below: Office Chiei of Engineers Corps of Engineers Washington 25, D. C. -3 - Bureau o� Reclamation Department Of the Interior Washington 25, D. C. . Forest Service Maps and Surveys Brarich Department of A�iculture Tennesaee Valley Authority Washington 25� D. C. Chattanooga, Tennessee In the preparation of thia index map, the Geolagical S�,trvey has made every efiort to show all data reported by Federal agencies. During the period of reconnaissance surveys beginning in the early seventies and extending up until about 1900, very fe�r stations were monumented. Most surveys since that time have been ' uniformly monumented. However, many of these marks have been dam- a�ed or destroyed, and it is likely that the usefulness of the older data has diminished considerably. Any reports pertaining to the con- dition of these marks will greatly aid the Map Information Of'f ice and the respective agencies in maintaining their records and improving this service. The Map Iniormation Off ice will appreciate being advised as to the omission of d.ata which should have be�n included in this edition as well as information pertaining to data for inclusion in future editions. January 1952 INT.-DUP. SEC., WASH., D.C.?5947 UNITED STATES DEPARTN�!'I°F OF"' T� I19'I'ERIOR �EOLOGICAL SURVE�f i�'!AP INFORMATIaN OF`E"I�E SHADED 3�E LIEF MAP S LwT�. Ax��cl.ca� P��:k, A��� o �.l��r�a. CxPee�, Iaga e Alt.ae�.9 1'S �-�' Biack �a�res� o�' th� �`�nieon Ri�t E 1 o Mon o, Co10 a Cav� �ra. Racky I110 _K� e� Cha��asnor�g�.9 Tenn a Cl�t��.�.��, Wo �Taa� Cx°�,�af'c�°�, � No�ch, 1Q � H o I3e1�.�r�°ep Miche �n�r� i�txn-�t�.n A�ea, colo 0 Ilp��,��. Ta��� I�at3a�l Mom�enty k�o 0 1}u�r�.�s,n B�x��e, Ox°�go �pi��. x� � -v� � �a.'�E O�' S�1'iVBy �-g�3� I��`� 1.;?�0 1.y3�-�c� 1��.�-2� �.9� �9�0-21 �9�6 1953� 1950� 1933 ��� e 19�� ) �9�6 �gl��a� �x�e�.� S��r Mtns o Ftat ° 1 � Park & Vi� e, ( Team o-N o C a) �9�9 Han�� Ro�k9 Wa Vao* 1916-21 �IOl.d.�31.y W�LB�. � xo�aa.x°d., P� � � I�°ontcua9 Mo 0 Ka�sl�x°9 Goio 0 z�.r����o�9 � � z o Lock Hav��y P�.a� N1a,r�av�l�, Ut�h NL�.1ton, P� a� Monument Sp�in�9 Teacas°� �ld Sneck i++�untai.n9 Maine Og°bisani�t,s P�,o Phil�.psbtu°g9 Pao� Pox°-��,g� 9 Mara� o Pot�svil�.�, Pa� o Ron��ver��9 Vae - Wo Vao* S�.n�� Fe, N o Mex o Sod� Spx°ings, Icl.�ho st��sbu�g9 �rr� o T�r�on�9 Pao� W�,1clt°on, Ax°k o 4ihite S�.tl.pk�ur Sps°ings, Wo Vao� Wil1.i�.anspox°�s P�a� Yosemits V�,11ey, Calif o xit�.11ea°, Mao - wo vao �9� I.921 �9�3°'� �.9�+5 lg��. -�+2 �9�1 193i-�+-�+5 1922 19�g-2o �-9�3 �939 �.920 �.9�8 �9��+ zg�o-�1 �953�' 19�6-�+8 19'�7 ' 1921 �9�7-39 �9?� 192�. 1.90� (Rexo 3�-36) �953�' MIO 29 Feb�ax°y 195� ���� 1e62y5�30 102�9000 io6�9500 1o2�,OQ0 1e629�00 1 e ��+� 000 1e6�,5ao 1:62,�00 �r t 2�y 000 �:i9a�o8o io�98o0 1, 0 62, j00 ie�49oo0 �. a ��5,000 la6?,�o0 10629500 �. 062, 5oa. �.e6�y5oo le2�y0J0 10�19680 1�6�,500 �e62p5oo �a62y5oo 1:629500 1:62p500 1e6295o0 10629�00 ie62�5o0 i e ��+9 aoo 1�E� �n0 a. o �� y o�o 1e6295o0 1a62�5o0 1.e628�00 �0629500 10629�00 � o CJ� q �L�'lJ lo2�a0�0 102�9000 � �� �o� 20c 20� 35� 20c 20� 20� 20c �o� �o� 2�c 20c 20� �o� 20� 20� 20C �o� 20c 2OC �o� �o� 20c 20c 20c �o� �o� 20� �c� �oc �o� �o� 20� 20c 2oc 20c �oc 25c 20� Shaded �°c1ie� �.ps issued 3n rec�� �ea�s have been ���d by iffipro�ed tec%iqu�� �i�h gf�e e� re�.listic pr�ota°a,yal o� phys3ograph%c iea���� a This a°e13ei skia�zag 3n colors gives th� anap the �,ppea�°�nce o� a�o,a;el o� teh� �°ea .�nd mal�ee t.he �on�i��.�io�. of �he �uua��.ce �anox�e readily ap�x°ent ;�o tmhe general map �s�a° o �E�°13.e�° �ciitfc�a oi �he ah�.d,ed re7�.e� ser�e�y �x^intcdl � xau°ious tone t�aisi�i�� aa� co.lox°s, �ex°� mad.e expe�imen'ta.11� u� �o �.'�ut 19��e °�'Da�e of" edi��.on � UNITED STATES � DEPARTMENT OF TI� INTERIOR GEOLOGICAL SURVEY Map Information Office STATUS OF VERTICAL CONTROL Second Edition . The accompanying index map showa the extent of vertical control, or "levels", established by Federal agencies in the United States, its Territories and possessions, as contained in the records of the Map Information Office. It has been prepared for the use of Federal and State age,ncies, surveyors and engineers in private practice, and the general public, in ascertaining the existance and availability of such data. This map will be periodicall;r revised as additional data from new surveys become available. In order to reier all elevations to a common plane or reference the Mean Sea Level Datum, as defined by the General Adjustment of 1929, was adopted as standard. A11 vertical control estab- lished by Federal agencies has been, or can be, adjusted to conform to thia datu.m. COAST AND GEODETIC SURVESC One of the primary functions of the Coast and Geodetic Survey is the establishment of a network of first and second-order levels, based on tide gages located at convenient points along the Atlantic, Pacific, and Gulf coasts. The Coast and Geodetic Survey publishea the results of its work in special bulletins and state index maps are available which show the location of level lines. All requests for data established by this bureau should be addressed to the Director, U. S. Coast and Geodetic Survey, Washington 25, D. C. GEOLOGICAI, SURVEY From the network of first or second-order levels established by the Coast and Geodetic Survey, the Geological Survey extends leveling, generally of third-order accuracy, which serves primarily for use in topo�raphic mapping. The results of these surveys are �aduslly being adjusted to the Mean Sea Level Datum of 1929. The data are assembled and publis;�ed in 15-minute quadrangle units. STATE INDEX MAPS The location of vertical control surveys of the Geological SLsvey is shown in more detail on a series of state maps, in sheets oi approximately 18 by 2�+ inches, generally on a scale of 1:500,000. The number of sheets required to cover a state depends on the size of the state. Photostat copy of these indexes may be obtained for $1 per sheet from the appropriate regional office or from the Map Information Office as indicated on the next page. Prepayment is required and may be made b y money order or check, paya.ble to the Treasurer of the'United States, or in ca�h - the exact amount - at the aender's risk. State Arizona California Hawaii Idaho Nevada Ore gon utali Washington Alaska Colorado Montana New Mexico Texas Wyoming Arksnsas Illinois Iowa Kansas Louisiana Michigan Minnesota Missouri Nebraska North Dakota Oklahoma South Dakota Wisconsin Alabama Connecticut Delaware Diat. of Col. Florida Georgia Sheets 9 1�+ 0 8 9 S 7 7 0 8 15 12 17 8 � � � 6 4 8 6 6 6 � 5 � 6 �F 2 1 0 6 � PACIFIC REGION Available from Pacific Region Engineer Topo�aphic Division U. S. Geological Survey Sacramento, California ROCKY MOUNTAIN REGION CENTRAL REGION ATLANTIC REGION -2- Rocky Mountain Region Engineer Topographic ISivision U . S . Geological S�rvey Federal Center Denver, Colorado Central Region E�igineer Topographic Division U. S. Geological Survey Rolla, Missouri Map Information OfPice U. S. Geological Survey Washington 2�j, D. C. . State Indiaria Kentucky Maine Maryland Massachusetts Mississippi New Haucpshire New Jersey New York North Carolina Ohio Pennsylvania Puerto Rico Rhode Island South Carolina Tennesaee Vermont Virginia West Virginia Sheets 3 3 4 � 3 � 2. 3 �F � 3 3 0 1 3 �+ 1 � 3 ATLANTIC REGION (Continued) OTHER FEDERAL AGENCIES Also shown on the index map are surveys established by the Corps of Engineera, Bureau of Reclamation, Forest Service, and the Tenneasee Valley Authority, which are usually tied into nets established either by the Coast and Geodetic Survey or the Geological Survey. Further iniorma- tion pertaining to the availability of this control can be obtained from the Map Information Office, or from the individual agencies'listed below: Office Chief of ESngineers Corps of Engineers Washin�ton 25, D. C. Forest Service Department of Agriculture Washington 25, D. C. Bureau of Reclamation Department of the Interior Washington 25, D. C. Maps and Surveys Branch Tenneasee Valley Authority Chattanooga, Tennessee In the preparation of this index map, the Geological Survey has made every effort to show all data reported by Federal agencies. However, many of the bench ma,rks established in the past may have been damaged or destroyed and it is likely that the usefulness of the older data has dimin- ished considerably. Any reports pertaining to the condition of these marke will greatly aid the Map InPormation OPf ice and the respective agencies in maintaining their recorda and improving this service. The Map InYormation Office will appreciate being advised as tb the on�ission of data which should have been included in thia edition as well as information pertaining to data for inclusion in future editions. JaT1U8rY 1752 '3- INT.-DUP. SEC., WASH., D.C.;�s��5 . UNITED STATES v, DEPARTM�NT OF THE INTERIOR � GEOLOGICAL SURVEY � GEOLOUIC AND WATER-SUPPLY REPORTS ON � ARKANSAS [To �,vcuinp:�iiy Yoliograpliic indc�x inap] Jaiivar� 1953 The following reports relate to the geoloyy, and to the mineral and water resources of Arkansas. Ar� asterisk. (*) indicates that the report is cut of print, but many such reports are available for consultation in certain libraries. (See list on p. 4). The publicati.ons for which the price is stated are sold by the Superintendent of Documents, Gov- ernment Printing Office, Washington 25, D. C. Remittar,ce to that official should be made by postal money order, express order, or check; postage stamps will ciot be accepted. If additionr�l references to geologic information in this area are required they may t;e obtained from "Bibliography of North American geoloyy, " published as Bulletins 746, 747, 823, 937, 93�3, 949, 952, 958, 96�3, arid 977. ANNUAI, REPORTS: *E,ighteenth, 1S96-97. Part I contains: Triangulation and spirit leveling, by H. M. Wilson and others, pp. 131- 422. *Nineteenth, 1897-98. Part I contains: Triangulation and spirit leveling, by H. M. ��Vilson and others, pp. 145- 408. *Twentieth, 1898-99. Part I contains: Triangulation and spirit leveling, by H. M. Wilson and others, pp. 211- 530. *Twenty-first, 1899-1900. Part I contains: Triangulation, primary traverse, and spirit 1eveling, bj� H. M. Wilsor. and others, pp. 205-582. Part II contains: Preliminary report on the Camden coal field of south- western Arkansas, by J. A. Taff, pp. 313-329. Part III contains: Arkansas ba�ite depo�its, by C. W. Hayes, pp. 473-485. *Twenty-second, 1900-01. Part III contains: Southwestern coal field, by J. A. Taff, pp. 367-413; Cha1k of southwestern Arkansas, by J. A. Taff, pp. 687- 142. MONOGRAPH: *39. Eccene and lower 0ligocene coral faunas ef the United States, by 'P. W. Vaughan. 1900. 263 pp. GEOLOGIC FOLIOS: - *119. Fayetteville, Ark. -Mo. , by G. I. Adams and E. O. Ulrich. 1905. 6�7p. , 2 maps. *122. Tahlequah, Ind. T. (Okla. )-Ark. , by J. A. Taff. 1905. 7 pp. , 3 maps. *154. VJinslow, Ark. -Ind. 'P. (Okla. ), by A. H. Purdue. 1907. 6, [ 1] pp. , 2 maps. *202. Eureka Springs-Harrison, Ark. -Mo. , by A. F3. Purdue and F3. D. Miser. 1916. 22 pp. , 2 sheets of illus. , 4 maps. *215. Hot Springs, Ark. , by A. H. Purdue and H. D. Miser. 1523. 12, [ 1] pp. , 1 sheet of i11us. , 3 maps. PROFESSIONAL PAPERS: *24. Zinc and lead deposits of northern Arkansas, by G. I. Adams and others. 1904. 118 pp. � �*46. Geology and underground water resources of northern Louisiana and southern Arkansas, by A. C. Veatch. 1906. 422 pp. *91. The lower:Eocene floras of southeastern North America, by E. W. Berry. 1916. 481 pp. *95. Shorter contributions to general geology, 1915. Contains: Erosion intervals in the Eocene of the Mis- sissippi embayment, by E. W. Berry, pp. 73-82. 154. The shorter ccntributions to general geology, 1928. 299 pp. $1. 50. Contains: rauna of the middle Boone near Eiatesville, Ark., by G. H. Girty, pp. 73-103; Water-iaid volcanic rocks of early Upper Cretaceous age in southwestern Arkansas, southeastern Oklahoma, and northeastern Texas, by C. S. Ross and others, pp. 175-202. 186-B. Fossil flora of the Wedington sandstone member of the Fayetteville shale, by David White. 1937. pp. 13- 41. lOc. *186-C. Fossil plants from the Stanley shale and 7ackfork sandstone in southeastern Oklahoma and western Ark- ansas, by David White. 1937. pp. 43-67. 221-A. The foraminiferal fauna of the Upper Cretaceous Arkadelphia marl of Arkansas, by J. A. Gushman. 1949. pp. 1-19. 40c. 221-E. Geology of the Fort Smith district, Ark., by T. A. Hendricks and Bryan Parks. 1950. pp. 67-94. $1. BULLETINS: *55. Report of work done in tYie division of chemistry and physics, mainly during 1886-7. Contains: Meteorites from Johnson County, Ark. , and A11en County, Ky. , by J. E. Whitfield, pp. 63-64. *124. Revision of the American fossil cockroaches, with description of new forms, by S. H. Scudder. 1895. 176 pp. E3UL:I,i?`T'INS--Continued *213. Contributicns tu ec�un�mic ��E�o1c:�y�, 1,� �:. Cc,n�,i_ns: er:� �_iu3 1«��a�.i u� �`-t., ,r' ,i�,rthe r�ri Arl,�+n. a.�, Y'; G.,I. Adams, pp. 1b7-196; AspYialt deposits of Yike; Coutitg, Ar�.., Y;y U. i�'. Hayes, pp. 3:i3- ;f�����. *225. Contributions to economic geoloyy, 1903. Contains: Notes on Arkansas roofing slates, t;;� T. N. Z�ale, pp. 414-416. *258. The origin of certain place names in the United States (2d edition), by Henry Gannett. 1905. 334 pp. *285. Contributions to ecoriomic geolcgy, 1905. Contains: C1ays of Garland C�;unty, Ark. , by E. C.. Ecl:f�i, pp. 407-410. *315. Contributions to economic geol�gy, 1506, Part I. Ccntains: Developed phosphate deposit� of nortl�csn Arkansas, by A. H. Purdue, pp. 463-473. *316. Contributions to economic geology, 1906, Part II. Contair:s: The Arkansas coal field, by A. J. C�11;E-,•, pp. 137-160. *326. The Arkansas coal field, by A. J. Collier, with reports on the palecntology, by David V��hite and G. H. Girty. 1907. 158 pp. *340. Ccntributions to econor�iic geology, 1907, Part I. Contains: The Arl ��n ��sa �ntirriuriy iF��-.�:,��t.,, k�y F. L. Fiess, pp. 241-252. *351. The clays of Arkansas, by J. C. Branner. 1508. 247 pp. *427. PJianganese deposits of the United States, by E. C. Harder. 1910. `�'�+ ! F 7. *430. Ceritributions to economic geology, 1909, Part I. Contains: Slates ��� Ar�:amtiao, l:; A. F3. I��ur�luE�, pp. 317-334. *439. The fauna of the Moorefield Shale of Arkansas, by G. H. Girty. l��all. 148 � C• *494. The N�w Ivladrid earthquake, by I�7. L. r uller. 1912. 119 pp. *522. Portland cement materials and industry in the United States, by E. C. EcYe1 and ��therti. 191.3. 4C�1 X��.p. *530. Contributions to econornic geology, 1911, Fart I. Contains:. Developed de�osits oi full�r's earth in Arkansas, by H. D. P✓Iiser, pp. 207-219. *540. Contributions to economic geolcgy, 1912, Part I. Contains: New areas ef diamond-bearing peridot�t� in Arkansas, by H. D. PJIiser, pp. 534-546. *541. Contributions to economic geolcgy, 1912, Part II. Contains: Structure of the Fort Smith-Poteau gas field, Ark. -Okla. , by C. D. Smith, pp. 23-33. *586. �late in the United States, by T. Pd. Da1e and others. 1914. 220 pp. *593. The fauna of the Batesville sandstone of northern Ark�nsas, by G. H. Girty. 191E��. 1 i0 p��. *595, r auna of the so-called Boone chert near Batesville, Ark. , by G. H. Girty. 1915, 45 ��p. *598. Faunas of the Boone limestone at St. Joe, Ark., by G. tI. Girty. 1915. 5� pp. *624. Useful minerals of the United States, by F. C. Schrader and other:,. l��lE!. �1�1 �����. *636. Spirit leveling in Arkansas, 1896-1915. 56 pp. *659. Cannel coal in the United States, by C. H. AsYiley. 191�3. 127 pp. *660. Contributions to economic geology, 1917, Part I. Contains: Notes oii the gz�F�en:,,�r,d dE+l,u:,it: cf thE� eastern United States, by G. H. Ash1Py, pp. 2'7-49; Manganese deposits of the Caddo GaF� and De Queen quadrangles, Ark., by H. D. Miser, pp. 59-122. *690. Contributions to economic geclogy, 1918, Part I. Ccntains: Gravel deposits cf Caddo Gap and De �ueeti qua.drangles, Ark. , by H. D. Miser and A. F3. Purclue, pp. 15-30. *691. Contributions to economic geology, 1918, Part II. Contains: Asphalt dep��sits an�3 oil c��ndition:: in s��uth- western Arkansas, by H. D. Miser and A. H. Purdue, op. 271-252. *697. Gypsum deposits of the United States, by R. J�'. Stone anc� others. 1920. 326 pp. *708. High-grade clays of the eastern United States, with notes cn : ome western clay:,, k��y H. F�ie�:; ,�nd nther:>. 1922. 314 pp. *`�15. Contributions to econorriic geology, 1920, F�art I. Contains: Prelimin-iry repori os tYie dE�pc:�it:� �f manganese ore in the Batesville dietrict, Ark., k,y H. D. Miser, np. 93-124. *734. Deposits of rnanganese ore in the F3atesville di:�trict, Ar�:. , by H. D. Miser. 1923. 273 pp. *735. Contributions to economic geolcgy, 1922, Part I. Contains: Peridotite dikes in Scott County, Ark., b� H. D. Miser and C. S. Ross, pp. 271-278; Diamond-be�aring peridotite in Pike County, Ark. , by H. D. Miser and C. S. Ross, pp. 279-322. *736. Contributions to economic geology, 1922, P3rt II. Cont,�ins: Stratigraphy of the F1 Dorado oil field, Ark. , as determined by dri11 cuttings, by James Gilluly an3 K. C. Hea1d, pp. 241-254. *808. Geology of the De Queen and Caddo Gap quadrangles, Ark., by H. D. P�Iiser and H. H. Purdue. 1929. 195 pp. *838. Nitrate deposits of the United States, by G. R. Mansfield and Leona Boardman. 1932. 10 i pp. *847-E. Geology and rr.ineral resources of the western part of the Ar::ansas coal field, � y� T. A. Hendricks and F3ryan Parks. 1937. pp. 1�39-224. *853. Zinc and lead deposits of northern Arkansas, by E. T. McK�igYit. 1935. 311 pp. *878. Analyses of rocks and minerals from the laboratory of the United States Geolcgical Survey, 1514-3ti. 134 pp. 886-C. Geology and ore deposits of the. southwestern Arkansas quicksilver district, by J. C. Reed and F. G. We11s. 1938. pp. 15-90. 75c. 896. Lexicon of geologic names of the United States (including Alaska), by P�'�. G. Wilmarth. 1�38. Part 1, A-L, pp. 1-1244; part 2, I�7-Z, pp. 124�-2396. $Ei.25 fcr the set. *921-A. Mangsnese carbonate in the Batesville district, Ark. , by H. D. hliser, with a chapter cn minerals of the ores, by D. F. Hewett and H. D. Miser. 1941. pp. 1-9"i. *928-C. Adsorbentclays, their distribution, properties, production, and ases, ty P. G. Nutting. 1943. pp. 127- 221. FSUT Lt';Tild:;—C':��t�t�ir�UE�r9 936-fi. Quick�,l�����r. ����E��o: it ; ne;�r thF� i itt1�� c.Ii,�sr�uri �Zive=, F'il�,e Cu�,inty, Arl�_. , t�;� i�as�d ��atL�,ghex•. 13 ^�;. PP• 1-,�-21;�. 55c. 973-P�. a uartz cry stal deposits of western Arkansas, by A. E. J. Engel. 1952, pp. 1 T3-260. $1. � 0. Informat'ion on altitudes in the United States is contained in Bulletins *5, *76, *160, *274, *�i8y, ar,d *r;li. Inforrnation on boundaries and areas of the United States, the several states, and tE�rritories with tustorical ouiiines of bouridary changes is contained in Bulletins *13, *171, *226, *3G2, *68.�, and *�17. Information on re.>ults of prirnary triangulation and primary traverse is c��nt��ined in F7ullE�tins *1��1, *201, *310, *440, and *644. ��'ATER-SUPPLY FAPFRS: *44. Pr�files c�f rivers in the United States, by Henry Garmett. 1y01. 100 pp. *102. Contrit�utions to tYie hydrology of eastern United StatPs, 1903. Contains: Arkansa:�, by A. H. Purduez, pp. 374-3�8. *110. Ccntrihutions to the hydrology of eastern United States, 1904. Contains: Sumr�iary of the water sup��l;� of the Czark regi�n in northern Arkansas, by G. I. Adams, pp. 17:3-182. *114. Underground waters of eastern United States. 1905. Contains: Louisiana and southern Arkansas, by A. C. Veatch, pp. 179-181; Tdorthern Ar�:ansas, by A. H. Purdue, pp. 188-197. *14_5. Contrioution� to the h;ydrology ci eastern United 5tate:,, 19v5. Contains: Water resources of the �h,'inslow quadrangle, Ark. , by A. H. Purdue, pp. 84-87; Water resources of the contact region be- tween the Paleozoic and Mississippi emi,aymeni-deposits in northern Arkansas, oy A. H. Purdue, pp. 98-1i9; Nute:� c�n certain large spring:; ef the Ozark region, Mo. and Ark., by M. L. 'r'u11er, pp. 201-210. *149. Prelim.ir�ary list of deep borings in the United States, by N. H. Darton. 1905. 1i5 pp. *236. Ouality of surfa.ce waters in the United States, Z�art I, Analyses of waters east of the one hundredth meridian, by R,. B. Dole. 1909. 123 pp. *340. StrE�arr!-gaging stations and publications relating to water resources, 1885-1913, by B. D. VJood. 15;i pp. *3F4. ',�Jater analyses from the lab'oratory of the United States Geological Survey, by 'r'. W. Clarke, 1914. 40 pp. *39�. Gecloyy and grotuld water� of northeastern Arl,.ansas, by L. W. Stephenson and A. r. Crider. 191ti. 315 pp. 4&9. Occurrence of ground water in the United States, by O. E. Meinzer. 1923. 321 pp, $2. 25. 557. Large springs in the United States, by O. E. 1�4einzer. 1927. 94 pp. 40c. *560-C. Index of analyses of natural waters in the, United States, by VJ. D. Co�lins and C. S. Howard. 1925. op. 53-85. *659-C. Index of analyses of natural waters in the United States, 1926 to 1931, by W. D. Collins and C. S. H�ward, 1932, pp. 191-209. *679-F3. Therrna� s�rings in the United States, by N. D. Stearns, H. T. Stearns, and G. A. Waring. 193i. PP• 53-206. 680. Droughts of 1930-34, by d. C. Hoyt. 106 pp. 20c. *820. Drouc�t�t of 1936 with discussion on the significance of drouyht in relation to climate, by J. G. Hoyt. 62 pp. 992. Bibliography and index of publications relating to ground water prepared by khe Geological Survey and cooperating agencies, by G. A. �h'aring and O. E. Meinzer. 1947. 412 pp. $1. 995, Index to river sur✓eys rnade by the United States Geological Survey and other agencies revised to Ju1y 1, 1947, by B. E. Jones and R. O. Helland. 145 pp. 75c. The following water-supply papers give inforr�iation on water levels and artesian pressure: *777, *81`l, 909 (25c),939 (30c), 947 (30c), 989 (35c), 1019 (40c), 1026 (45c), 1074 (75c), 1099 (45c), 1129 (40c), and 116�3 (40c). Stream measurements in the years mentioned: Year 1903 1904 i9o5 lgo6 190y 1910 1913 192� 1923 192�F 1925 1926 Water-Supply Paper *99 *131 *173 *209 *267 �2g7 �3p7 �5�7 567 *587 *607 *627 Price $0.15 Year 1927 1928 1929 1930 1931 1932 1933 1934 1935 193� 1937 1938 Water-Supply Paper *647 *667 *687 *702 *717 *732 �7�7 *762 �7g7 *807 *827 *857 Price Year 1939 1940 1941 1y42 1g43 194�+ 19�+5 1946_ 1y47 1948 1949 1950 Water-5upply Paper *�77 *897 927 957 977 1007 10�7 io57 10�37 111'� 1147 1177 Price $0.40 .40 •55 .60 •75 i.00 l.00 i.00 i.00 1.00 LIBRARIES Many of the publications listed may be consulted in the following libraries in Arkansas. CONWAY: Hendrix College. FAYETTEVILLE: Hardy Public. Univer �ity of Arkansas. JONESBORO: Arkansas State College. LITTLE ROCFr: Arkansas Geolegic3l Survey. INS.-DUP. SEC., tASN.. D.C. 7i/Y4 UNITED STATES � DEPARTME�JT OF THE INTERIOR � GEOLOGICAL SURVEY � GEOLOGIC AND WATER-SUPPLY REPORTS ON FLORIDA [To accoinpan� toF�ogra�phic indes maFi] June1�53 The following reports relate to the geology, and to the mineral and water re �ources of Florida. An asterick (*) indicates that the report is out of print, but many. such reports are available for consultation in certain libraries. ' (See list on p. 3) The publications for which the price is stated are sold by the Superintendent of Documents, Govern- ment Printing Office, Washington 25, D. C. Rernittance to that official should be made by postal money order, express money order, or check; postage stamps will not be accepted. If additional references' to geologic inforrnation on this area are required they may be obtained from "Bibliography of North American geology, " published as Bulletins 746, 747, 823, 937, 938, 949, 952, 958, 968, and 977. PROFESSIONAL PAPERS: *11, The clays of the United States east of the Mississippi River, by Heinrich Ries. 1903. 298 pp. *95. Shorter contributions to general geology, 1915. Contains: Erosion intervals in the Eocene of the Mississippi embayment, by E. W. Berry, pp. 73-82; The age of the Ocala limestone, byC. W. Ccoke, pp. 107-117. *98. Shorter contributions to general geology, 1916. Contains: The physical conditions and age indicated by the flora of the Alum Bluff forrnation, by E. W. Berry, pp. 41-59; The Pliocene Citronelle forma- tion of the Gu1f Coastal Plain, by G. C. Matson, pp. 167-192; and The flora,of the Citronelle forma- tion, by E. W. Berry, pp. 193-208; The Catahoula sandstone, by G. C. Matson, pp. 209-226, and The flora of the Catahoula sandstone, by E. W. Berry, pp: 227-251. *108. Shorter contributions to general geology, 1917. Contains: Orbitoid Foraminifera ofthe genus Orthophragmina from Georgia and Florida, by C. W. Cooke and J. A. Cushman, pp. 109-124. 120-A. New determinations of carbon dioxide and water of the Gu1f of Mexico, by R. C. We11s. 1918. pp. 1- 16. lOc. *125. Shorter contributions to general geology, 1919. Contains: The American species of Orthophragmina and Leoidocyclina, by J. A. Cushman, pp. 39-108. *128. Shorter contributions to general geology, 1920. Contains: Lower Miocene Foraminifera of Florida, by 7. A. Cushman, pp. 67-74; American species of Operculina and Heterostegina and their faunal relations and a new species of Orthophra rnina fxom Louisiar�a, by J. A. Cushman, pp. 125-146. *129. Shorter contributions to general geology, 921. Contains: Orthaulax, a Tertiary guide fossil, by C. W. Cooke, pp. 23-37. *133. The correlation of the Vicksburg group, by C. W. Cooke, and The Forarninifera of the Vicksburg group, by J. A. Cushman. 1923. 77 pp. *135. The compositian of the river and lake waters of the United States, by F. W. Clarke. 1924. 199 pp. 142-A. Part I, Prionodesrriacea and Anomalodesmacea, by Ju1ia Gardner. 1926, pp. 1-79. 75c. 142-Fi. Part II, Astartacea, Carditacea, Chamacea, by Julia Gardner. 1926. pp. 81-99. 25c. 142-C. PartIII, Lucinacea, Leptonacea, Cardiacea, by Julia Gardner. 1926. pp. 101-149. 40c. 142-D. PartIV, Veneracea, by Julia Gardner. 1926. pp. 151-184. 35c. 142-E. Part V, Tellinacea, Solenacea, Mactracea, Myacea, Molluscoidea, by Ju1ia Gardner. 1928. pp. 185- 249. 50c. 142-F. Part VI, Pteropoda, Opisthobranchia, and Ctenobranchia (in part), by Ju1ia Gardner. 1937. pp. 251- 435. $l. 142-G. Part VII, Stenoglossa (in part), by Ju1ia Gardner. 1944, pp. 437-491. 25c. 142-H. Part VIII, Ctenobranchia (remainder), Aspidobranchia,and Scaphopoda, by Julia Gardner. 1947. pp. 493-656. $1. 142-L Part IX, 'The Moluscan Fauna of the A1um B1uff Group of Florida. Index to chapters A-H, byJuliaGardner. 35c. 156. Revision of the lower Eocene Wilcox flora of the Southeastern States, with descriptions of new species, chiefly from Tennessee and Kentucky, by E. V�'. Berry. 1930. 196 pp. 75c. 170-D. Pliocene fossils from limestone in scuthern Florida, by V�'. C. Mansfield. 1932. pp. 43-56. 15c. *175-A. Miocene Foraminifera of the Coastal Plain uf the eastern United States, by J. A. Cushrnan and E. D. Cahi11. 1933. pp. 1-50. *181. Upper Eocene Foraminifera of the southeastern United States, by J. A. Cushman. 1935. 88 pp. 189-A. Species and genera of Tertiary Noetinae, by F. S. MacNeil. 1938. pp. 1-49. 20c. 189-F. The Venericardia planicosta group in the Gulf province, by Ju1ia Gardner and Edgar Bowles. • 1939. pp. 1�43-�15. 40c. 193-8. Notes on fossils from the Eocene of the Gulf province: I, The annelid genus `Pubulostium; II, The gastropod families Cassididae, Ficidae, and Buccinidae, by Julia Gardner. l�p. 17-44, lOc. 22,1-F. Pleistocene shore lines in Florida and Georgia, by F. S. MacNeil. 1950. pp. 6`1-94. $1. Plate 19 (rnap) available sep��,rately �,t 50c. F3ULLETINS: *32. *83. *84. *213. *223. *258. *380. *440. *516, *522, *551. *599. �604. *624. *666. *676. *697. * 701. *708. *709. *728. *878. 896. 903. 906-F. *928-C. *934. Lists and analyses of the mineral �prin�s of the United States (a preliminary study), by A. C. Pea1e. 1886. 235 pp. Correlation papers: Eocene, by V�'. B. Clark. 1891. 173 pp. Correlation papers: Neocene, by �h'. H. Uall and G. D. Harris, 1892. 549 pp. Contributions to economic geology, 1902. Contains: Fu11er's-earth deposits af Florida and Georgia, by T. V�'. Vaughan, pp. 392-399. Gypsum deposits in the United States: 1904. Contains: Florida, by D. T. Day, p. 48. The origin of certain place names in the United States (2d edition), by Henry Gannett. 1905. 334 pp. Contributions to economic geology, 1908, Part I. Contains: Notes on the clays of Florida, byG. C. Matson, pp. 346-357. 1�,esults of triangulation and primary traverse, 1906-5. 688 pp. Results of spirit leveling in Florida, 1911. 24 pp. Portland-cement materials and industry in the United States, by E. C. Eckel and others. 1913. 401 pp. Results of triangulation and primary traverse. 1911-12. 396 pp. Our mineral reserves-how to make America industrially independent, by G. O. Smith. J.914. 48 pp. The phosphate deposits of F'lorida, by G. C. Matson. 1915. 101 pp. Useful minerals of the United States, compiled by F. C. Schrader and others, 1916. 412 pp, Our mineral supplies. 1919. Contains: Phosphate rock, by R. W. Stone, 4 pp, ; Clay, by Jefferson Middleton, 3 pp. Some Pliocene and Miocene Foraminifera of the Coastal Plain of the United States, by 7. A. Cushman. 1918. 100 pp. Gypsum deposits of the United States, by R. W. Stone and others. 1920. 326 pp. Geothermal data of the United 5tates, including many original determinations of underground temperature, by N. H. Darton. 1920. 97 pp. High-grade clays of the eastern United States, by H. Ries and others. 1922. 3.14 pp. Triangulation and primary traverse, 1�16-18. Contains: Primary traverse in F-lorida. 1917. pp. 23- 41. The occurrence and uses of peat in the United States, by E. K. Soper and C. C. Osbon. 1922. 207 pp. Analyses of rocks and minerals from the laboratory of the United States Geological Survey, 1914-36, tabulated by R. C. Wells. 134 pp. Lexicon of geologic names of the United States (including Alaska), by M. G. Wilmarth. 1938. Fart I, A-L, pp. 1-1244; part 2, M-Z, pp� 1245-2396. $5.25 for the set, Clay investigations in the Southern States, 1934-35, by W. B. Lang and others. 346 pp. $1. Phosphate investigation in Florida, 1934 and 1935, by P. V. Roundy, pp. 267-345. 30c. Adsorbent clays, their distribution, properties, production, and uses, by P. G. Nutting. 1943. pp. 127- 221. Phosphate resources of Florida, by G. R. Mansfield. 1942. 82 pp, Information on altitudes in the United States is contained in Bulletins *5, *76, *160, *2?4, *689, and *817. Information on boundaries and areas of the United States, the several states, and territories with historical outlines of boundary changes is contained in F3u11etins *13, *171, *226, *302, *689, and *81`7. WATER-SUPPLY PAPERS: *44. Profile.s of rivers in the United States, by Henry Gannett. 1901, 100 pp. *102. Contributions to the hydrology of eastern United States, 1903. Contains: Florida, by M. L. Fuller, pp. 238-275. *114. Underground waters of eastern United States. 1905. Contains: Florida, by M. L. Fuller, pp. 159- 163, *149. Prelirninary list of deep borings in the United States (2d edition, with additions), by N. H. Darton. 1905. 175 pp. *319. Geoloyy and ground waters of Florida, by G. C. Matson and Samuel Sanford. 1913. 445 pp. *364. Water analyses froY�i the laboratory of the United States Geological Survey, tabulated by F. W. 1914. 40 pp. 489. The occurrence of ground water in the United States, with a discussion of principles, by O. E. 1923. 321 pp. $2.25. 557. L,arge springs in the United States, by O. E. Meinzer. 1927. 94 pp. 40c. 596-G. Chetnical character of waters of Florida, by W. D. Collins and C. S. Howard, pp. 177-233. 658. The industrial utility of public water supplies in the United States, 1932, by W. D. Collins, W. and E. W. Lohr. 1934. 135 pp. Clarke. Meinzer. lOc. L. Lamar, *659. Contributions to the hydrology of the United States, 1932. Contains: Index of analyses of natural waters in the United 5tates, 1926-31, by W. D. Collins and C. S. Howard, pp. 191-209. 680. Droughts of 1930-34, by J. C. Hoyt. 106 pp. 20c. *771. Flflcds in the United States, magnitude and frequency, by C. S. Jarvis and others. 1936. 497 pp. 772. Studies of relaticns of rainfall and run-off in the United States, by W. G. Hoyt and others. 1936. 301 pp. IOc. *773-C. Artesian water in the Florida peninsula, by V. T. Strinyfield. 1936. pp. 115-195. *796-A. Methods of locating salt-water leaks in water we11s, by Perin Livingstone and Walter Lynch. 1937. pp. 1-20. WATER-SUPPLY PAPERS—Continued 836-D. Ground water in the United States, a summary of ground-water conditions and resources, utilization of water from we11s and springs, methods of scientific investigation, and literature relating to the subject, by O. E. Meinzer. 1939. pp. 157-232. 25c. *837. Inventory of unpublished hydrologic data, by W. T. Holland and C. S. Jarvis. 1938. 77 pp. 992. Bibliography and index of publications relating to ground water prepared by the Geological Survey and cooperating agencies, by G. A. Waring and O. E. Meinzer, 1947. 412 pp. $1. 995. Index to river surveys made b'y the United States Geological Survey and other agencies revised to July 1, 1947, by B. E, dones and R. O. Helland. 145 pp. 75c. 1066. Floods of August 1940 in the Southeastern States, prepared by the Water Resources Branch of the U. S. Geological Survey. 1949, 554 pp. $2. 75. The following water-supply papers give information on water levels and artesian pressure: 777 (30c), 817 (75c), 840 ($1), 845 (75c), 886 ($1), 907 (20c), 937 (20c), 945 (25c), 987 (35c), 1017 (70c), 1024 (50C), 1072 (75c), 1097(BOc), 1127 (55c), and 1157 (55c). The followinq water-supply papers give information on the quality of surface waters: 942 (15c), 950 (15c), 970 (30c), 1022 (55c), 1030 (60c), 1050 ($1.25), and 1102 ($1.50). Stream measurements in the years mentioned: Year Water-Supply Price Year Paper 1906 1907-8 1g12 1913 1g22 1923 1924 1925 1926 1g27 1928 *204 *242 *322 *352 *542 562 *582 *602 *622 *642 *662 $o.i5 1929 1g3o 1931 1932 1933 1934 1935 1936 1g37 1938 1939 Water-Supply Paper �682 *697 *712 �727 �742 *757 �782 �802 *822 *852 *g72 LIBRARIES Price Year 19�0 1941 1942 19�+3 1944 1945 1946 1g47 1948 1949 Water-Supply Paper *g92 922 952 972 1002 1032 1052 io82 1112 1142 Many of the publications listed above may be consulted in the following libraries in Florida: CORAL GABLES: University of Miami. DELAND: John B. Stetson University. FORT LAUDERDALE: Public. GAINESVILLE: University of Florida•. JACKSONVILLE: Public. Price $0.75 .60 l.00 1.00 1.50 1.25 1.25 1.25 1.50 LAKELAND: Public. TALLAHASSEE: Florida Agricultural and Mechanical College. Florida Geological Survey. Florida State. Florida State University. WINTER PARK: Rollins College. INT.-WP. SEC., WASH.. D.C.42'I04 � � � � O a UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR GEOLOGICAL SURVEY GEOLOGIC AND WATER-SUPPLY REPORTS ON LOUISIANA [Tu aocoxnpany to��o�ra,phic. ind�x niap] Novemb�r 1952 The following reports relate to the geology, and to the r�zineral an� water resources of Louisiana. If additional geologic information is required on this area, it may be obtained from "Bibliography of R�orth American geology, " published as BulletinU 746, 747, 823, 937, 938, 949, 952, 958, 968, and 977. An asterisk (*) indicates that the report is out of print, but many such reports are available for consultation in certain libraries. (See list on p. 3. ) The publications for which the price is stated are sold by the Superintendent of Documents, Government Frinting Office, Washinqton 25, D. C. Remittance to that official should be made by postal money order, express money •order, or check; postage stamps will not be accepted. MCNCGR�AFH: *39. The Eocesie and lower Oligocene coral fausias of the United States, with descriptions of a few doubtfully Cretaceous species, by 'I'. W. Vaughan. 1900. 263 pp. FR.CFESSICNAL FAFERS: *46. Geology and underground water resources of northern Louisiana and southern Arkansas, by A. C. �,reatch. 1906. 422 pp. *85. Shorter contributions to general geoloyy, 1913. Contains: The mud lumps at the mouths of the Mississippi, by E. W. Shaw, pp. 11-27. *91. The lower Eocene floras of southeastern North Arnerica, by F. W. Berry. 1916. 481 pp. 92. The middle and upper Eocene floras of southeastern North America, by E. W. Berry. 1924. 206 pp. $1. *95. Shorter contributions to general geology, 1915. Contains: Erosion intervals in the Eocene of the Mississippi embayment, by F. W. Berry. pp. 73-82. *98. Shorter contributions to general geology, 1916. Contains: The Fliocene Citronelie formation of the Gulf CoastalFlain by G. C. Matson, pp. 167-192; The Catahoula sandstone, by G. C. Matson, pp. 209-226, and the flora of the Catahoula sandstone, by E. W. Berry, pp. 227-251. 120-A. New dF�terminations of carbon dioxide in water of the Gulf of Mexico, by R. C. Wells, pp, 1-16. 1919. lOc. *128. Shorter contributions to general geology, 1920. Contains: American species of Operculina and Heterostegina arid their faunal relations and a new species of Crthophragmina from Louisiana, by J. A.. Cushman, pp. 125-146. *135. The composition of the river and lake waters of the United States, by F. W. Clarke. 1924. 199 pp. 156. Revision of the lower Eocerie Wilcox flora of the Southeastern States, by E. W. E3erry. 1930. 196 pp. 75c. 175-D. Origin of the anhydrite cap rock of American salt domes, by M. I. Goldman. 1933, pp. 83-114. 15c. *181. Upper Eocene Foraminifera of the southeastern United States, by J. A. Cushman. 1935. 88 pp. 189-F. The Venericardia planicosta group in the Gulf province, by dulia Gardner and Edgar Bowles. 1939. pp. 143-215: 40c. BULLETINS: *83. Correlation papers: Eocene, by W. B. Clark. 1891. 173 pp. *84. Correlation paperU: Neocene, by W. H. Dall and G. D. Harris. 1892. 349 pp. *142. A brief contribution to the geology and paleontology of northwestern Louisiana, by T. W. Vaughan. 1896. 65 pp. *212. Cil fields of the Texas-Louisiana Gulf Coastal Flain, by C. W. Hayes and Wiliiam Kennedy. 1903, 174 pp. *213. Contributions to economic geology, 1902. Contains Cil fields of the Texas-Louisiana Gulf Coastal Flain, by C. W. Hayes, pp, 345-352. *245. Results of primary triangulation and orimary traverse, 1903-4, by S. S. Gannett. 328 pp. *258. The oriyin of certain place names in the United States (second edition), by Henry Gatinett. 1905. 334 op. *260. Contributions to economic geology, 1904. Contains: Oil fields of the Texas-Louisiana Gulf coast, by N. M. Fennemau, pp. 459-4Ei. *282. Cil fields of the Texas-Louisiana Gulf Coastal Flain, by N. M. Fenneman. 1906. 146 pp. *310. Results of primary triangulation and primary traverse, 1905-6, by S. S. Gannett. 248 pp. *429. Cil and gas in Louisiana, by G. D. Harris. 1910. 192 pp. *458. Results of spirit leveling in Arkansas, L:ouisiana, and Mississippi, 1896-1909. 79 pp. *522. Fortland cement material� and indu �try in the iJnited States, by E. C. Ecke1 and others. 1913. 401 pp. *530. Cortributions to economic geology, 1911. Contains: The occurrence of potash salts in the bitterns of the eastern United States, by W. C. Fhalen, pp. 313-329. BULI.,ETINS--Continued *541. Contributions to E�conomic geology, 1912, part 2. Coutains: G�:� from niu3 luxnp:, at the xnouths of the Mississippi, by E. �N. Shaw, pp. 19-22. *599. Our mineral reserves--how to make America industrially independent, by G. O. Stnith. 1914. 48 pp. *619. The Caddo oil and gas field, Louisiana and Texas, by G. C. Matson. 1916. 62 pp. 620-G. Iron-bearing depositsin Bossier, Caddo, and Webster Farishes, La., by E. F. Burchard, pp. 129- 150. 5c. *623. Fetroleum withdrawals and restorations affecting the public domain, by M. W. Ball. 1916. 42,7 pF!. *624. Useful minerals of the United States, by F. C. Schrader and others. 1916. 412 pp. *634. Spirit leveling in I,ouisiaiia, 1903-15, 101 pp. *644-I. Frimary traverse in Louisiana and Mississippi, 1913-15, pp. 404-414. *660-E. Louisiana clays, by G. C. Matson, pp. 147;158. *6Fi1. Contributions to economic geology, 1911, part 2. Contains: The De Soto-Red River oil and gas field, La., by G. C. Matson and O. B. Hopkins, pp. 101-140. *669. Salt resources of the United States, by W. C. Fhalen. 1919. 284 pp. *697. Gypsum deposits ofthe United States, by R. W. Stone and others. 1920. 326 pp. *716. Contributions to economic geology, 1920, part 2. Contains: Natural-gas resource:� available to Dallas and other cities of central north Texas, by E. W. Shaw and F. L. Forts, pp. 55-89. 845. Guidebook of the western United States, part F, The Southern Facific Lines, New Orleans to Los Angeles, by N. H. Darton. 1933. 304 pp. $1. 896. Lexicon of geologic names of the United States, by M. G. Wilmarth. 1938. Fart 1, A-L, pp. 1-1244; part 2, M-Z, pp. 1245-2396. $5.25 for the set. *928-C. Adsorbent clays, their distribution, properties, production, and uses, by F. G. Nutting. 1934. pp. 127-221. Information on altitudes in the United States is contained in Bulletins *5, *76, *160, *274, *689, and *817. Infortnation on boundaries and areas of the United States, the severai states, and territories with historical outlines of boundary changes is contained in Bulletins *13, *171, *226, *302, *689, and *817. Information on results of primary triangulation and primary traverse is contained in Bulletins *245, *310, *440, and *496. WATER- �UFFLY FAFERS: *44. Frofiles of rivers in the United States, by Henry Gannett. 1901. 100 pp. *101. Underground waters of southern Louisiana, by G. D. Harris. 1904. 98 pp. *114. Underyrourid waters of eastern United States. 1905. Contains: Louisiana and southern Arkansas, by A. C. Veatch, pp. 179-187. *149, Freliminary list of deep borings in the United States, by N. H. Darton. 1905. 175 pp. *236. The quality of surface waters in the United States, part 1, Analyses of waters east of the one hundredth meridian, by R. B. Dole. 1909. 123 pp. 489. The occurrence of ground water in the United States, with a discussion of principles, by C. E. Meinzer. 1923. 321 pp. $2. 25. 658. The industrial utility of public water supplies in the United States, 1932, by W. D. Collins, W. L. Lamar, and E. W. Lotir. 135 pp. 35c. *659. Contributions to the hydrology of the United States, 1932. Contains: Index of arialyses of natural waters in the United 5tates, 1926-31, by W. D. Collins and C. S. Howard, pp. 191-209. 680. Droughts of 1930-34, by J. C. Hoyt. 106 pp. 20c. *771: Floods in the United States, magnitude and frequency, by C. S. Jarvis and others. 1936. 497 pp. 772. Studies of relations of rainfall an3 run-off in the United States, by W. G. Hoyt and others. 1936. 301 pp. 70c. *820. Drought of 1936, with discussion on the significance of drought in relation to climate by J. C. Hoyt. 62 pp. *837. Inventory of unpublished hydrologic data, by W. T. Holland and C. S. Jarvis. 1938. 77 pp. *838. Floods of Ohio and Mississippi Rivers, January-February 1937, N. C. Grover, chief hydraulic engineer; with a section on the Flood deposits of the Ohio River, January-February 1937, by G. R. Mansfield. 746 pp. *847, Maximum discharges at stream-measurement stations through December 31, 1937, by G. R. William:s and L. C. Crawford, with a supplement including additions an3 changes through September 30, 1938, by W. S. Eisenlohr, Jr. 272 pp. 992. Bioliography and index of publications relating to grourid water prepared by the Geological Survey and cooperating agencies, by G. A. Waring and O. E. Meinzer. 1947. 412 pp. $1. 995. Index to river surveys made by the United States Geological Survey and other agencies revise3 to July 1, 1947, by B. E. Jones and R. C. Helland. 145 pp. 75c. 1022. Quality of surface waters of the United States, 1944, by Water Resources Branch, Division of Quality of Water. 1947. 311 pp. 55c. 1030. Quality of surface waters of the United States, 1945. 1949. 335 pp. 60c. The follo�,uing water-supply papers give iriforts�ation ��n water levels and artE;siasi preSsurE�:, *o4:i, *���if;, 909 (25c), 939 (30c) 947 (30c) 858 (3��c), 1019 (40c) 192E (45c), 10`i4 (75c), 1099 (45c), and 112� (40c). Year 1906 1907-8 1922 1g23 1924 1925 i926 1927 1928 1929 1930 1g31 �-93� Stream measurements in the Water-Supply Paper Price *210 *242 �5�7 * 5�+� 567 $o.i5 568 .30 *587 *588 *607 *608 *627 *628 *647 *648 *667 *668 *687 *688 *702 *703 *717 *718 *7�� years mentioned: Water-fiupply Year Yaper 1932 *733 1933 *747 * 7�+8 1934 *762 �763 1935 *7B7 �788 1936 �807 *808 1937 *�27 *-828 1938 *857 �g5g 1939 *872 *�77 �g7g 1940 *892 *897 �g9B 1941 922 927 g28 Price Year 1942 19�+3 194�+ 19�+5 1946 1947 194£3 $0•75 . �+o . �+o i�a4�� WatF,r-Supply Paper 952 957 95B 972 977 978 l002 1007 ioo3 1037 1038 1052 1057 lo5B 1082 10�7 1088 1112 1117 1118 1147 ii�« LII=�I� AFLIEu Many of the publications listed above may be consultEad in the foll�,�;ing librar�es in Loui.�i?iu�: F3ATON ROUGE: NEW ORLEAN.i: Louisiana State University. Howard-Tiltor� P.1exn��r�iral. Louisiana State University Law. Law Librar;� of L,nui:,i;,n<a. Louisiana Geological Survey. Loyola Unicersity. LAFAYETTF: Public. Southwestern Lou�siana Institute. Tulane University . LAKE CHARLES: RUSTON: John McNeese Junior College. Louisiana Polytechnic Inctitute. NATCHITOCHES: SHREVEPORT: Northwestern 5tate Cnllege. ShrE�vf� 1�7E�mo-rial. Yrice $0.60 .40 .40 1.00 • �J�) . �+o l.00 .60 . �+�� •75 .60 1. �>�i 1.0`� 1.ou 1. �a�; 1.0� , 6�> 1. �'5 1.00 1.00 1.0�) 1. r��; � INT.-G!1P. ;EC.. WA:!I.. D.C.3(�:�yn . UNITED STATES a DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR � GEOLOGICAL SURVEY � c�n GEOLOGIC AND WATER-SUPPLY REPORTS ON ra - � MISSISSIPPI �To a<�coinpang to��ographir. index map) January 1953 The following reports relate to the geology and to the mineral and water resources of Mississippi. An asterisk (*) indicates that the report is out of print, but rriany such re.ports are availa,ble for consultation in certain libraries. (See list on p. 4. ) The publicaticns for which the price is stated are sold by the Superintendent of Documents, Governrr.ent Printing Office, Washington 25, D. C. Rerriittance to that official should be rnade by postal money order, express order, or check;�postage stamps wi11 not be accepted. If additional references to geologic information on this area are required they niay be: obtained from "Biblicgraph,y of North American geoloc�y," published as Bulletins 746, 747, 823, 937, 938, 949, 952, 958, 968, and 977. ANNUAL REPORTS: *Fourth, 1882-83. Contains: A review of the fossil Ostreidae of North America and a comparison of the fossil and the living forr��s, by C. A. VJkiitr�, pp. 273-430. *Eighth, 1�386-c7. Part II contains: The geographical distribution of fossil plants, by L. F. Ward, ' pp. 663-960. *TwFlfth, 1890�J1. F�art I contains: The� Lafayette formation, by VJ J I�TcGee, pp. 347-521. *Thirteenth, 1591-92. Part II contains: The. geolcgical history of harbors, by N. S. Shaler, pp. 93-209. *F'ourtee,nth, 1892-93. Part II contains: Potable waters of eastern United States, by W J McGee, pp. 1-�7; Natural mineral waters of the United States, by A. C. Pea1P, pp. 49-88. *Sixteenth, 1£394-95. Part I contains: Principles of 1`dorth American pre-Camt;rian geolcgy, by C. R. Van Hise, with an appendix on flow and fracture of r�cks as related to :�tructure, by L. M. F3oskins, PP• 571-� 74. SeventF��E��ntti, 1895-96. F'art I contains: Magnetic declination in the United States, by Henry Gannett, pp. 203-440. *EigtiteentY�, 189t:-97. F'art II contain:>: A tak;le of Tdorth Arr�erican Tertiary horizons, correlated witti one another and witti those cf western Europe, with annotations, by V�'. H. Da11, pp. 323-348. *NinE�teentti, 1897-9�. Part IV contains: Report of prcgress of stream measurements for the calendar year 189�i, hy F. H. Ne��,�e11, including papers by Dwight Porter, J. B. Lippincott, and other hydroyraphers, pp. 1-632, *TwentiE th, 1�398-99. Part IV contains: Report of progress of stream measurements for the calendar year 1898, by b'. H. Newe11, pp. 1-562. MONOGRAPHS: *39. The Eocene and lower 0ligocene ccrai faunas of the United States, with descriptions of few doubtfully Cretaceous species, by� T. W. Vaughan. 1900. 263 pp. *44. i�:;eudoceratitc=s of the Cretaceous, by Alpheus Hyatt, edited by T. W. Stanton. 1903. 351 pp. *�i4. The P�'Iesozoic and Cenozoic Echinodermata of the United States, by Vc. B. Clark and M. W. Twitchell. 1915. 341 pp. PROFESSIONAL PAF?ERS: *11. The clays of the United States east of the Mississippi River, by Heinrich Ries. 1903. 298 pp. *58. Ttie Guadalupianfauna, by G.�H. Girty. 1908. 651 pp. *81. Cretaceous deposits of the eastern Gulf region and Species of Exogyra from the eastern Gulf region and the Carclinas, by L. Vd. Stephenson. 1914. 77 pp. *90. Shorter contributions to general geology, 1914. Contains: The Cretaceous-Eocene contactin the Atlantic and GulfCoastalPlain, by L. W. Stephenson, pp. 155-182. *91. The lower Ec:cene flcras of southeastern North America, by E. W. Berry. 1916. 481 pp. 92. The middle and upper Eccene floras of southeaUtern North America, by E. W. E3erry. 1924. 206 pp. $1. *95. Shorter contrihutions to general geology, 1915. Cuntains; Erosion intervals in the Eocene of the Mississippi embayment, by E. Vd. Berry, pp. 73-82; The age of the Oca1a limestone, by C. W. Cooke, pp. 10`T-117. *9�. Sherter contributions to general geology, 1916. The physical conditions and aqe indicated by the flora of the Alum E31uff formation, by E. V�I. F3erry, pp. 41-59; North American Upper Cretaceous corals of the genus P��icra�acia, by L. W. Stephenson, pp. 115-131; The Pliocene Citronelle formation of the GulfCoastal P1ain, by G. C. Matson, pp. 167-192; The flora of the Citronelle formaticn, by E. �Fi. E3erry, pp. 193-208; The Catahoula sandstone, by G: C. Matson, pp. 209- 226; The flora of the Catahoula sandstone, by E. W. Berry, pp. 227-251. � i � j_ t; r. TJr i �:r�i„'__C�. u'�.�te�u *l�� ..;Ci_rtF�r c:�n�rie�uii�n.� t.� genE�ra1 t{Eaoi��gr, 1`:�1��, .,;;ntairi.�: :�e� _�,� c}ii�t.;ry �r_�_e,�Ce�,3 i;� ti���� fossiliferous deposits of the V„'ilcox group (Eccene) at I�'Iericliari, i�7iss., by E. 6V. Berr;;, pp. E1-72; The Pliocene history of central and northern P��ississippi, by E. 4�J. Shaw, z F, 125-163. *112. Upper Cretaceou:7 floras of tkie eastern Gu1f region in Tennessee, Mississippi, Alabama, aric3 Gecrgia, t;y E. �h,". Berry. 1919. 177 pp. *129. Shorter contributions to general geology, 1921. Contairis: The Byram calcareous marl � f nlississipp�, k:y C. Vt'. Cooke, op. 79-85; The Forar�,inifera of ttie Byram calcareous rsiarl �+t Byrarn, Miss., b,y J. A. Cushman, pn. 8i-122; The Forazninifera of the Mint Spring calcar��ouc ?nari memt;er of the idtarianna limestone, by J. A. Cushman, pp. 123-152. *131. Shorter contributions to general geclogy, 1922. Ccntains: Additions tc the. flora ef the Wilcox gr�up, by E. �T�'. f�crry, pp. i-21. *133. The correl3tion of the Vicksburg group, by C. W. Cooke, azld TYi� Forminifera of the VicYsbury group, by J. A. Cushman. 1923. 77 pp. *135. The ccmposition of 'the river and la�e waters of the United States, by F'. W. Clarke. 1924. 199 pp. *140. Shcrter contributions to general geology, 1925. Contains: Correlation ofthe Eocenef^rtr.ations in P�'fississippi and Alabama, by �'ythe Cooke, pp, 133-136. 1;;6. Revision of the iower Eucene Wilcox flcra of the S::utheastern States, with descriptions of new spc:cies, chiefly from Tennessee and Kentncky, by E, V�'. Berry. 1930. 196 pp. 75c. *191. Upper Eocene Fc�rarninifera of the southeastern United States, by J. A. Cushman. 1935. �8 pp. 189-F. The Venericardia plaxiicosta g-roup in the Gu1_f province, by Ju1ia Gardner and Edgar Bowles. 1939. FP�-`�- �c. 193-E�. Notes on fcssils from the Eocene of the Gulf province: I, `ihe anneli�d genus `I'ubulostium; II, The gastropcd families Cassididae, Ficidae, and Eiuccinidae, by Julia Gardner. 1939, pp. 17-44, lOc. 206. I�Fper Cretaceous Fora�iiniiera of the Gulf coastal region of ttie United States and adjacent areas, by J. A. Cushrn�n. 1946. 241 pp. $1.'75. 210-E. New Upper Cretaceous fossils from Mi:;sissippi and Texas, part 1, Fossils from two deep we11s in Mississiopi, by L. V„'. Stephenson. 1947. pp. lE1-185. 30c. 232. Paleocene Forars�inifera of t'tie Gulf coastal region of the United States and adjacent areas, by J. A. Cu �hman, 1951. � 75 pp. � 1. 75. BULLFTINS: *32. Lists and anaiyses of the mineral springs of the United States (a preliminary study), by A. C. Peale. 1886. 235 pp. *42. Report of wcrk done in the divis;on of chem�istry and physics, mainly during the fiscal year 1885-86. lfi2 pp. Contains: P✓Iiscellaneous analyses, pp. 13ti-1 *�. *43. Tertiary and Cretaceous strata of the Tuscaloosa, 'I'oa;oigbee, and Alabama Rivers, by E. A. Smith and L�. C. Johnscn. 1887. 1�J9 pp, *f>4. A report of tY;e work r�one in the division of chemistry and physics, mainly during the fiscal year 1888-�,9. Cor.tains: I�2isce1lanecus an�lyses, pp. 40-60. *�0. Correl�tion napers: Devoniar, and Carbonifereu:, by H. S. b�iilliams. 1s,91. 279 pp. *82,. Correlation papers: Cretaceous, by C. A. White. 18�1. 273 pp. *F33. Correlation papers: Eocene, by W. F3. Clark. 1891. 1`r'3 pp. *84. C;orreiation papers: Neocene, by W. H. Dall aizd G. D. Harris. 1,;92. 349 pp. *97. The Mesczoic Echinodermata of the United States, by W. B. C1ark. 1393. 207 op. *123. A dict;onary of geographic position:; in thE: United States, ccrripiled k,y t+enry Gar�nett, chief topographer. 1895. 1�3 pp. *213. Contributions to econorriic geolog;�, 1902. Contazns: StonEware and brick clays of western Tennessee and m.rthwestern Mississippi, h;� E. C. Eckel, pp. 382-391. *25c�. !.he origin of certain place names in the UnitE:d States (2d editicn), �y Henry C=armett. 1905. 334 pp. *260. Contributions to econcmic geolc;gy, 1904. Contains: Cemerit resources oi northeast f�Iississippi, by A. F. Crider, Pp. 510-521. *264. Re.cord uf deep-well drilling for 1904, by M. L. Fu11er, E. F. Lines, and A. C. Veatch. 106 pp. *283. Geology and mineral resources of Pv2ississippi, by A. F'. Crider. 1906. �9 pp. *298. Record of de�p-we11 drilling for 1905, by M. L. Fuller and Sa�s.uel Sanford. 299 pp. � *45�3. Results of spirii 1eveling in Arkansas, Louisiana, an� Mississippi, 18�� to 19u9, inclusive. 79 pp. *465. TYie State geological surveys of the United States, compiled ur_der the direction of C. W. Hayes, 1911. 177 pp. *522. Portland cement rnaterials and industry in the Uni�ed States, by E. C. Eckel, with cvntrieutions by F', F', �urchard and others. 1913. 401 pp. *624. Useful m,iner�ls of the Uii�ted States, compiled by F. C. Schr� der, R. �V. Stone, and Samuel Sanford. 1516. 412 gp. *639. Spirit leveling in Mississippi, 1501-15. 80 pp. *641. Contributions to �ecenomic geology, 1916, Part II. Contains: Structure of the Vicksburg-Jackson area, Miss. , with special reference to oi1 and gas, 'ty O. �. Hopkins, pp. 93-120. *666. Our mineral surplie+s. 1919. Cuntains: Portland cemen�, by E. F. Eiurchard, 5 pp. ; Clay, by Jeffersoa Middleton, 3 pp. F3iiLLF�'i:7TSL'�--t" �i'�_�'_r,�te�;j *FJ97. ���;�c �;ur-�. �iF p� e;it:< ��_�f ttiE� IJ .itE�:� �iates, t�;� F?. �x,7. „�c;ne ar.3 ethF�ro. 19�U ;��; pp. *701. Geothermal data r-f thF� Ur_ited States, includi*�g many origir.al determirations of under,�round tem�;erature, k��y N. Fi. Dartcn. 1920. 97 pp. *70�3. �3igYi-yra.d� clay; cf ttie eastern United States, with notes on some western clays, �;� H. Ries, W. �. Bayley, ar:d oihers. 1922. 314 pp. � *729. `I'he �;ccurrer_ce ar_d uses cf peat in tl-ie United States, Y;y E. K. Scper and C. C. Osoon. 1922. 20�,' pp• 7�i0. Ccr_tributic,ns tc economic geology, 1923-2n, Part I. 143 pp. 30c. Contains: F3auxite in northeastern P�lississippi, by E. F. Burchard, pp. 1Q1-146. *781. Cortrihuti�r_s tc ecoromic geology, 192�i, F'art II. Contains: Yaleozoic formations penetrated by wells in `I'isncrningo Ccunty, r_oriheastern T�4ississippi, by M. N. Bramlette, pp. 1-10; I`dote: �:�n Paleozoic r��ck� encouritered in a we11 ir 'r'lcrer.ce, Ala. , by F�. Li. Miser, pp. 11-12. 831. Contributions to economic geology, 1931, Part II. 108 pp. :�5c. (a) The Jackson gas field, Hinds ar.d Rankir. Counties, Miss. , by W. H. Monrce, pp. 1-19, lOc. 896. Lexicon of geulcgic names of the Uriited States (includir.g Alaska), by N1. G. Wilmarth. 1938. Part l, A-L, z;p. 1-1244; Part 2, M-Z, pp. 1245-2396. $5.25 for the set. 901. C1a;� ir;vestigations ir. the Southerr< States, 1934-35, reports by Vv. E3. Lang, P. B. King, M. N. �Bramlette, T. N. I�1cVay, H. X. Bay, ar,d A. C. Munyan, with an introduction by G. R. Mansfield. 346 pp. $ L *93s3-C. Adsortent clays, their d� tra�utior., �rct,E.rtie:;, Er ,�3uct��.�r., and u�E�:;�, t��; �'. G. Nutting. 1943. E'F. 127-221. Infortr?ati ;r cr: altitudes ir the United �;taif�., ::� _unt��ir�e�a in f�u11t�.�!z�s *f,, *76, *1r�0, *274, *6�y, an�9 *817. Information on boundaries and areas of tYie Ur�:ite� States, the� several States, and territcric�;, with histc�ric��l outlire:s of toundtiry changes is contained in Bulleiins *13, *171, *226, *302, *689, and *817. Inforxnation cr results of prirnary triar.gul_atior. and F::rimary traversr� i: cr,nt�ined in F�u1le�tin❑ *�',lt;, *24_5, *310, *440, *:iE;1, and *644-I. Analyses of rocks and rninF�re�i:� fr��rn thE 1a�r,or�?t :ry ��f 'the� Un�tF�d State�;� GF��l��ical ;;ur�F�y art� g�ven in Bu1le,tin� *183, *228, *419, *f;gl, ,ar�� *�;7:�;. WATER-SUPPLY PAPEF2S: *44. Profiles of rivF�r:, in the Unite=-� ;;t,tte:s, k�y� EiE�r�ry G;�nnett. 1951. 100 pp. *102. Contrik�utions t���, the hydrolagy uf eastern United States, 1�03. Contains: Notes on the we11s, sprir.gs, and ge�neral water resources of certain eastern and central States--Mississippi, by L. C. dohnson and E. C. F'ckel, pp. 332-357. *103. A review cf the laws forbidding pcllutior_ of inland waters in the United States, by E. B. Goodell, 1904. 120 pp. *114. Undcsground waters cf eastern Ur.ited States. 1905. Contains. P�Iississippi, by L. C. Johr.son, �pp. 171-17�3. *149. Preliminar;� list of deep bcrings in the United States (2d edition, with additions), by N. H. Darton. 1905. 17Ei pp. *159. Summary of the ui�derground-water resources of Mississippi, by A. F. Crider and L. C. Johnson. 1906. S6 pp. *234. F?apers on the cor.servation of water resources (reprinted from report of the Pdational Conservation Commic�sion, February 19G9). Ccntains: Develcped water powers, compiled under the directir,n of t,G. I'�1. Steuart, with discussion by M. O. Leighton, pp, 2�-45; Undeveloped water powers, by M. O. Leighton, pp. 46-58; Denudation, by R. B. Do1e and Herrrian Stabler, gp. 78-93. *236. The quality of surface waters ir. the United States, Part I, Analyses of waters east of the one hundredth meridian, by Ft. F�. Dole. 1909. 123 pp. *280. Gaging stations mainta,ined by the United States Geological Survey, 1888-1910, and Survey publications relating to water resources, compilea by E3. D. Wood. 102 pp. *340. Stream-gaging stations and publications relating to water resourcF�s, 18�35-1913, compiled by B. D. Wood. Contains: Part II, South Atlantic coast and e3stern Gulf of Mexicu drainage basins, pp. 21-30; Part VII, Lower Mississippi River F3asi*i, pp. 83-93. *364. Water analyses from the lak�oratory of the United States Geological Survey, tabulated by F. W. Clarke. 1914. 40 pp. 489. The cccurrence of ground water iti the United 5tates, with a discussion of principles, by O. E. MeinzF�r. 1923. 32.1 pp. $2.25. *496. `Phe industrial utility of public water.supplies in the United States, by W. D. Collins. 1923. 59 pp. *520-F. Temperature of water available for ir�dustrial use in the United States, by W. D. Collins, �p. 97-104. *5E;0. Contributicns to the hydrology of the United States, 1925. Contains: Index of analyses of natural waters in the United States, by W. D. Collins and C. S. Hcward, pp. 53-85. *576. The ground-water respurces of Mississippi, by L. W. Stephenson, W. N. Logan, and G. A. Waring, with discussions of the chemical character of the waters, by C. S. Howard. 1928. 515 pp. 65.'. The industrial utility of public water supplies in the United States, 1932, by W. D. Collins, W. L. Lamar, and E. W. Lohr. 135 pp. 35c. ��'ATER-SUPPLY PAPFRS--Cuntiriued *659. Contributions to the hydrolcgy of th� United States, 1�3�. Contains Ii�dex cf analyse:; .,f ri�tural waters ��n the United States, 1�2C�-31, by �h;. D. Coilins and G. S. H�ward, pp. 191-209. 680. Drcughts cf 1930-34, by J. C. Hoyt, lOti pp. 20c. *771. F1ooc�s.in the Unit�;d States, m3gnitude and frequency, by C. S. Jarvis an�3 others. i�36. 497 pp. 772. Studies of relations of rainfall ancl run-off in the United States, by W. G. Hoyt and ottiE�r.;, ly3ti. 301 pp. 70c. *820. Drought of 1936, with discussion on the significance �f �lrougtit in relation to climate, b;� d. C. Fic,yt. 62 pp. *837. Inventory of un�ublished hydrolcgic data, by �TJ. 1. Ho11arn] and C. :;. Jarvi.,. 1938. 77 pp. *838. Flocds of Ohio and TJiississippi Riv�rs, January-P'ebruary 1937, N. C. Gr:�ver, chiE�f kiydrauli�•. engineer; with a section on the Flood deposits of t�ie OYii;> River, January-FeY�ruary 193;, ti�;� . G. R. P�Iansfield. 746 pp. *�4Ei, Natural water loss :n selected drainage baUins, by G. EZ. J�illiams and other�. 1�40. ei2 ��p, *847. M�i�s,uri discharg�s at :;tream-measurement st�tions thr��ugh Decernber 31, 1931, cy G. R. �,F�'illiams and L. C. Cr3wford, with a sunpler_ient includiny additions arid cYi�ngE�s thruuyt� September 30, 1938, by V�'. S.� Bisenlchr, Jr. 212 pp. 992. Bibliography �nd index cf publications relating to ground watt�r prepared b;� tYie Geolcgical Survey and cooperatzng agencie �, by G. �. UJarin�� and O. E. Meinzer. 1�47. 412 pp. $1. 995. Iadex to river surveye rnade by the Uniteci States Geological Survey and �ther ag�ncie � r�vised to July 1, 1947, by E3. E. Jones and R. O. Hellan�i. 145 pp. 75c. The following water-supply papers givE� information �n water 1E�vE�1°� and artesian pre��ure: *777, *�? 7, *�40, *845, *88Fi, 907 (2�Jc), 937 (20c), 945 (25c), 987 (35c), 1�17 (;Oc), 1024 (50c), 10 r2 ( � 5c), 1097 (6Jc), and 1127 (65c).. Stream measurements iti the years m�.ntionea: Year 1900 1�01 1902 1903 1904 1905 1906 1907-8 1909 1910 1911 1912 Water-Supply Paper Yrice I *48 *�5 *75 *�3 �9F3 �127 *128 *16�s *169 *20�F �205 *242 �247 *262 *267 '� 282 �287 *302 �-3�7 *322 �327 Year 1913 19�8 1y29 lg3o i�)3i l:)32 1933 1934 1a35 1936 1937 193�3 1939 Water-Supply Paper Price �352 �662 *6�32 *687 *6'�7 *702 *712 *'717 �727 *732 *742 *747 *757 *762 *782 � 7�37 *f302 *�322 *g5� * 372 LIF�RARIES Year 1939. 194� 1! �41 1y42 L��43 1�3�+4 1��F5 1.���46 1:. '+7 1 �4�3 1y4� Water-Supply Y�;.�er � iJ77 *�3��2 *fj�7 y22 927 952 957 'j72 �77 1002 l0i)7 1032 io37 1052 1057 1082 10� �7 1112 1117 11�+7 ZJlany cf the publicati�,ns listed abov� may be consulted in the following l�braries in �_ississippi: AGRICUL'I'URAL COLLFGE: � PJ:issi: sippi Agricultural and Mechanical College. C OLUI�IBUS: J. C. Fant PJiemorial. HATTIES�3URG: i�l=ssissippi Southern College. 7AC �?SON: Mississippi State. 4 Yrice $0•75 .40 .50 .40 1.00 •55 1.00 .6� �.50 •75 1.25 1.00 1.25 l.00 1.25 1.�0 i.00 STA'TE COLLEGE: P.lississippi St�ste Ccllege. UNIVERSITY: University cf �cTissis.:inpi. i 2is: iss_����i Geological Survey. �TICFKSf3Ui�G: :��issis:sippi River Cnmr::is:;i _;^. INT.-DUP. SEC., IIASH.. O.C. 32IY7 �_ , IINITED BTATES DEPAKTMF.NT OF TFIF INTEEtIOR Q,' (�F.ULO(�ICAL FUR`'EY O GEOLOGIC AND WATERrSUPPLY R.EPORTS ON � OKLAHOMA � 1-� [To scrompany topographir indes mep] � Mamh 1951 The following reports relate to the geology and to the mi.neral and water resources of Oklahoma. An asterisk (�� indicaLes that the report is out of print, but many such reports are available for consultation in certain libraries. (See list on p. 5) The publications for which the price is staied are sold by the Superintendent of Documents, Government Printing Office, Wash.ington 25, D. C. Remittance to that official should be made by postal money order, ex- press order, or check; postage stamps will not be accepted. If additional references to geologic information on this area are required they may be obtained from "Bibliography of North American geology, " published as Bulletins 746, 747, 823, 937, 9�8, 949, 952, 958, and 968. ANNUAL REPORTS: '�Nineteenth, 1897-98. Part I contains: Triangulation and spirit leveling, by H. M. Vdilson and otliers, pp. 145-4Q8. Part III contains: Geology of the McAlester-Lehigh coal field, Indian Territory, by J. A. Taff, accompanied by a report on the fossil plaiits by David White, and a report on the Paleozoic invertebrate fossils by G. H. Girty, pp.423-600. �Twentieth, 1898-99. Part I contains: Triangulation and spirit leveling, by H. M. Wilson and others, pp-211-530. �Twenty-first, 1899-1900. Part II contains: Geology of the eastern Choctaw coal field, Indian Territory, by J..?.. Taff and G.I. Adams, pp. 257-311. Part IV contains: The High Plains and their utilization; by W. D. Johnson, pp-601-741. Part V contains: Woodland of Indian Territory, by C. H. Fitch, pp. 603-66Z. '�Twenty-second, 1900-1901. Part I contains: The asphalt and bituminous rock deposits of the United States, by G. H. Eldridge, pp. 209-452. Part III contains: The south- western cflal field, by J. A. Taff, pp. 367-413. Part IV contains: The High Plains and their utilization (conclusion of paper in Twenty-first Annual Report), by W. D. Johnson, pp.631-669. MONOGRAPH: �51. Cambrian Brachiopoda, by C. D. Walcott. 1912. Part I, 872 pp. ; Part II, 363 pp. GEOLI�GIC FOLIOS: �74. Coalgate, Indian Territory (Okla. ), by J. A. Taff. 1901. 6, [ 1] pp. , 4 maps. �79. Atoka, Indian Territory (Okla. ), by J. A. Tafi. 1902. 8, C3] pp. , 4 maps. �98. Tishomingo, Indian Territory (Okla. ), by J. A. Taff. 1903. 8, [ 1] pp. , 3 maps. '�122. Tahlequah, Ir_dian Territory (Okla. )-Ark. , by J. A. Taff. 1905. 7 pp. , 3 maps. '� 132. Mus�cogee, Indian Territory (Okla. ), by J. A. Taff. 1906. 8 pp. , 3 maps. � 154. Winslow, Ark. -Indian Territory (Okla. ), by A. H. Purdue. 19U7. 6, [ 1� pp. , Z maps. PROFESSIONAL PAPERS: �31. Preliminary report on the geology of the Arbuckle and Wichita Mountains, in Indian Territory and C�klahoma, by J. A. Taff. 1904. 97 pp. �100. Tn� coal fields of the United States, by M. R. Campbell and J. A. Bownocker. 1929. Contains: Gene:al introduction, by M.R. Campbell, pp. 1-33. �i20. Shorter contributions to general geology, 1918. Contains: A contribution to the geology of nortneastern Texas and southern Oklahorna, by L. W. Stephenson, pp.129-163. '�121. Helium-bearing natural pas, by G.S. Rogers. 19Z1. 113 pp. �128. Shorter contributions to general geology, 1920. Gontains: The origin of the faults, aaticlines, and buried "granite ridge" of the northern part of the Mid- Continent oil and gas field, by A. E. Fath, pp. 75-84. '�135. The composition of the river and lake waters of the United States, by F. W. Clarke. 19Z4. 199 pp. - 1 - PROFESSIONAL FAPERS--Continued. 154. Shorter contributions to general geology, 19Z8. Z99 pp. $1.50, Contains: Water-laid volcanic rocks of early Upper Cretaceous age in southwestern Arkansas, southeastern Oklahoma, and northeastern Texas, by C. S. Ross, H. D. Miser, and L. R`. Stephenson, pp. 175-20Z. 186-C. Fossil plants from the Stanle� shale and Jackfork sandstone in southeastern Oklahoma and western Arkansas, by David White. 1937. pp.43-67. lOc. BULLETINS: �175. � 184. �211. �2Z3. �225. �248. �258. �260. �340. �377. �380. �381 �4Z7. *52Z. �531. �541. �5a4. � 547. �564. �60Z. �606. �6z 1. �624. �629. �641. Triangulation and spirit leveling in Indian Territory (Okla. ), by C. H. Fitch. 1900. 141 pp. (See also Bulletin 5b4. ) Oil and gas fields of the western interior and northern Texas coal measures and of the Upper Cretacears and Tertiary of the western Gulf coast, by G.I. Adams. 1901. 64 pp. Stratigraphy and paleontology of the Upper Carboniferous rocks of the Kansas section, by G.I. Adams and others. 1903. 123 pp. Gypsum deposits in the United States, by G. I. Adams and others. 1904. 1Z9 pp. Contributions to economic geology, 1903. Contains: Reported gold deposits of the Wichita Mountains, Okla, , by H. F. Bain, pp. 120-122. A gazetteer of Indian Territory (Okla. ), by Henry Gannett. 1905. 70 pp. The origin of certain place names in the United States (second edition), by Henry Gannett. 1905. 334 pp, Contributions to economic geology, 1904. Contains: Progress of coal work in Indian Territory, by J. A. Taff, pp. 382-401; Notes on the geology of the Mus- kogee oil'field, Indian Territory, by J. A. Taff and M. K. Shaler, pp. 441-445. Contributions to economic geology, 1907, Part I. Contains: Mineral resources of northeastern Oklahoma, by C. E. Sieben�,hal, pp. 187-228. The fauna of the Caney shale of Oklahoma, by G. H. Girty. 1909. 106 pp. Contributions to economic geology, 1908, Part I. Contains: Grahamite deposits of southeastern Oklahoma, by J. A. Taff, pp. 286-297. Contributions to economic geology, 1908, Part II. Contains: Analys�es of crude petroleum from Oklahoma and Kansas, by D. T. Day, pp. 494-503; The Madill oil pool, Oklahoma, by J. A. Taff and W. J. Reed, pp. 504-513. Manganese deposits of the United States, with sections on foreign deposits, chemistry, and uses, by E. C. Har3er. 1910. 298 pp. Portland-cement rnaterials and industry in the United States, by E. C. E�kel and others. 1913. 401 pp. Contributions to ecor.omic geology, 1911, Part II. Contains: Oil and gas development in north-central Oklahoma, by R. H. Wood, pp. 27-53. Contributions to economic geology, 1912, Part II. Contains: Structure o: the Fort Smitl2-Poteau gas field, Arkansas-Oklahoma, by C. D. Smith pp. 23-33; The Glenn oil and gas pool and vicinity, Oklahoma, by C: D. Smith, pp. 34-48. The fauna of the Wewolca formation of Oklahoma, by G. H. Girty. 1915. 353 pp. Reconnaissance of the Grandfield district, �klahoma, by M. J. Munn. 1914. 85 pp. Results of spirit leveling in Oklahoma, 1895 to 1912. 119 pp. Anticlinal structure in parts of Cotton and Jefferson Counties, Okla. , by C. H. Wegemann, 1915. 108 pp. Origin of the zinc and lead deposits of the Joplin region, Missouri, Kansas, and Oklahoma, by C. E. Siebenthal. 1915. 283 pp. Contributions to economic geology, 1915, Part II. Contains: The Healdton oil field, Carter County, Okla. , by C. H. Wegemann and K. C. Heald, pp. 13-30; The Loco gas field, Stephens and Jefferson Counties, Okla, , by C. H. Wegemann, pp. 31-4Z; The Duncan gas field, Stephens County, Okla. , by C. H. Wegemann pp.43-50; The Lawton oil and gas field, Oklahoma, by C. H. Wegemann and R. W. Howell, pp. 71-85; Analyses of coal samples from various parts of the Ur�ited States, by M. R. Campbell and F. R. Clark, pp. 251-375. Us.eful minerals of the United States, compiled by F. C. Schrader and others. 1916. 412 pp. Natural gas resources of parts of north Texas. 1916. •Contains: Notes on the gas fields of central and southern Oklahoma, by C. H. Wegemann, pp. 121-126. Contributions to economic geology, 1916, Part II. Contains: The oil and gas geology of the Foraker quadrangle, (�sage County, Okla. , by K. C. Heald, pp. 17-47; An anticlinal fold near Billings, Noble County, Ok1a. , by A. E. Fath, pp.1Z1-138. - 2 - BULLETINS--C ontinued. �658. Geologic structure in the Cushing oil and gas field, Oklahoma, and its relation to the oil, gas, and water, by G. H.. Beal. 1917. 64 pp. �661. Contributions tc economic geology, 1917, Part II. Contains: Structure of the northern part of the Bristow quad.Fangle, Creek County, Okla. , with reference to petroleum and natural gas, by A. E. Fath, pp. 69-99. '�669. Salt resources of the United States, by W. C. Phalen. 1919. 284 pp. 686. Structure and oil and gas resources of the Osage Reservation, Okla. , by David White and others. 1922. 4Z7 pp. $1. 75. �691. Contributions to economic geOlogy, 1918, Part II. Contains: Geologic structure of the nor�hwestern part of the Pawhuska quadrangle, Okla. , by K. C. Heald, pp. 57-100. �697. Gypsum deposits of the United States, by R. W. Stone and others. 1920. 326 pp. �715. Contributions to economic geology, 1920, Part I. Contains: Permian salt deposits of the south-central United States, by N. H. Darton, pp. 205-Z30. �715. Contributions to economic geology, 19Z0, Part II. Contains: Natural-gas re- sources a��ailable to Dallas and oth�r cities of central north Texas, by E. W. Shaw and P. L. Ports, pp. 55-89. *7Z5. Contributions to economic geology, 19Z1, Part I. Contains; Manganese deposits near Bromide, Okla. , by D. F. Hewett, pp. 311-329. �726. Contributions to economic geology, 1921, Part II. Contains: Geology of the Cement oil field, Caddo County, Okla. , by Frank Reeves, pp.41-85; Geologic structure and oil and gas prospects of a part of Jefferson County, Okla. , by H. M. Robinson, pp. 277-302. �730. Contributions to the geography of the United States, 1922. Contains: Physiog- raphic provinces and sections in western Oklahoma and adjacent parts of Texas, by N. M. Fenneman, pp. 115-139. �736. Contributions to economic geology, 1922, Part II. Contains: The structure of the Madill-Denison area, Oklahoma and Texas, by O. B. Hopkins and others, pp. 1-33. �751. Contributions to economic geology, 1923-24, Part II. Contains: Progress re- port on a subsurface siudy of the Pershing oil and gas field, Osage County, Okla. , by W. W. Rubey, pp. 23-70. �759. Geology of the Bristow quadrangle, Creek County, Okla. , by A. E. r ath. 19Z5. �808. Geol gy of the De Queen and Caddo Gap quadrangles, Ark. , by H. D. Miser and A. H. Purdue. 1929. 195 pp. 874-A. Geology and fuel resources of the southern part of the Oklahoma coal field, Part I, The McAlester district, Pittsburg, Atoka, and Latimer Counties, by T. A. Hendricks. 1937. pp. 1-90. 65c. 874-B. Geology and fuelresources of the southern part of the Oklahoma coal field, Part 2, The Lehigh c3istrict, Coal, Atoka, and Pittsburg Counties, by M. M. Knechtel. 1937. pp.91-149. 20c. �874-C. Geology and fuel resources of the soutnern part of the Oklahoma coal field, Part 3, The Quinton-Scipio district, Pittsburg, Haskell, and Latimer Counties, by C. H. Dane, H. E. Rothrock, and d. S. Williams. 1938. pp. 151-253. 874-D. Geology and fuel resources of the southern part of the Oklahoma coal field, Part 4, The Howe-Wilburton district, Latimer and Le Flore Gounties, by T. �. Hendricks. 1939. pp. 255-300. 70c. 886-A. Possibility of new oil pools in the Siliceous lime and Bartlesville sand in T. 23 N. , R. 10 E. , Osage County, Okla. , by N. W. Bass and others. 1936, pp. 1-4 5c. �896. Lexicon of geologic names of the United States (including Alaska), by M. G. Wilmarth. 1938. Part I, A-L, pp. L-1244; Part 2, M-Z, pp.'1245-2396. '�900-A. Subsurface geology and oil and gas resources of Osage County, Okla. , Part 1, Tps. Z2 and Z3 N. , Rs. 10 and 11 E. , by N. W. Bass and �thers. 1938. pp. 1-45. 900-B. Subsurface geology and oil and gas resources of Osage County, Olcla. , Part Z, Tps. Z2 and 23 N. , Rs. 8 and 9 E. , by C. T. Kirk and others. 1939. pp.47-82. 40c. 900-G. Subsurface geology and oil and gas resources of Osage Gounty, Okla. , Part 3, Tps. Z4 and 25 N. , Rs. 8 and 9 E. , by N. W. Bass and others. 1939. pp. 83- 1Z9. 4oc. - 3 - BULLETINS - -G ontiniied 900-D. Subsurface geology and oil and gas resources of Osage Gounty, Okla. , Yart 4, Tps.24 and 25 N., Rs. 10 and 11 E., by L.E. Kennedy and others. 1940. pp. 131-171. 35c. 900-E. Subsurface geology and oil and gas resources of Osage County, Okla. , Part 5, Tps. 26 and 27 N. , Rs. 10 and 11 E. , by L. E. Kennedy and others. 1940. gp. 173-Z08. 40c. 900-F. Subsurface geology and oil and gas resources of Osage Gounty, Okla. , Part &; T. Z8 N. , Rs. 10 and 11 E. ,� and T. 29 N. , Rs. 9 to 11 E. , by H. H. Goodrich and others. 1940, pp.209-Z36o 50c. 90Q-G. Subsurface geology and oil and gas resources of Osage County, Okla. , Part 7, Tps. 20 and 21 N. , Rs. 11 and 12 E. , by W. R. Dillard and others. 1941. pp. 237-268. 30c. 900-H. Suhsurface geology and oil and gas resources of Osage County, Okla. , Part &�, ' Parts of T. 20 N. , Rs. 9 and 10 E. , and T. 21 N. , Rs. 8 and 9 E. , and all of T. 21 N. , R. 10 E. , by C. T. Kirk and others. 1941. pp. 269-302. 35c. 900-I. Subsurface geology and oil and gas resources of Osage Gounty, Okla. , Part 9, Tps. 23 and 24 N. , R. 7 E. , by N. W. Bass and others. 1941. pp. 303-319. Z5c. 900-J. Subsurface geology an3 oil and gas resources of Osage County, Okla. , Part 10, Burbank and South Burbank oil fiel.ds, Tps. 26 and 27 N. , R. 5E. , and Tps. 25 to 27 N. , R. 6 E. , by N. W. Bass and others. 1942. pp. 32,1-342,. 60c. 900-K. Subsuriace geology and oil and gas resources of Osage County, Okla. , Part 11, Summary of subsurface geology with special reference to oil and gas, by N, W. Bass. 1942. pp. 343-393. 45c. '�928-C. Adsorbent clays, their distribution, properties, production, and uses, by P. G. Nutting. 1943. pp. 1Z7-221. Information on altitudes in the United States is contained in Bulletins �5, �76, '�160, �274, '�689, and �817. Information on boundaries and areas of the United States, the several states, and terri- taries with historical outlines of boundary cranges is contained in Bulletins '� 13, # 171, '�226, *30Z, '�689, and �817. Information on results of primary triangulation and primary traverse is contained in Builetins '�310, '�440, '�644, and #709. WATER-SUPPLY PAPERS: �44. Profiles of rivers in the United States, by �3enry Gannett. 1901. 100 pp. '�147. Destructive floods in the United States in 1904. Contains: Canadian River basin flood, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Indian Territory, from report of F. S. Dobson and G. B. Monk, pp. 210-130. '�148. Geology and water resources o� Oklahoma, by C. Pd. Gould. 1905. 178 pp. '�149. Preliminary list of deep borings in the United States (2d edition, with additions), by N.H. Darton, 1905. 175 pp. �238. The public utility of water powers and their gov: rnmental regulation, by Rene - Tavernier and M.O. Leighton. 1910. 161 pp. *274. Some stream waters of the �Hestern Ur_ited States, by Herman Stabler. 1911. 188 pp. '�340. Stream-gaging stations and publications relating to water resources, 1885-1913, • by B. D. Wood. 195 pp. �345. Gontributions to the hydrology of the Ur_ited States, 1914. Contains: Grou.nd water for irrigation in the vicinity of Enid, Okla. , by .A. T. Schwennesen. pp. 11-23; Ground water for irrigation in the valley of North Fork of Canadian River near Oklahoma City, Okla. , by A. T. Schwennesen, pp.41-51. �364. Water analyses from the laboratory of the United States Geological Survey, tabulated by F. W. Clarke. 1914. 40 pp. �500. Contributions to the hydrology of the United States, 1921. Contains: Ground water for irrigation near Gage, Ellis Gounty, Okla. , by D. G. Thompson, pp. 33 -53. 5Z0-B. Additional ground-water supplies for the city of Enid, Okla. , by B. C. Renick. 19Z5. pp. 15-26. 5c. 658. The industrial utility of public water supplies in the United States, 1932, by W. D. Collins, W. L. Lamar, and E. W. Lohr. 1934. 135 pp. 35c. �659. Contributions to the hydrology of the United States, 193Z. Contains: Index of analyses of natural waters in the United States, 19Z6 to 1931, by W. D. Collins and C. S. Howard, pp. 191 -Z09. - 4 - N W 1� a � CI� c W N z � r,. I�NITED STATES UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR GEOLOGICAL SURVEY INDEX TO TOPOGRAPHIC MAPS OF THE UNITED STATES AT THE SCALE OF 1:250,000 The Geological Survey is publishing and distributing a series of reconnaissance topographic maps of the United States at the scale of 1250,000 (1 inch —approximately 4 miles). The initial issues of these maps were printed from basic compilations prepared by the Army Map Service for military requirements. The source data comprised basic topographic maps of the Geological Survey and other agencies, aerial photography, state highway maps, county maps, and other available information. The maps are generally published in quadrangle units of 1 degree in latitude by 2 degrees in longitude, and cover areas ranging from 6400 to about 8000 square miles, depending upon the latitude of the individual areas. Each map is designated by the name of the most prominent city, town, or natural feature within it, and in the lower margin of the map a diagram shows the positions and names of adjoining quadrangles. This series of reconnaissance maps is printed in the conventional colors: cultural features, such as roads, railroads, cities, towns, and lettering, are printed in black; water features in blue; features of relief, such as hills, mountains, and valleys, are shown by brown contour lines, and in some cases by the addition of relief shading. The contour interval varies from 25 feet, for areas where the terrain is relatively flat, to 500 feet for mountainous regions. Highway classification and public land lines are shown in red; urban areas are covered by a yellow tint, and woodland, which is shown on selected maps, by green tint. The maps of this series are approximately 24 by 34 inches in size, and the area covered by each is outlined in red on the accompanying index. Quadrangles for which published maps are now available have the map name printed in red. Those maps which are in process of compilation or will be undertaken in the near future are shown by outline only. The price of each map is 50 cents per copy, but a 20 percent discount is allowed when an order amounts to $10 or more at the retail price. Prepayment is required and may be made by money order or check, payable to the Geological Survey, or in cash —the exact amount—at the sender's risk. Maps covering areas in the states west of the Mississippi River, and includixg all of Louisiana and Minnesota may be ordered directly from the Geological Survey, Federal Center, Denver 15, Colorado, where a distribution center for these states is maintained. Maps for areas east of the Mississippi River should be ordered from the Geological Survey, Washington 25, D. C. The Geological Survey does not supply mounted maps. More detailed information concerning maps in general may be obtained from the Map Information Ofiice, C'7eological Survey, Washington 25, D. C. June 1953 3-2, 500 MAPS OF THE UNITED STATES BASE MAPS: A wall map, showing state and county boundaries, names of towns, and water features . Insets show Alaska� Hawaii, Canal Zone, Puerto Rico, and Virgin Islands. 2 sheets, each 41 by 51 inches (when trimmed and assembled to make a single sheet, 51 by 78 inches). Scale, about 40 miles to the inch. 1932. Price, $1. Shows state and county boundaries and names, and water features, 27 by 42 inches. Scale, about 80 miles to the inch. 1933. Price, 25 cents. Shows state and county boundaries and names (in black), and water features (in blue). 27 by 42 inches. Scale, about 80 miles to the inch. 1933. Price, 25 cents. Shows state boundaries and names (in black), county boundaries and names and water features (in blue). 27 by 42 inches. Scale, about 80 miles to the inch. 1933. Price, 25 cents. Shows state boundaries, principal cities, and water features. 20 by 30 inches. Scale, about 110 miles to the inch. 19I6. Price, 15 cents. Shows state boundaries, principal cities, and water features. 13 by 19 inches. Scale, about 190 miles to the inch. 1906. Price, 5 cents. Shows state boundaries, principal cities, and water features. 9% by 13 inches. Scale, about 260 miles to the inch. 1911. Price, 1 cent. CONTOUA MAP: Shows altitude, state boundaries, principal cities, and water features. 20 by 30 inches. Scale, about 110 miles to the inch. 1916. Price, 15 cents. GEOLOGIC MAP: This map represents the results of more than 50 years of geologic exploration and mapping by the Federal Geological Survey, the state surveys, other organizations, and independent geologists. It is principally a wall map but con- tains sufficient detail to be valuable also for desk study. More than 160 rock units are distinguished by patterns printed in 23 colors. 4 sheets, each 27 by 47 inches (when trimmed and assembled to make a single sheet, 51 by 90 inches). Scale, about 40 miles to the inch. 1933. Price, $2.50; no discount allowed. OIL AND GAS MAPS: A wall map, showing oil and gas fields, areas of oil shale and basement rocks, and the approximate boundary of the Continental Shelf. 2 sheets, each 41 by 52 inches �when trimmed and assembled to make a single sheet, 52 by 80 inches). Scale, about 40 miles to the inch. 1951. Price, $1.50; no discount allowed. A wall map, showing oil and gas fields, pipe lines, and refining centers. 2 sheets, each 42 by 52 inches (when trimmed and assembled to make a single sheet, 52 by 81 inches). Scale, about 40 miles to the inch. 1946. Price, $1.50. OUTLINE MAP: Shows state boundaries and names only. 27 by 42 inches. Scale, about 80 miles to the inch. 1940. Price, 25 cents. PHYSICAL DIVISIONS: Shows physical divisions outlined in red on a base map 20 by 30 inches. Subdivisions and characteristics of each are listed on the margin. VJithout contours. 28 by 32 inches. Scale, about 110 miles to the inch. 1946. Price, 10 cents. RELIEF MAPS: A wall map, showing state boundaries, principal cities, water features, and relative height of land and depth of sea. 44 by 64 inches. Scale, 50 miles to the inch. 1920. Price, 75 cents. Shows altitude by contour lines and color tints, state boundaries, principal cities, and water features. 20 by 30 inches. Scale, about 110 miles to the inch. 1916. Price, 15 cents. STATUSINDEX MAPS: A series of maps showing the status of various phases of mapping in the United States. Each map is accompanied by a text which gives a detailed explanation. Scale, about 80 miles to the inch. Size, 28 by 42 inches. Free on appli- cation to the Geological Survey. Washington 25, D. C. The following maps are available: Aerial Mosaics of the United States. Shows all areas in the United States for which mosaics or photo maps have been prepared from aerial photographs, scale of negatives, dates of photography, and agencies from which copies may be obtained. Color patterns indicate the holdings of the various Federal and state agencies and com- mercial firms that have reported their coverage to date. 1962. Aerial Photography of the United States. The fifth edition of an index showing the status of aerial photography, areas that have been photographed, and agencies holding the film. Coverage of aerial photography is shown to the extent known only if reproductions are generally available for purchase. 1951. Geologic Mapping in the United States. Shows by color patterns the areas covered by published geologic maps, and areas in which geologic mapping is in progress in the United States, its territories and possessions. 1951. Horizontal Control in the United States. Shows the extent of horizontal control established by Federal agencies in the United States, its territories and possessions. 1952. Vertical Control in the United States. Shows the extent of vertical control established by Federal agencies in the United States, its territories and possessions. 1952. Topographic Mapping in the United States. The third edition of an index showing the status of topographic mapping in the United States, its territories and possessions. Shows mapping, both topographic and plani- metric, by the Geological Survey and other Federal agencies. A general appraisal of the adequacy of these maps is indicated by color patterns. 1962. UNITED STATES I�F.YART�ZEl\ T OF Tf3:E INTFRIO�� GEOLOCsICAL �U��VEY TOPOGRAI'HIC MAPS The United States Ueological Survey ti�as created by an Act of Cbngress in 1879, for the purpose of making a systematic study of the geology and natural resources of the United States, and the classification of the public lands. F'rom the �•ery he�inning of this work it was evident that no adequate classification of lands or conclusive �eologic determinations could be made without suitable base maps. This led to the organization of the `Topo- graphic Division, ���hich, since 1882, has been engaged in makin� a series of standard t<}po- graphic. maps to cover the United States, Alaska, Hawaii, and Puerto Rico. MAP SCALE Under the general plan adopted each published map covers a quadrangle of area, bounded by parallels of latitude and meridians of longitude, and hence the maps are some- times referred to as quadrangles, or quadrangle maps. The map boundaries of parallels and meridians are based on the international system of latitude and longitude by �vhich the location of any point on the surface of the earth is readily� fixed. Ttie quadrangle maps are published on dif��erent scales, the map scale selected for each section ot the country being, for economic reasons, the smallest scale adequate for general use in the� development of each part of the country. On the lo�ver margin of each map are printed graphic scales showing distances in fcet, miles, and kilometers. In addition, the scale of the map is shown by a fraction expressing a fixed ratio between linear measurements on the map and cor- responding distances on the ground. For example, the scale of 1:62,500 means that one unit (such as 1 inch, 1 foot, or 1 meter) on the map represents G2,500 of the same units on the earth's surface. The scale of "1 inch equals 1 mile" means that 1 inch on the published map corresponds exactly to 1 mile on the ground. Each quadrangle map is usuallv designated bv the name of a city, town, or prominent natural feature �vithin it, and on the margins of the map ai•e printed the names of adjoining maps that have been published. The adjoining maps are published at the same scale, unless oiher�vise noted. FEATURES OF A TOPOGRAPHIC MAP Topo�raphy is the configuration or shape of the land surface. A topo�raphic map is a graphic representation of the configuration or shape of a part of the earth's surface, and it is this distinctive feature that dif�erentiates it fr�m other maps. Topography may be shown by several methods. The most strilcing and realistic method is probably the familiar relief model formerly made of plaster or clay, now sometimes made of rubber or plastic. The ordinary topographic map is printed on a Hat sheet of paper, and hence a symbol must be used to depict the topography. 'I'here are se��eral such symbols in use, including ha- chures, shading, and contours. The contour method is used almost entirely by the Geo- logical Survey, although a few maps have been published with relief shading overprinted on the contours. Gontours are superior to other topographic symbols for engineering needs, because they generally af3�ord more precise information. Contours make it practical to represent the form of the land surface with high precision. The height of each hill, the depth of each valley, and, in fact, the elevation and slope of the ground at any point can be determined from a good contour map. A contour inay be defined as an imaginary line on thc: ground, every part of �vhich is at the same altitude, or elevation, above sea level. The shore line of any relatively stable body of water, as the sea or a lake, is, in efFect, a contour. If the level of the water rises or falls by any amount, the water's edge conforms to the shape of the land at the ne�v level and iraces out a new contour. Contour lines could be dra.wn at an}� elevation, but in practice only the contours at certain re,ular intervals of elevation are shown. The con- tour interval, or the vertical distance between one contour and the next, is selected ac- cording to the steepness of the terrain in the area being mapped. In flat country it �vill usually be 5 feet, occasionally less. In a mountainous region it may be as great as 50 feet, sometimes more. To make the contours easier to read and follow, every fifth one (usually) is made heavier than the others (accentuated), and is accompanied by figures sho�ving the altitude of the contours above sea level. The contour interval used on each map sheet is explained in a note printed in the botto:n margin of the map. In addition to the contour lines and elevation nuinbers, the heights of many identifiable points, such as road intersections, summits, and surfaces of lakes, are shown on the map in printed figures giving altitudes to the nearest foot, except on the Puerto Rican maps, where contour intervals in meters are used, and individual heights are gicen to the nearest meter or tenth of ineter. These individual elevations are commonly called spot heights, or spot ele��ations. The information shown on topographic maps may be divided into three general classes. The first class includes all water features such as the ocean, lakes, rivers, glaciers, canals, swamps, and other bodies of water. These are known as the hydrographic features, and are printed on the map in blue. The second class of features includes all the works of man, such as roads, trails, dams, transmission lines, buildin�s, airports, railroads, bench marks, civil boundaries, and lettering. These are sometimes called the culture, or cultizral features, and are shown on the map in black. The third classification comprises the confi�uration and elevation of the� tPrrain, including the mountains, hills, plateaus, valleys, and all other natural features that form the land surface. These features, c.omprising the topography, are sometime� called the hypsographic features, signifying heights, and are printed on the map in brown. In addition to these general classifications, certain maps carry other information, printe.d iii other colors. Large bodies of water are usually shown with a light blue tint, or �vith the conventional blue water lining. Several varieties of stipples, �vhich are patterns of closely spaced dots, or hachure lines, printed in red, and simulating dif�'erent shades of pink tiiit, are sometimes utilized in narrow strips for emphasis alongside such features as State, county, city, and Federal-reservation boundaries. A light red or gray tint is some- times overprinted on the closely built-up areas of cities, and indicates that only the land- mark or other important buildings are sho�vn within the tinted areas. A solid red color has been used on recent maps for clarity and emphasis of certain cultural features, includin� the classification of the surfacings of higher-type roads, and the subdivision lines of the townships, ranges, square-mile sections, and land grants in the States subdivided by the public land surveys. On the more recent maps, a green tint is used to show wooded areas, scrub, orchards, and vineyards. The ,green overprinting is made only on a limited num- ber of the published maps, because it is not required by all map users. In ordering maps "woodland" copies should be requested if they are desired, as they are furnished only upon specifrc request. Accompanying this text is a set of the symbols, printed in appropriate colors, most commonly used on modern topographic maps There is also sho�ti�n a small sketch and map of a typical area, illustrating the use of contours in a variety of topographic forms. NATIONAL TOPOGRAPHIC MAP SERIES Although some areas are surveyed and some maps are compiled and publishec� on different scales for special purposes, the standard topograpl_zic sur��eys and the resulting maps of the continental United States have for many years been of three general types, diH'erentiated as follo�vs: 1. Surveys of areas in which there are problems of great public importance—relatin;, for example, to metropolitan and industrial areas, mineral development, dam and reser- voir projects, irrigation, or reclamation of swamp areas—are made with sut�icient detail to be used in the publication of maps on a scale of either 1:24,000 (1 inch=2,000 feet) or 1:31,680 (1 inch=% mile), with a contour interval of 1 foot to 50 feet, the contour in- terval varying from area to area according to the steepness of the terrain. Quadran�le maps published on these scales measure 7% minutes in both latitude (north-south) and lon�itude (east-west), and cover an area ranging from 49 square miles in the northern latitudes along the Canadian border, to G8 square miles in the southernmost latitudes of Texas and Florida. The usual and preferred publication scale for the 7,'.2-minute quad- rangle maps is 1: 24,000. The 1: 31,680 scale will be continued temporarily only in a few localities where status of previously published maps or other local circumstances make the use of the 1:24,000 scale inadvisable for the time being. 2. Surveys of areas in which there are problems of average public importance, as in much of the agricultural land of the Mississippi Basin, are made with suf�icient detail to be used in the publication of maps on a scale of 1:62,500 (1 inch=nearly 1 mile), with a contour interval of 5 to 100 feet. Quadrangle maps published on this scale measure 15 minutes in both latitude and lon�itude, and each map covers an area of 195 to 271 square miles, the area depending on the latirude. One of the objectives of the Geological Survey- is ultiniately to supply a complete atlas of 15-minute topographic quadrangle maps, at ttie scale of 1:62,500, of the entire area of the continental United States. 3. Surveys of areas in which the development problems are regarded as of less magni- tude or urgency, such as certain of the desert regions of the West, �vere formerly made with only generalized detail, and the resultin� maps were published on a scale of either 1:125,000 (1 inch=nearly 2 miles) or 1:250,000 (1 inch=nearly 4 miles), with a contour interval of 20 to 250 feet. Quadran�le maps published on the scale of,l: 125,000 measure 30 minutes in both latitude and lon�itude and each map covers an area of 790 to 1,084 square miles. I�1aps pubiished on the scale of 1: 250,000 measure 1 degree in eac.h direction, and each map covers an area of 3,120 to 4,336 square miles. A new series of generalized topographic maps, planned to cover the entire area of the United States, on a scale of 1:250,0f)0, �vith contour intervals ranging from 100 feet in the plains areas to 500 feet in the mountains, with relief emphasized by shading, is no�ti� in proc- ess of preparation and publication. This series, which will require several years to com- plete, is intended primarily to meet military requirements, and ori�inal compilation is bein� done mainly by the Department of the Army. An edition for civilian use is planned to follow the military edition of each of these maps, as such maps �vill be found usefizl for geographic information and for general planning on a regional basis. All of the standard quadrangle maps of the United States areas are published on sheets about 16'2 by 20 inches in size, except for the 1:24,000 scale maps, �vhich are 22 by 27 inches. AERIAI. PHOTOGRAPHS USED IN MODERN MAPPING The technical proc.edures of topographic mapping have undergone considerable change in recent ye.ars. Aerial photographs, and precise plotting instruments for measuring and converting these photo�raphs to standard maps, now perform a major function in nearly all topographic mapping operations. The use of aer�al photographs makes it economically practical to prepare the entire series of standard tc�pographic map sheets in conformance with modern engineering standards of accuracy. Although in using aerial photographs each original map sheet is "compiled" in the ofTice, extensi��e field surveys are still required— first for determining the latitude, longitude, and elevation of a number of control-survey points within each map-sheet area, and second, for checking aiid completing the map in the field. Each office-compiled map sheet, if it is to be of standard quality, must be taken to the field, in order to complete all those features which the photographs do not show— such, for example, as place and feature names, political boundaries and land-subdivision lines, classification of roads and buildings, and numerous small but important features including mines, quarries, cemeteries, large springs, and oil �vells. It is also necessary that the field engineer complete the map by conventional surveys whenever the land surface is completely hidden from camera view by dense forest growth. MAP ACCURACY SPECIFICATIONS Specifications for horizontal and vertical accuracy were adopted in 1942 for the stand- ard topographic maps, and those maps which fulfill these accuracy requireme,nts carry a notation to that effect in the lower margin. The main features of these specifications pro- vide that (1) horizontally, 90 perc.ent of the well-defined planimetric features shall be plotted in correct position on the published map sheet within a tolerance of ;o inch; and (2) vertically, 90 percent of the elevations interpolated from the contours shall be correct with- in a tolerance of one-half contour interval. (The %o inch tolerance for horizontal pasition accuracy of �vell-defined planimetric features is equivalent approximately to 40 feet on the ground for maps published on the 1:24,000 scale, and 100 feet on the ground for the 1:62,500 scale.) STATE PLANE GOORDINATE SYSTEMS State plane coordinate systems have been established for each of the 48 States, under the sponsorship of the United States Coast and Geodetic Survey. These are rectangular coordinate systems, or grids, by which engineers and surveyors can readily correlate their plane surveys to the �eodetic survey stations. Plane surveys do not take account of the curvature of the earth's surface, and so cannot be extended accurately over great distances. Geodetic procedures are necessary for all surveys that cover large areas or extend over long distances. Geodetic stations are monumented points, for which precise latitudes and longi- tudes have been determined. These geodetic positions, referred to the sphere of the earth, can be readily converted into plane, rectangular coordinates of any State system, and vice versa. On all recent topographic maps certain of the grid lines of the State rectangular coordinate system may be drawn, by joining with straight lines the corresponding grid ticks, or short sections of lines, which extend at regular inter�-als just outside the map border, and which are labeled with appropriate north and east coordinate values in feet. In cases where State grid zones overlap, two or more systems will be shown on the map, in which case one zone will have its grid ticks indicated by dotted lines. EXTENT OF AR�AS MAPPED For the United States proper, nearly 10,000 topographic. maps, and several hundred planimetric maps (maps that do not depict relief), have been published and are available to the public. Some of these maps were originally prepared by other agencies, including the Tennessee Valley Authority, the Department of the Army, the United States Forest Service, and the Goast and Ueodetic Sur�ey. All of these maps are now distributed by the Geological Survey, and most of them have been edited and published by the Survey. 3' These maps in total prc�vide topographic information for nearly 50 percent of tlie continental United States. However, only a part of these maps, covering about one-fourth of the coun- try, are considered to be adequate for modern needs. The remainder of the topo�raphic maps, c.overing another one-fourth of the countiy, are older, less accurate, or less c.omplete, so much that they are not fully adequate for modern needs. The territory of Alaska has about 44 percent of its area covered by reconnaissance- type maps, of �vhich a small portion is on n scale of 1:500,000 (i inch=nearly 8 miles), with most of the remainder on the scale of 1:250,000. A few areas of particular economic importance are covered by more accurate and detailed maps on a scale of 1:62,500, and some are on larger scales. A new pattern for the layout of the quadrangle maps of Alaska was adopted in 1948, and all future Alaska map sheets will conform to this pattern in format, so as to provide a coordinated series of topographic maps for the entire territory. The Hawaiian Islands have been completery surveyed, and the resulting maps are pub- lished on a scale of 1:62,500. Puerto Rico has also been completely survey�ed and several series of topographic maps have been publishe�, the main series being on a scale of 1:30,000 (1 inch=nearly'z mile). OTHER MAPS AVAILABLE In addition to the standard series of quadrangle maps, the Geological Survey produces and publishes topographic maps of special format for certain areas of unusual interest, in- cluding the national parks and several intensively developed mining areas. These maps are published on various scales, depending on the size of the area included and the probable use. l�lany of them carry a descriptive statement, and some of the maps of national parks and monument areas are available with relief shading as �vell as contours. Many of the principal river courses and their flood-plain areas have been topographically surveyed, from which strip maps, known as river survey maps, have been prepared and. published, usually at the scale of 1:24,000. These maps show in considerable detail the course and fall of the stream, the topography throughout the flood-plain area, selected dam sites, stream profiles, and other features. Base maps of all of the States have been published on the scale of both 1:500,000 and 1:1,000,000. The State base maps ordinarily sho�v only such features as the boundaries of States, counties, and Federal reservations; the principal cities, railroads, and highways; and the larger rivers and lakes. In some States revisions are being prepared which will provide special editions with contours and relief shading. For Alaska, base maps at four difi'ererrt scales are available, the most popular of these being Alaska map E, on the scale of 1:2, 500,000. For the United States as a whole, there are available several series of base maps, con- tour maps, and relief maps, on difTerent scales, and with varying amounts of information. STATE INDEX CIRCULARS Index maps and circulars of each State, and of Alaska, Hawaii, and Puerto Rico, showing the areas covered by topographic and planimetric maps available for public distribution, may be obtained free. Copies of the standard topographic maps may be ob- tained for 20 cents each; river survey maps are 10 cents per sheet; and special maps are available at difi�erent prices which are usually stated in the respective State index circulars. A discount of 20 percent is allo�ved on orders for maps amounting to $10 or more at the retail price. Orders for maps should be addressed to the United States Geological Survey, Wash- ington 25, D. C. (or to Denver 15, Golo., for maps of areas west of the Mississippi). Prepay- ment is required and may be made by money order or check, payable to the Director of the Geological Survey, or in cash—the exact amount—at the sender's risk. MAP INFORI�SATION OFFIGE For some years the Geological Survey has maintained a service unit that assembles and distributes information concerning the availability of maps, aerial photographs, and geo- detic control. The Map Information Of�ice w�as first organized to service the Federal surveying and map-making agencies, and was later expanded to serve the requirements of all map users. P'or information concerning the availability of maps, aerial photographs, geodetic control, and related data, write to the Map Information Qffice, United States Geological Survey, Washington 25, D. C. Prixited May 19�i0 FREE ON APPLiCATION TO THE DIRECTGR, GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, WASHINGTON 25, D. C. 4 TOPOGRAPHIC MAP SYM�OLS VARIATIONS WILL BE FOUND ON OLDER MAPS ROADS Hard surface, heavy duty, four or more lanes wide........... ................._....... . .... ............._.. ._...... ..._.. .... Hard surface, heavy duty, two or three lanes wid e .................................................. . ..... ...................................................... Hard surface, medium duty, four or more laneswide .................................................................................................-�--l-� Hard surface, medium duty, two or three laneswide .........................................................._.............._..................a-�--= _ Loose surface, graded, and drained or hard surface less than 16 feet in width .................................... s___ Improveddirt ......................................................................................._ -_-_ Unimproveddirt .................................................................................___________-_- Trail............................................................................................................... _. ...---------- Dual highway with dividing strip 25 feet or lessin width ............................................................................................ -- - Dual highway with width of dividing strip exceeding25 feet ............................................................................. Under construction-if classification is known appropriate width and red fill are shown .................__-_-__: _._:: Private roads are sometimes labeled for clarity........................................................................................................... PR��ArE Traffic circle-Clover leaf .......................................................... ;��....................)�( RAILROADS U. S. Standard Gage Singletrack ............................_..___......_._..._..................................-, � � �- Multiple main line track. If more than 2 tracks, number is shown by labeling ............................�-�-� Abandonedtrack ..............................................................................�-�--�--� Track under construction .......................................................... .T� � Juxta position .........................................................................................� Yards-Siding ......................_..........................................................-��.— --� �� Narrow Gage Singletrack ............... ......................... . ................ . ......., , Multipletrack ........................................................................................��,r_ Abandonedtrack ................................................................................�T�� Miscellaneous Carline...._........ ... _ . ..... ..... ... .......... .. ........................�, Railroadin street ............................................................................... Dismantled railroad or carline .............................................___._________.__ Turntable and roundhouse .....................................................___�___,� BRIDGES -TUNNELS-CROSSINGS Bridge, road .................................................................:.......................... Drawbridge, road ................................................................................ Footbridge..............................................................._..........._..................-- -- Tunnel, road ........................................................................................... _____� MINE SYMBOLS Openpit or quarry ............................................................................ x Shaft-Tunnel entrance .............................................................. o.......................1' Prospect......................._.....................................__................................. x CONTROL DATA Triangulation or transit traverse station .................... � , monumented with spirit level elev ......................... eMo�o�z with vertical angle elevation .............__............_.......... vnaMo22ao with other checked elevation ....................................... 056�5 Monumented bench mark with spirit level elev. BMxgSs with vertical angle elevation .......................................... vnBMxi254 Less �ermanently marked bench mark with spirit level elevation ................................................. x62a Checked spot elevation ..............................._.............................. 59z4 Unchecked spot elevation-Waterelevation............_ ; �F,:�� ..............8,0 HYPSOGRAPHIC FEATURES Index contour .........................................................................................— Intermediate contour ......................................................................-- Supplementarycontour ............................................................... ... ..... ........... ....... Depression contours ......................... Cu t .............................................................................. FiI I .............................................................................. Levee........................................................................ Levee with road ............................................. Large earth dam or levee ............. Wash .......................................... Tailings............................................................................. Tailingspond....__ .................................................... Strip mine,waste area....... � -. .� _- _ . � . '�" , �/,;� � Minedump._ ........................................................................................... Gravelbeach....._ .................................... .................._.................. � .�°�: : Distorted surface area ....................._.............__........................�� Sand area, sand dunes ................................................................�� FORESHORE-OFFSHORE FEATURES ,. ... Foreshoreflat ............................................................................... . -`_- Rock or coral reef .............................................................................. �-��� ��� Piling, dolphin, stump, snag ................................................... o Rock bare or awash at low tide ........................................... Rock bare or awash at low tide dangerous to navigation.................................................................................................. � *: Bridge, railroad ............................................:......................................� Drawbridge, railroad ...................................................................... Tunnel, railroad ...................................................................................-�-�______: � Overpass, underpass ..................................................._.............- t II � II _ _ Ford� Ford, road ..............._............._................................................................. --_ =Fd =— � -Fy- Ferr...................................__.._...__........................................................_. y __ Ferry__ DAMS-PIERS-BREAKWATERS Important small masonry or earth dam ...................... �1 Large masonry dams ..................................................................... 4�+ , „ Damwith lock ..................................................................................... Dam carrying road ........................................................................... — „ Breakwater, jetty, Pier, wharf ................................................ �' Covered pier or wharf .................................................................... � Seawall............................................................................................:........... _ Canalwith lock.........._ ......................__....... ..._......_._............_._---�--- MISCELLANEOUS CULTURE SYMBOLS Buildings (dwelling, place of employment, etc.). .� d 0 r-� r___"� School-Church-Cemetery .................._........................_.r: �t� �Cem � Buildings (barn, warehouse, etc.) .....................................o 0 0�� Cliffdwelling ......................................_......_.................................... o Sewage disposal or filtration plant ..................................� � � Power transmission line ..... ......................._............................-•----•----•----•- Telephone, telegraph, tramway, pipe line, etc. (labeled as to typej .........................................................................--------- Wells other than water (labeled as to type)........... �o�i oGas Tanks; oil, water, etc. (labeled as to type) ............... • �Water Located or landmark object........_....._......__ ..................... o Windmill-Gaging station ......................................................... �w�dm�ii m Gaging Sta BOUNDARIES National....................................................................................................----- State............................................................................................................----- County, Parish, municipio ......................................................._---- Civil township, precinct, town, barrio ..........................----_ Incorporated city, village, town, hamlet ....................._____________ Reservation, national or state .............................................—.—.— Landgrant............_.._......._......._ ..................................................... Small park, cemetery, airport, etc .................................__________________ U. S. land survey township or range line ................ Towr�ship or range line: location doubtful ............._________ U. S. land survey section line........_........__ .................... Section line: location doubtful......._._ .............................__________ Township line (not U. S. land survey) ............................................... Section line (not U. S. land survey) ......................._... ._.... ......__.__....._.. Found section corner- Land grant monument + ....................o Boundary monument-U.S. mineral monument o ................... Exposedwreck ...................................................................................... � Sunken wreck with masts exposed ................................. <� Depthcurve_......._...._...........__....._ ....................................................---__- HYDROGRAPHIC FEATURES � Perennial streams..........._ ............................._..__............._...........� � . _i Intermittent streams ...................................................._................ .>%_. :. Stream disappearing at definite point .........................i�-_�_ ` Intermittent lake or pond .......................................................... ��__ ' !". �� Drylake or pond . ........................................................................... `.��_�: Canal, flume, or aqueduct ........................................................ Aqueducttunnel .................................................................................---�______� Elevatedconduit .................................................................................—r---�- Waterwell-Spring .......................................................................... o...................�- _. ..._ _=_ - - - arge rapids ...........................................................................................z _�y== Smallrapids ...........................................................................................--�---- ___--.�---- -,,,,,,. ...... �- Largefalls ................................................................................ Smallfalls .................................................................................................. � ---------- Channel in water area ...................................................................---------- __.,�� ���. r�. . �-� �.= .. Glacier or permanent snowfield ........................................ ' -- ,. _ : Marsh or swam - p ................................................................................. - - - = -_ .-.,,- _ _ � - -_ .. -_ ., � ._ -.�.._., Wooded marsh or swamp ......................................................... -.,4. �,,_ .�._ :,;. __. - �_ ,.- _. Submer ed marsh or swam � �" � g P ................................................. - : _ Land subject to inundation ....................................................__________ �� ,: �a, °,�',.• �� a��c�, ����� Mangrove.................._.........................._............................_..................... ° _ , . OVERPRINTED AREAS Area in which only landmark buildings are shown..........._.._........_ .................................___ _...................................� Woods-brushwood ...............................................__...... . _..........� Orchard......................................................................................................� Vineya rd .............................................__................ ...................................� Scrub .......................... ................._............................................................� LETTERING STYLES Place, feature, boundary line, and area names R1ChVleW, Union Sch, MADISON CO3 �i Fi D A R Public works-Descriptive notes ST LOUIS, ROaD, BELLE STREET, i�unnel - Golf Course, Radio Tower Control data-Elevation figures-Contour numbers Florey Knob, BM 1333, VABM 1217-ssos-ssoo Hypsographic names Man Island, Burton Point, H E A D M O U N TA I N Hydrographic names Head Harbor, Wood River, NIAGARA RIVER Thi� small map iv iutE�ndecl to g-ive a�eneral pic�ture� of the are�a� covered by published topographic mapa of the U. �. (xf�ologic;al Sur�-ey and other �overnznent agerieie�. S��>zne ac�ditional areae have been eovered by old reeon- nai�san��e �urvey � whi�h are no�% conr�idered inadequate. Large�r size �tatue maps of tlie United Statee co�ering topographic mapping, aerial photography, aerial znosaice, vertical cantrol, and horizontal control may be obta,ined on application to the i?. S. (�eological Survey, Wayhing-ton 25, D. C7; �tate indeg circula.rc� �howing the details ot m�,� coverage and the namea of map aheet� priutE°d for di�tribution, are �,lso available without charge. LAND FORbiS �S SF30`'� N ON A TO�'OC'xItAPF3I(, b1AP Thir illuetration �ho«-s the inanner in which reliE�f, hy drographic, and cultural featurer� are eh�>wn on a topographic lriap. The upper part of the illustr��,tion is a pE�rSpecti�-e view of a river vallE�y that li�c� b�tween two hill�. In the foreground i� the �ea, with a bay partly enclo9ed by a hooked sandbar. On each c�ide of the valle�y are terraces through which �treams ha�-e cut g-ullie�. The hill on the right hae a gradual qlope R-it�h rounclecl forme while t�i�.t oi�i the left ri�eg abruptly ancl ends izi a�harp pre�ipic�e from whieh it �lope� gradually- a�-ay- fc�rming an inclined tableland that is tra� ereed by- a fE;w shallow gullies. The lo�-er part of the illuetration r�hoa�s the same ground fori7is repreeented by coxitour line�. The c�ontour interval u�ed hc�re is 20 f�et, which meany th�,t the verti- cal dista,xice k�etween one contour and the xlext i:� 2u fee�t. ��F:Iii�L YII()T()(xIZAPEI TT�FD IN T��F YRF.�'ARATI()1V UF MAP SHOWN BELOW. Yortion of U. S. C=eological Survey's Delano, Ya. 7.5' quadrangle. Sc,ale 1:24,000 (1"=2000'). Contour interval 20 feet. Topographs� from aerial pliotograph� by multipleg methode. Surveyed in 1946. �"�1 0 _ �i /; i4, ` .� , � �.�: �� �����--�- ��' �"T�:� ��� Yortion of U. S. Geologica,l Survey's D1ah�noy, Pa.15' quadrangle. ��� � k,sP,�s��,�,� , �._ee �"gA �cale 1:fi2,500 (1"=approgimately 1 milE�). Contour interva,l 20 feet. ° _ ' '� � �� '- ; � � 1 ; � SurvE�yed in 1889. �4�€EP� � - � rl ND. � � ``��'` � N�tf3aane�'�: - �; �st �i,'�a��andsckhinetion�� ��' o" The> maps �hown abo�-e co�er the saine g7�ound area. A comparison of the two will �how the egten�ive changes that liave been made since thf� mapping of the Mahanoy quadrangle in 1889. They alro illuatrate the value of large scale mapping� w here culture i5 den�e or where greater detail i:� needecl. Older maps, �uch av tYie �inall one shown above, will be rE;placed a�ith modern inap� as funds becorne availablE�. ��',ivc�i 1�1��}iz� Ttil�i,��z' �yF� � � _.i' �£� .�, ` � � '� r �. .�-f. _ - . � . - _. � } �, - . ; _ � �,� ._ _ z a � �w��.},,.x, � ��� .� ��.� _ � � . �'�}�' S ,�,',i�"r. � l! � , ,.'� � .. . PI.�NI+', '1`�'�I3LF �I [TL'1'lYLl�.'1 Surves- iziarker and soine of thf� in�trurne�nty used iu the prepara�tion of a topogr•aphic map WATER-SUPPLY PAPERS--Cor�tinued. 680. Droughts of 193U-34, by J. C. Hoyt. 106 pp. 20c. 8Z0, Drought of 1936, with discussion on the significance of drought ;n relation to climate, by J. C. Hoyt. 6Zpp. 15c. �837. Inventory of unpublished hydrologic data, by W. T. Holland and C. S. Jarvis. 19?8. 77 pp, 99Z. Bibliography and index of publications relating to ground water prepared by the Geological Survey and cooperating agencies, by G. A. Waring and O. E. Meinzer. 1947. 412 pp. $1. '(Supersedes Water-Supply Paper 4Z7. ) 995. Index to river surveys made by the United States Geological Survey and other agencies revi.sed to July 1, 1947, by B. F. Jones and R. O. Helland. 145 pp. 75c. (Supersedes Water-Supply Paper 558. ) 1022. Quality of surface waters of the United States, 1944. i947. 311 �p. 55c. 1030. Quality of surface waters of the United States, 1945�. 1949. 335 pp. 60c. The following waier-supply papers give information on water levels and artesian pres- sure: ?77 (30c), 817 (75c), 840 ($1), 845 (75c), 886 ($1), 909 (Z5c), 939 (30c), 947 (30c), 989 (35c), 1019 (40c), 1026 (45c), 1G74 (75c), an3 1099 (45c). Stream measurements in the years mentiohed: Year 1899 1902 1903 '.904 1905 1906 1907-i3 1912 1913 1914 1915 1916 1917 1918 W ater -Supply Paper Price Year �37 84 99 131 � 173 209 �247 327 35? 387 �407 437 �457 477 $0. 10 . 25 . 15 . 15 . 10 . 10 .05 . 10 . 05 1919-ZO 1924 19Z5 1926 1927 19Z8 19z9 1930 1931 1932 1933 1934 1935 1936 Water-5upply I Water-Supply Paper Price Year Paper Price 507 587 607 �27 647 667 687 702 717 732, 749 76Z 787 807 $0. 10 .20 .20 . 15 .20 . 15 . 15 .20 . 10 . 10 . 10 .20 .20 .25 LIBRARiES 1937 1938 1939 1940 1941 194z 1943 1944 1945 1946 1947 1948 827 857 877 897 9Z7 957 977 1007 1037 1057 1087 1117 $0. 25 .25 .45 .50 .40 .40 . 55 . 60 . 75 1. 00 1. 00 1. 00 Many of the publicatioiis listed above may be consulted in the following iibraries in Oklahoma: ADA: East Central State Teachers College. AL V A: Northwestern State Teachers Coliege. BA"tZ TLESVILLE: U. S. Bureau of Mines• DURANT: Southeastern Teachers College . EDI�SOND: Central State Teachers College. ENID: C arnegie. LANGSTON: University NORMAN: University of Oklahoma. Oklahoma Geological Survey. OKLAHOMA CITY: Oklahoma State. SHAWNEE: Oklahoma Baptist University. STILLWATER: Oklahoma Agricultural and Mechanical Cellege. TAHLEQUAH: Northeastern State Teachers Gollege. TULSA: University of Tulsa. WILBURTON: O'_clahoma School of Mines and r4etallurgy. -5- Interior-Duplicating Section, Washington, U. C. 0�797 UNITEU STATE9 DEPART�I��T OF THE INTERIqR (3EOLOUICAL SIIItVEY W GEOLOGIC AND WATER-SUPPLY REPORTS ON � TENNESSEE [To accumpanS t��i�kraPhlc. lndez mePl Januesy 1962 � The following reports relate to the geology, and to the mineral and water resources of Tennessee. An asterisk (*) indicates that the report is out of print, but many such reports are available for consultation in certain libraries. (See list on p. 6) The publications for which the price is stated are sold by the Superintendent of Documents, Government Printing Office, Washington 25, �. C. Remittance to that official should be made by postal money order, express order, or check; postage stamps will not be accepted. If additional references to geologic information on this area are required they may be obtained from "Bibliography of North American ge- ology," published as Bulletins 746, 747, 823, 937, 938, 949, 952, 958, 968, and 977. ANNUAL REPORTS: *Fourth, 1882-83. Contains: A review of the fossil Ostreidae of North America; and a comparison of the fossil with the living forms, by C. A. White, pp. 273-430. *Eighth, 1886-87. Part II contains: The geographical distribution of fossil plants, by L. F. Ward, pp. 663-960. *Tenth, 1888-89. Part I contains: Fauna of the Lower Cambrian or Olenellus zone, by C. D. Walcott, pp. 509-763. *Twelfth, 1890-91. Part I contains: The Lafayette formation, by W d McGee, pp. 347-521; The North American continent during Cambrian time, by C. D. Walcott, pp. 523-568. *Thirteenth, 1891-92. Part II contains: The mechanics of Appalachian structure, by Bailey Willis, pp. 211-281; The average elevation of the United States, by Henry Gannett, pp. 283-289. *Fourteenth, 1892-93. Part II contains: Potable waters of eastern United States, by W 7 McGee, pp. 1-47; Natural mineral waters of the United States, by A. C. Pea1e, pp. 49-88. *Fifteenth, 1893-94. Contains: Preliminary report on the geology of the common roads of the United States, by N. S. Shaler, pp. 259-306; The Potomac formation, by L. F. Ward, pp. 307-397. *Sixteenth, 1894-95. Part I contains: Principles of North American pre-Cambrian geology, by C. R. Van I3ise, with an appendix on flow and fracture of rocks as related to structure, by L. M. Hoskins, pp. 571-b74; Surnmary of the primary triangulation executed by the United States Ceological 3urvey between the years 1882 and 1894, by Henry Gannett, chief topographer, pp. 875-885. *Seventeenth, 1895-96, Part I contains: Magnetic declination in the United States, by Henry Gannett, pp. 203-440. Part II coritains: The Tennessee phosphates, by C. W. Hayes, pp. 513-550. *Eighteenth, 1896-97. Part I contains: Triangulation and spirit 1evelir_g, by H. M. Wilson, sT._.H. Renshawe, E. M. Douglas, and R. U. Goode, pp. 131-422. Part IV contains: R,eport of progress of. stream measure- ments for the calendar year 1896, by A. P. Davis, pp. 1-418. *Nineteenth, 1897-98. Part I contains: Triangulation and spirit leveling, by H. M. Wilson,7 J. H. Renshawe, E. M. Douglas, and R. U. Goode, pp. 145-408. Part II contains: Physiography of the Chattanooga district, in Tennessee, Georgia, and Alabama, by C. W. Hayes, pp. 1-58. Part IV contains: Report of progress of stream measurements for the calendar year 1897, by F. H. Newe11, including papers by Dwight Porter, J. B. Lippincott, and others, pp. 1-Ei32. *Twentieth, 1898-99. Part I contains: Triangulation and spirit leveling, by H. M. Wilson, 7. H. Renshawe, E. M. Douglas, and R. U. Goode, pp. 211-530. Part IV contains: Report of progress of stream measurements for the calendar year 1898, by F. H. Newell, pp. 1-562. *Twenty-first, 1899-1900. Part III contains: Tennessee white phosphate, by C. W. Hayes, pp. 473-485. Part N contains: Report of progress of stream measurements for the calendar year 1899, by F. H. Newell, pp. 9-488. *Twenty-second, 1900-1901. Part III contains: The coal fields of the United States, by C. W. Hayes, pp. 7-24; The southern Appalachian coal field, by C. W. Hayes, pp. 227-263. Part IV contains: Report of progress of stream measurements for the calendar year 1900, by F. H. Newell, pp. 9-506. MONOGRAPH: *51. Cambrian Brachiopoda, bp C. D. Walcott. 1912. In two parts. Part I, 872 pp. ; Part II, 363 pp. GEOLOGIC FOLIOS: *2. Ringgold, Ga. -Tenn. , by C. W. Hayes. 1894. 5 pp. , 4 maps. *4. Kingston, Tenn. , by C. W. Hayes. 1894. 5 pp. , 4 maps. *6. Chattanooga, Tenn. , by C. W. Hayes. 1894, 5 pp. , 4 maps. *8. Sewanee, Tenn. , by C. W. Hayes. 1894. 5 pp. , 4 maps. GEOLOGIC FOLIOS-Continued. *12� Estillville, Ky.-Va.-Tenn., by M. R. Campbell. 1894. 7 pp., 4 maps. *16. Knox�ille, Tenn., -N. C., by Ar:hur Keith. 1895. 6 pp,, 4 maps. *20. Cleveland, Tenn. , by C. W. Hayes.. 1895. 5 pp. , 4 maps. *21. Pikeville, Tenn. , by C. W. Hayes. 1895. 5 pp. , 4 maps. *22. McMinnville, Tenn. , by C. W. Hayes. 1895. 3 pp. , 4 maps. *25. Loudon, Tenn. , by Arthur Keith. 1896, 7 pp. , 4 maps. *27. Morristown, `I'enn. , by Arthur Keith. 1896. 7 pp. , 4 maps. *33. Briceville, Tenn. , by Arthur Keith. 1896. 5 pp. , 4 maps. *40: Wartburg, Tenn. , by Arthur Keith. 1897. 4 pp. , 4 maps. *53. Standingstone, Tenn., by M. R. Campbell. 1895, ti pp., � maps. *59. Bristol, Va. -Tenn. , by M. R. Campbell. 1895. 12 pp. , 4 maps. * 75. Maynardville, Tenn, , by Arthur Keith. 1801. 6 pp. , 4 maps. *90. Cranberry, N. C. -Tenn. , by Arthur Keith. 1903. 9 pp. , 4 maps. *95. Columbia, Tenn. , by C. W. Hayes and E. O. Ulrich. 1903. 6 pp. , 5 sheets of illustrations and tables, 4 maps. *116. Asheville, N. C.-Tenn., by Arthur Keith. 1904.. 10 pp., 4 maps. *118. Greeneville, Tenn.-N. C., byArthur Keith. 1905. 8 pp,, 3 maps. *124. Mount Mitchell, N. C.-Tenn., by Arthur Keith.. 1905. 1Q pp., 4 rr,aps. *143. Nantahala, N. C.-Tenn., by Arthur Keith. 1907. 12 pp., 4 maps. *151. Roan Mountain, Tenn. -N. C. , by Arthur Keith. 1907. 12 pp. , 2 sheets of illustrations, 4 maps. *187. Ellijay, Ga. -N. C. -Tenn. , by Laurence LaForge and W. C. Phalen. 1913, 12 pp., 4 rnaps. PROFESSIONAL PAPERS: *11. The clays of the United States east of the Mississippi River, oy Heinrich �t,ies. 1903. 298 pp. *37. The southern Appalachiar. forests, by H. B. A;�res and W. W. Ashe. 1905, 291 pp. *72. Denudation and erosion in the southern Appalachian region and the Monongahela basin, by L. C. Glenn. 1911. 137 pp. *81, Cretaceous deposits of the eastern Gulf region and Species of Exogyra from the eastern Gulf regian and the Carolinas, by L. �i. Stephenson. 1914. 77 pp. . *90. Shorter contributions to general geology, 1914. Contains: The Cretaceous-Eocene contact in the Atlantic and Gulf Coastal Plain, by L. W. Stephenson, pp. 155-182. *91. The lower Eocene floras of southeastern North America, by E. W. Berry. 1916. 481 pp. 92. The middle and upper Eocene floras of southeastern North America, by E. W. Berry. 1924. 206 pp, • $1. *95. Shorter contributions to general geology, 1915. Contains: Erosion intervals in the Eocene of the Mississippi embayment, by E. W. Berry, pp. 73-82. *100. The coal fields of the United States, by M. R. Campbell and J. A. Bownocker. 1929. Contains: General introduction, by M. R. Campbell, pp. 1-33. *112. Upper Cretaceous floras of the eastern Gulf region in Tennessee, Mississippi, Alabama, and Georgia, by E. W. Berry, 1919. 177 pp. *131, Shorter contributions to economic geology, 1922. Contains: Additions to the flora of the Wilcox group, by E. W. Berry, pp. 1-21, *135. The composition of the river and lake waters of the United States, by F. W. Clarke. 1924. 199 pp. 136. The flora of the Ripley formation, by E. W. Berry. 1925. 94 pp. 50c. 137. The fauna of the Ripley formation on Coon Creek, Tenn., by Bruce Wade. 1926. 272 pp, $i. *139. Geology and ore deposits of the Ducktown mining district, Tenn., by W. H. Emmons and F. B. Laney, with the active collaboration of Arthur Keith. 1926, 114 pp, 156. Revision of the lower Eocene Wilcox flora of the Southeastern States, with descriptions of new species, chiefly from Tennessee and Kentucky, by E. W. Berry. 1930. 196 pp. 75c. 179. Origin of the copper deposits of the Ducktown type in the southern Appalachian region, by C. S. Ross. 1935. 165 pp. 45c. BULLETINS: *32. Lists and analyses of the mineral springs of the United States (a preliminary study), by A. C. Pea1e. ' 1886. 235 pp, • *52. Subaerial decay of rocks and origin of the red color of certain formations, by I. C. Russell. 1889. 65 pp. *80. Correlation papers: Devonian and Carboniferous, by H. S. Williams. 1891. 279 pp. *81. Correlation papers: Cambrian, by C. D. Walcott. 1891. 447 pp. *82. Correlation papers: Cretaceous, by C. A. White. 1891. 273 pp. *83. Correlation papers: Eocene, by W. B. Clark. 1891. 173 pp. *84. Correlation papers: Neocene, by W. H. Dall and G. D. Harris. 1892. 349 pp. *86. Correlation papers: Archean and Algonkian, by C. R. Van Hise. 1892. 549 pp. *87. A synopsis of American fossil Brachiopoda, including bibliography and synonymy, by Charles Schuchert. 1897. 464 pp. *173. A synopsis of American fossil Bryozoa, including bibliography and synonymy, by J. M. Nickles and R. S. Bassler. 1900. 663 pp. BUI�LFTINS--Continued. ��213. Contributions to economic geology, 1902. Contains: Copper deposits of the,Appalachian States, by W. H. Weed, pp. 181-185; Iron-ore deposit� of the Cranberry dist•rict, N. C.-Tenn., ���??rttiur Keith, pp. 243-246; Coal fields of the United States, by C. W. Iiayes, pp, 257-269; Tennessee marbles, by Arthur Keith, pp. 356-370; Stoneware and brick clays of western Tennessee and northwestern Mississippi, by E. C. Eckel, pp. 382-391; Oriqin and extent of the Tennessee white phosphates, by C. W. Hayes, pp. 418-423; The white phosphates of Decatur County, Tenn., by E. C. Eckel, pp. 424-425. *225. Contributions�to economic geology. 1903. Contains: Recent zinc mining in east Tennessee, by Arthur Keith, pp. 208-213; The Cumberland Gap coal fields of Kentucky and Tennessee, by G. H, Ashley, pp. 259-275. *258. The origin of certain place names in the United States (second edition), by Henry Gannett. 1905. 334 pp. *260. Contributions to economic geology, 1904. Contains: The production of gold in United States in 1904, by Waldemar Lindgren, p. 32-38; The copper deposits of eastern United States, by W. H. Weed, pp. 217-220; Lead and zinc resources of the United States, by H. F. Bain, pp. 251-273. *264. Record of deep-well drillinq for 1904, by M. L. Fuller, E. r. Lines, and A. C. Veatch. 1905. 106 pp. *285. Contributions to economic geology, 1905. Contains: The copper rnines of the United States in 1905, by W. H. Weed, pp. 93-124; Cement resources of the Cumberland Gap district, Tenn.-Va., by E. C. Eckel, pp. 374-376; Clays of western Kentucky and Tennessee, by A. F. Crider pp. 417- 427. *298. Record of deep-we11 drilling for 1905, by M. L. Fuller and Sarnuel Sanford. 1906. 299 pp. *315, Contributions to economic geology, 1906, Part I. Contains: Southern red hematite as an ingredient of inetallic paint, by E. F. Burchard, pp. 330-334. *323. Experimental work conducted in the chemical labratory of the United States fuel-testing piant at St. Louis, Mo. , January 1, 1905, to July 31, 1906, by N. W. I.ord. 49 pp. *325, A study of four hundred steaming tests, made at the fuel-testing p1ant, St. Louis, Mo., in 1904, 1905, and 1906, by L. P. Breckenridge. 196 pp. *332. Report of the United States fuel-testing plant at St. Louis, Mo., ,lanuary 1, 1906, to June 3U, 1907. 299 pp. *336. Washinq and coking tests of coal and cupola tests of coke, conducted by° the United States fuel-testing plant at 5t. Louis, Mo. , January 1, 1905, to June 30, 1907, by Richard Moldeilke, A. W. Belden, and G. R. Delamater, with introduction by T. A. Holmes. 76 pp. *373. The smokeless combustion of coal in boiler plants, with a chapter ori central heating plants, by D. T. Randall and �I. W. Weeks. 1909. 188 pp. 378. Results of purchasing coal under government specifications, by J. S. Burrows, with a paper on burning the small sizes of anthracite for heat and power purposes, by D. T. Randall. 1909. 44 pp. i0c. *380, Contributions to economic geology, 1908, Part I. Contains: Tonnage estimates of Clinton iron ore in the Chattanooqa region of Tennessee, Georgia, and Alabama, by E. F. Burcha��d, pp. 169-187. *394. Papers on the conservation of mineral resources (reprinted from� report of the National Conservation Commission, February 190�). Contains: Coal fields of the United States, by M. R. Campbell and E, W. Parker, pp. 7-26; The petroleum resources of the United States, by D. T. Day, pp. 30-50; Iron ores of the United States, by C. W. Hayes, pp. 70-113; Resources of the United States in gold, silver, coppex•, 1ead, and zinc, by Waldemar I�indgren, pp. 114-I56; The ohosphate deposits of the United States, by F. B. Van Horn, pp. 157-171. *416. Recent development of the groducer-gas power plant in the United States, b,y R. H. Fernald. 1909. 82 pp. *426. Granites of the southeastern Atlantic States, by T. L. Watson. 1910. 282 pp. *427. Manqanese deposits of the United States, with sections on foreign deposits, cherriistry, and uses, by E. C. Harder. 1910. 298 pp. *441. Results of spirit leveling in Alabama, Georgia, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Tennessee, 1896 to 1909, inclusive. 145.pp. *455. Copper deposits of the Appalachian States, by W. H. Weed. 1911. 166 pp. *465. The State geological surveys of the United States, compiled under the direction of C. W. Hayes. 1911. 117 pp. *470. Contributions to economic geology, 1910, Part I. Contains: Preliminary report on the mineral deposits of Ducktown, Tenn., by W. H. Emmons and F. B. Laney, pp. 151-172. *471. Contributions to econornic geology, 1910, Part II. Contains: Miscellaneous analyses of coal samples from various fields of the United States, pp. 629-655. *494. The New Madrid earthquake, by M. L. Fu11er. 1912. 119 pp. *519. Results of spirit leveling in Tennessee, 1910 and 1911. 45 pp. *522. Portland cement materials and industry in the United States, by E. C. Eckel, with contributions by E. F. Burchard and others. 1913. 401 pp. *523. Nitrate deposits, by H. S. Ga1e. 1912. 36 pp. *540. Contributions to economic geology, 1912, Part I. Contains: Preliminary report on the red iron ores of east Tennessee, northeast Alabama, and northwest Georgia, by E., F. Burchard, pp. 279-328. BULLETINS--C ontinued. *586. Slate i.n the United States, by T. N. Da.le and others. 1914. 220 pp, *599. Our mineral resources - hova tc make Arnerica industrially �ndependent, by G. O. Smith. 1914. 48 pp. *610. Mineralogic notes, series 3, by W. T. Schaller: 1916. Contains: Crystals of pisanite from Ducktown, Tenn., p. 161. *621. Contributions to economic geology, 1915, Part II. Contains: Analyses of coal samples from various parts of the United States, by M. R. Carnpbell and F. R. Clark, pp. 251-375. *624. Usefulrninerals ofthe United States, by F. C. Schrader, R. W. Stone, and Sarnuel Sar.dford. 1916. 412 pp. *625. The enrichment of ore deposits, by W. H. Emmons. 1917. 530 pp, *641. Contributions to economic geology, 1916, Part II. Contains: (k) Coals in the area between E�on Air and Clifty, Tenn., by Charles Butts, pp. 307-310, 5c.; *(1) Oil resources of black shales of the eastern United States, by G. H. Ashley, pp. 311-333. *659. Cannel coal in the United States, by G. H. Ashley. 1918. 127 pp. *660. Contributions to econorr,ic geology, 1917, Par� I. Contains: Notes on the greensand deposits of the eastern United States, by G. H. Ashley, pp. 27-49; Methods of analysis of greensand, by W. B. Hicks and R. K. Bailey, pp. 51-58. *666. Our mineral supplies. 1919. 278 pp. *(j) Phosphate rock, by R. W. Stone, 4 pp. ;*(o) Bauxite and aluminum, by J. M. Hill, 4 pp. ;*(r) Limestone and lime, by G. F. Loughlin, 6 pp. ;*(s} port- land cement, by E. F. Burchard, 5 pp. ;*(t) Clay, by Jefferson Middleton, 3 pp. ;(v) Iron, by E. F. Burchard, 12 pp. , 5c. ;*(w) Barium and strontium, by J. M. Hill, 3 pp. ;*(cc) Fluorspar, by E. F. Burchard, 8 pp. ;*(dd) Petroleum, by J. D. Northrop, 13 pp. ;*(ee) Manganiferous iron ores, by E. C. Harder, 13 pp. *701. Geothermal data of the United States, including many original determinations of underground terr- perature, by N. H. Darton.• 1920. 97 pp. *708. Hiyh-grade clays ofthe eastern United States, with notes on some western clays, by Heinrich Ries, W. S. Bayley, and others. 1922. 314 pp. *735. Contr�butions to economic geology, 1922, Part I. Contains: General features of the magnetite ores of western North Carolina and eastern Tennessee, by W. S. Bayley, pp. 209-270. *737. Manganese aeposits of east Tennessee, by G. W. Stose and r. C. �chrader. 1923. 154 pp. *795. Contributions to economic geology, 1927, Part I. (d) The brown iron ores of west-middleTennessee, by E. F. Burchard, pp. 53-112, 15c. *83£3. Nitrate deposits of the United States, by G. R. Mansfield and Leona Boardman. 1932. 107 pp. 896. Lexiccn of geologic names of the United States, by M. G. Wilmarth. 1938. Part 1, A- L, pp. 1-1244; part 2, M-Z, pp. 1245-2396. $5.25 for the set. 901. Clay investigations in the Southern States, 1934-35, reports by W. B. Lang and others. 34� pp. $1. 928-D. Manganiferous and ferruginous chert in Perry and Lewis Counties, Tenn. , by E. F. Burchard, with a statement on concentration tests from Perry County, by H. S. Rankin. 1943, pp. 223-273. 25c. 940-J. Cobalt-bearing manganese deposits of Alabama, Georgia, and Tennessee, by W. G. Pierce. 1944, pp. 265-285. 20c. Information on altitudes in the United States is ccntained in Bulletins *5, *76, *160, and *274. Information on boundaries and areas ofthe United States, the several states and territories with historical outlines of boundary changes is contained in Bulletins *13, *171, *226, *302, *689, and *817. Inforrr.ation on results of primary triangulation and primar;� traverse is contained in Bulletins *122, *216, *276, *310, *440; *496, *551, *644-?I, and *709-H. Analyses of rocYs and minerals from the laboratory of the United States Geological Survey are given in Bulletins *9, *60, *64, *78, *113, *148, *167, *16�i, *G20, *228, and *878. WATER-SUPPLY PAPERS: *44, Profiles of rivers in the Uniterj �States, by Henry Gannett. 1901, 100 pp. *62. Hydrography of the southern Appalachian Mountain region, Part I, by H. A. Pressey. 1902. 95 pp. *63. Hydrography of the southern Appalachian Mountain region, Part II, by H. A. Pressey. 1902. 95 pp. *102, Contributions to the hydrology of eastern United States, �1903. Contair.s: Notes on the wells, springs, and general water resources of certain eastern and central States-Tennessee, by L. C. G1enn, pp. 358-367. *114. Underqround waters of eastern LTnited States. 1905. Contains: Tennessee and Kentucky, by L. C. Glenn, pp. 198-208. *115. River surveys and profiles made during 1903, by W. C. Hall and J. C. Hoyt. 115 pp. *147. Destructive floods in the United States in 1904, by E. C. Murphy and others.. Contains: Drpuqht in Ohio River drainage basin, by E. C. 1�4urphy, pp. 173-182. *149. Preliminary list of deep borings in the United States (second edition), by N. H. Darton. 1905. 175 pp. *152. A review of the laws,forbidding pollution of inlar_d waters in the Ur.ited States (second edition), by E. B. Goodell. 1905. 149 pp. *162. Destructive floods in the United States in 1905, with a discussion of flood discharge and frequPncy and an index to flood literature, by E. C. Murphy and oihers. Contains: r lood di �charge and frequency ir.the United States, pp. 55-87. *164. Underground waters of Tennessee and Kentucky west of Tennessee River and of ar. adjacent area in Illinois, by L. C. Glenn. 1906. 173 pp. VJATER-SUPPLY PAPERS--Continued. *234. Papers on t��e conservation of water resources (reprinted frorn report of the National Conservation Commission, February 1909). Contains: Distrib�3tion of rainfall, by Henry Gannett, DD. %-A: Developed water powers, compiled under the direction of V��, M. Steuart, with discussion by M. O. Leiqhton, pp. 28-45; Undeveloped water powers, by M. O. Leighton, pp. 46-58; Denuda- tion, by R. B. Dole and Herman Stabler, pp. 78-93. *236. The quality of surface waters in the United States, Part I, Analyses of waters east of the one hundredth meridian, by R. B. Dole. 1909. 123 pp. *280. Gaging stations maintained by the United States Geological Survey, 1888-1910, and Survey publications relating to water resources, compiled by B. D. Wood. i912. 102 pp. *334. The �hio Valley flood of March-April 1913, including comparisoms with some earlier floods, by A. H. Horton and H. J. Jackson. 1913. 96 pp. *340. 5tream-gaging stations and publications relating to water resources, 1885-1913, compiled by B. D. Wood. 195 pp. Contains: Part III, Ohio River basin, pp. 31-42. *364._ Water analyses from thelaboratoryof the United States Geological Survey„ tabulated by F. W. Clarke. 1914. 40 pp. 489. The occurrence of ground water in the United 5tates, with a discussion of Iprinciples, by O. E. Meinzer. 1923. 321 pp. $2.25. *496. The industrial utility of public water supplies in the United States, by W. D. Collins. 1923. 59 pp. *520. Contributions to the hydrology of the United States, 1923-24. Contains: Temperature of water available for industrial use in the United States, by W. F. Collins, pp. 97-104. *559. Relations between quality of water and industrial development in the United States, by W. D. Collins. 1926. 43 pp. *560, Contributions to the hydroloqy of the United States, 1925. Contains: Index of analyses of natural waters in the United States, by 4�%, D. Collins and C. S. Howard, pp. 5.8-85. *579. Power capacity and production in the United States, by C. R. Daugherty, A. H. Horton, and R. W. Davenport. 1928. 210 pp. *638. Contributions to the hydrology of the United States, 1931. Contains: A preliminary report on the artesian water supply of Memphis, Tenn., by F. G. Wells, pp. 1-34. *640, Ground water in north-central Tennessee, by A. M. Piper. 1932. 238 pp. *659. Contributions to the hycYrology of the United States, 1932. Contains: Index of analyses of natural waters in the United States, 1926-1931, by W. D. Co�lins and C. S. Howard, pp. 191-206. *677. Ground water in south-central Tennessee� by C. V. Th,eis. 1936. 182 pp. *771. Floods in the United States, magnitude and frequency, by C. S. Jarvis and others. 1936. 497 pp. 772. 5tudies of relations of rainfall and run-off in the United States, by W. G. I�oyt and other. s, 1936. 301 pp. 70c. *800. The floods of March 1936, part 3,Potomac, James, and upper Ohio Rivers, by N. C. Grover, chief hydraulic engineer. 1938. 351 pp. *820. Drought of 1936, with discussion on the significan�e of drought in relation to climate, by d. C. Hoyt. 992. Bibliography ar�d index of publications relating to yrqund water prepared by the Geological Survey and cooperating�agencies, by G. A. V�,'aring and O. E. Meinzer. 1947. 412 pp. $1. 995. Index to river surveys made by the United States Geological Survey and other agencies revised to 7uly 1, 1947, by B. E. Jcnes and R. O. He11and. 1948. 145 pp. 75c. (Supersedes Water-Supply Paper 558.) 1066, Floods of August 19�G in the Southeastern States. �949. 554 pp. $2.75. The foilowing water-sup� y papers give informatior_ or. water levels and artesian pressure: *817, *840, *845, *886, 907 (20c), 937 (2fDc), 945 (25c), 987 (35cj, 1017 (70c), 1024 (50c), 1072 (75c), 1u97 (60c), and 1127 (55c). Stream measurements in th¢ years mentioned: Year 1896 1897 1898 1899 1900 190� Y902 1903 1904 1905 1906 1907-8 1909 1910 Wate - Supp�y Price Pa� er �11 *15 *27 *36 *48 *49 *65 *75 *83 *98 *128 *169 *205 *243 *263 *28� Year 1911 1912 i913 1914 1915 1916 1917 1918 1919-20 1921 1822 1923 1924 1925 1926 1927 Water- Supply Paper *303 *323 *353 *383 *403 *433 *453 *473 *503 *523 *543 563 *583 *603 *623 *643 Price $0. 25 Year 1928 1929 1930 1931 1932 1933 1934 1935 1936 Water- Supply Paper *663 *683 *698 *702 *713 *717 *728 *732 *743 *747 *758 *762 *783 *787 *803 *807 Price Stream rneasurements in �he years me.itioned (continued): �Uate c- Water- Water- Year Suppiy Price � Year Supply Price Year Suppiy Price Paper Paper Paper 1937 *823 1941 923 $0.75 1945 1033 $1.50 *829 927 .40 1037 .75 1938 *�53 1942 953 1.00 1946 1053 1.75 *85R 957 .40 1057 1.00 1�339 *873 1943 973 1.25 1947 1083 1.75 *877 977 .55 1087 1.00 „ 1940 *893 1944 1003 1.50 1948 1113 1.75 *897 1007 .60 '1117 1.00 LIBRARIES. --Many of the publications listed above may be consulted in. the following libraries ir. Ter.nessee. Chattanooya: Memphis: Nashville-Cor.tinued. Public. Cossitt. Tennessee State. Clarksville: Murfreesboro: Var_derbilt Uriversity. Austin Peay State College. State Teachers College. Joint University Johnson City: Nashville: Libraries. East Tennessee State College. Carnegie. Sewanee: (Bulletins on1y. j State Geological Survey. University of the Scuth. Knoxville: [Jniversity of Tennessee. 0 INT.-7UP. SE�., IIASH.. D.C1Y9l6 � P 4 CODE OF FEDERAL REGULATIONS TITLE 30---MINERAL RESOURCES CHAPTER II GEOLOGICAL SUBVEY PAftT 221 OIL AND GAS OPERATING REGULATIONS UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Harold L. Ickes, Secretary GEOLOGICAL SURVEY W. C. Mendenhall, Director CODE OF FEDE�tAL REGULATIONS TITLE 30---MI1vERAL RESOURCES CHAPTER II GEOLOGICAL SURVEY PAR,T 221 OIL AND GAS OPERATIl`�TG 1�,EGULATIONS Applicable to Lands of the United �tates and all Restricted Tribal and 1�llotted Indian Lands (Except Osage Indian Re�ervation) 7 F. R. 4132 - 4141 UNI�ED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE IleTTERIO�t Harold L. Ickes, Secretary GEOLOGICAL SURVEY W. C. Mendenhall, Direcior CHAPTER II--GEOLOGICAL SURVEY DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PART 221--OIL AND GAS OFERATING REGULATIONS Sec. 281.1 INTRODUCTION ......................................................... 221.2 DEFINITIONS .......................................................... (a) Secretary .................................................... (b) Director ..................................................... (c) Supervisor ................................................... (d) Officer in char�e ............................................ (e) Superintendent ..................... . ....................... (f) Lease ........................................................ (g) Leased lands, leasehold ...................................... (hJ Producing lease .............................................. (i) Lessor ....................................................... �J) Lessee ......................................................� (k) Register ..................................................... (1) Operator ..................................................... (m) Designated operator or agent ................................. (n) Waste of oil or gas .......................................... (o) Ga� ........... ............................................... �P) Oil, crude oil ............................................... 221.3 221. 4 221. 5 221. 6 22.1. 7 221. 8 221. 9 221. 10 221.11 2u1. 12 221. 13 221. i� 221. 15 221. 16 221. 17 221. 18 221. 19 221. 20 221. 21 221. 22 221. 23 221. 24 221. 25 221. 26 221. 27 221. 28 JURISDICTION AND FfINCTIONS OF SUPERVISOR NRISDICTION .......... ............................................ GIIJERAL FUNCTIONS .................................................... SUPERVISION OF OPERATIONS ............................................ REPORTSA�V'D RECON�„'rENDATIONS .......................................... REPORTS t�ND NOTICES .................................................. R.E;lUIRID SAiv�'LFS, TESTS, AND SURVEYS ................................. DAMAGE TO b?INERAL DEPOSITS, DIRECTIOIvAL DRILLING, I�EASE OBLIGATIONS, Vt�LL Ai3AI�T�OIV�°ENT .................................................. WELL POT�?v'PIALS AND F'ER!�".ISSIBLE rLOVP ................................. WELIrSPACINC's AA]D W:LL-CASING� TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE TO LESSEES ........ PRODIICTIQ"I RECORDS; RENTALS, ROYALTIES, AND PAI't��ITS; DRr1INAGE ANl) WASTE............................................................. DI4I5ION ORDII�S, RUN TICi�TS, SALES AGRF,L�+.vIE�NTS OR CONTRACTS .......... SUSFENSION OF OPERATIONS AND PRODUCTION .............................. BEGINNING OR RESIIh'�TIOPd OF DRILLING OR PRODUCING OFERATIONS .......... FNFORCF�vIENT .......................................................... APPEALS ACTION ....................................................... REQUIRF�1!�NTS FOR ALL LESSEES (INCLLIDING I]ESIGNATED OPERATORS) LEASE TERUiIS, REGIJLATIONS, INSTRUCTIONS OF SUPERVISOR, WASTE, DAI�7AGE, SAFEPY, AND flOND ................................... .. ........ DESIGNATED OFERATOR (OR AGENT) ....................................... WFLL LOCATIOPd RESTRICTIONS ........................................... WFLL-SPACING AND WELIrCASING FROGP,A.T�1, WELL OPERATIONS, REQUIRID OFFSETS, DILIGENCE, COMPENSATION IN LIE[J OF DRILLING .............. WELL DESIGNATIONS, PROPERTY BOUNDARIES, iJ1AREE�ERS FOR ABANDONED WELIS .. WELL RECORDS,AND REPORTS, PLATS AND h!APS, SAMPLES, TESTS, AND SURVEYS. PRECAU'PIONS NECESSARY IN A..REAS WfiF�tE HIGH PRESSURES ARE LIKELY TO E}CIST. CA�LE TOOL DRILLING PRECAUTIONS ............ . ....................... ROTARY TOOL DRILLING PRECAUTIONS ..................................... VERTICAL DRILLING .................................................... WATER SHUT-OFFS, FORI�IATION TESTS ..................................... Page 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 3 3 3 3 3 3 4 4 4 5 5 5 5 5 6 6 6 6 7 7 7 7 7 �ec. 221. 29 '�21. 30 221. 31 221. 32 221. 33 221. 34 221.35 221. 36 221. 37 221. 38 221. 39 221. 40 221. 41 221. 42 PART 221--OIL AND GAS OPERATING REGULATIONS PROTECTION OF UPFFR PRODUCTIVE STRATA ............... OPEN FLOWS AND CONTROL OF "WILD" NTELLS .........................• .��• Er.?ULSICN AIv'D DEfiYDRATION ....................... .....•......... POLLUTION AND SURFACE DAi�4AGE .................. ...................... GAGING AND STORING OIL .............................•................. WELL AAANDONNIE[VT ..................................................... PIASTE FREVENTION, AENEFICIAL USE ..................................... ACCIDENTS AND FIRES .................................................. WORKI�:9ANLIKE OPERATIONS ........................ SALES CON'IRACTS, DIVISION ORDERS ..................................... RELIEF FROr� OPERATING, ROYALTY, AND RENTAL RPQUIREt�'IFNTS .............. ROYALTY AND RENTAL PAYIi4ENTS .......................................... SURFACE ZIC'�fiTS ON IN�DIAN LANDS ....................................... COSTS OR DA.MAGES ..................................................... 2�9EASl�'�NT OF PRODUCTION AND COn'IPOTATION OF ROYALTIES 221..43 MEA.SUREMF[VT OF OIL ........................... (a) Correction for impurities ................................... (b) Temperature correction ................................ ..... (c) Gravity determination ............................... .. .'.. (d) Lease production, pipe-line runs ............................. 221.44 MEASiIRENIENT OF GAS ................................................... 221.45 DETERMINATION OF GASOLINE CONTF�IVT OF NAT[Jf?AL GAS ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, 221.46 QUANTITY BASIS FOR CO^,4PU'PING ROYALTIES ON NATURAL GASOLINE, AUTANE, PROPANE, AND OTHER LIQUID HYDROCARE30N SUBSTANCES IICTRACTID FROi�4GAS. 221.47 VALiTE BASIS FOR COIt4PUTING ROYALTIFS .................................. 221.48 ROYALTY RATES ON OIL, FLAT-RATE LEl�SES ............................... 221. 49 ROYALTY RATES ON OIL, SLID,ING AND STEP-SCALE LEASES (PUF3LIC Ll�TD ONLY) . 221.50 ROYAiTY ON GAS ....................................................... 221.51 ROYALTY ON CASIDTG-F�AD OR NATURAL GASOLINE, BUTANE, YROPANE, OR OTf1ER LIQUID HYDROCARBON SUBSTAAICES EATRACTED F�tOh1 GAS .................. 221.52 ROYALTY ON DRIP GASOLINE OR OTI-?�'R NATiTRAI. COPdDENSATE ................. PROCEDURE IN CASE OF DEFAiJ1.T BY LESSE:E ii Page 8 8 8 8 8 8 9 9 9 9 9 9 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 11 11 11 12 12 12 14 14 14 221.53 SHiJTTINGDOWN OPEItATIOIvS, LEASE CANCELATIONS ......................... 14 221.54 I.19UIDATED DAMAC'�S ................................................... 15 221.55 PAYh�Nr OF DAnnAGFS ................................................... 16 ??1.56 DAtdfAGES TO INDIA_rT PROPERTY ........................................... 16 RFPORTS TO BE �.7ADE BY ALLLESSFES (ITdCLUDING OPERATORS) 221.57 GENERAL REQTTIRE_M.ENTS ................................................. 221.58 SUNDRY NOTICES AND REPORTS ON WELLS (FORI�7 9-331A PUflLIC; FOFtT�^. 9-3318 INDIAN) ........................................................... (a) Notice of intention to drill ................................. (b) Notice of intention to change plans ........... ............. (c) Notice of date for casing and water shut-off test ............ (d) Subsequent report of casing and water shut-off test .......... (e) Notice of intention to redrill, repair, or condition well .... (f) Subsequent report of redrillin�, repairing, or conditioning .. (g) Notice of intention to use explosive or chemicals ......... ... (h) Subsequent report of use of explosive or chemicals ........... (i) PJotice of intention to pull, perforate, or otherwise alter casing .................................................... (j) Subsequent report of pulling, perforating, or otherwise altering casing ........................................... 16 16 16 17 17 17 1� 17 17 18 1�9 lEi iii CHAP'I'ER II--GEOLOGICAL SURVEY _ � CHAPTER II--GEOLOGICAL SURVEY Sec. (k) Notice of intention to abandon well .......................... (1) Subsequent report of abandonment ............................. 221.59 LOG AND HISTORY OF WELL (FORM 9-330) ................................. 221.60 MONTHLY REPORT OF OPERATIONS (FORM 9-329 PUBLIC; FORM 9-329A INDIAN) . 221.61 DAILY REPORT OF GAS-PRODUCING WELLS (FORM 9-352) ..................... 221.62 STATII+�NT OF OIL AND GAS RUN3 AND ROYALTIES (FORM 9-361 PUBLIC; FORM 9-361A INDIAN) .............................................. 221.63 ROYALTY AND RENTAL REMITTANCE (FORM 9-614A INDIAN) ................... 221.64 ROYALTY AND F2IIVTAL REMITTANCE (FORM 11ND NAVAL P�TROLEUM RESERVES) ... 221.65 SFEC2AL FORA,'6 OR REPORTS ............................................. 221.66 AFPEALS ...............................o.... ......................... 221.67 EFFECTIVE DATE OF THESE OIL AND GAS OPERATING REGULATIONS, REPEAL OF PRIOR REGULATIONS .........................................1.... Page 18 18 19 19 20 20 20 20 20 20 21 PART 221--OIL AND GAS OPERATING F2EGULATIONS Section 221.1 INTRooucTloN. These oil and gas operating regulations will govern the development and production of deposits of oil, gas, and casing-head or natural gasoline, including propane, butane, and other hydrocarbons, and fluids, and lands containing such deposits owned or controlled by the United States, and under juris- diction of the Secretary by law or administrative arrangement, These regulations shall be administered under the Director of the Geological Survey, except that as to lands within naval petroleum reserves they shall be administered under such official as the Secretary of the Navy shall designate.* 221.2 DEFINITIONS. The follaving terms as used in these oil and gas operating regulations shall have the meaninge here given: (a) SECRETAkY.--The Secretary of the Interior, except where lands in naval petroleum reserves are involved, and in that case the Secretary of the Navy. (b) DIRecTOR.--The Director of the Geological Survey, Washington, D. C., having administrative direction of the enforcement of these regulations. (c) SUPERVISOR.--A representative of the Secretary, under adminis- trative direction of the Director, authorized and empowered to supervise and direct oil and gas operations and to perform other duties prescribed in these oil and gas operating regulations, or any �subordinate of such representative actir.g under his direction. (d) OFFICER iN CHARGE.--The supervisor or such other officer as the Secretary may designate to supervise technical operations for the develop- ment and production of oil and gas on restricted Indian lands. Over such lands the officer so designated shall exercise the authority and power and perform the duties of supervisor as provided in these regulations. (e� SUPERINTENDENT.--The euperintendent of an Indian agency, or other ofi'icer authorized to act in matters of record, law, and collections with respect to oil or gas leases for restricted Indian lands. (p) LEASE.--An agreement which in consideration of covenants to be observed, grants to a lessee the exclusive right and p:ivilege of develop- ing and producing oil or gas depoeits owned by the lessor subject to these oil and gas operating regulations. *Sections 221.1 to 221.67, inclusive, issued under authority contained in the following statutes: Public Lands; Sec. 32, 41 Stat. 450, sec. 7, 42 Stat. 1450, sec. 6, 46 Stat. 374, 46 Stat. 1523, 47 Stat. 7g8, sec. 40(a), 48 Stat. 977, 49 Stat. 674, 50 Stat. 842; 30 U.S.C., 189, 236, 306, 184, 226, 209, 229a, 30 U.S.C., Sup., 185, 221, 223, 223a, 226, 236a, 221i. Naval Petroleum Reserves: 41 Stat. 813, 45 Stat. 148, 52 Stat. 1252; 34 U.S.C., Sup., 524. Indian Lands: Sec. 3, 26 Stat. 7g5, sec. 2, 35 Stat. 312, 35 Stat. 7g3, sec. 2, 39 Stat. 519, aec, 18, 41 Stat. 426, sec. 6, 41 Stat. 753, 42 Stat. 857, 43 Stat. 111, 43 Stat, 244, 44 Stat. 300, sec. 6, 44 Stat. 659, 46 Stat. 385, 52 Stat. 347, 25 U. S. C. , 397, 396, 356, 400, 401, 398, 400a, 25 U.S.C., Sup., 396a, 2 PART 221--OIL AND GAS OPERATING REGULATIONS (g) LEASED LANDS, LEASEHOLD.--Lands and deposits covered by a lease as defined in paragraph (f), suj�ra. (h) PRODUCING LEASE.--A producirig lease is one including land on which there is a producible well, either active or shut in, or land determined by the supervisor to be subject to subeurface drainage. (i) LESSOR.--The party to a lease who holds title to the leased lande. (j) LESSEE.--The party authorized by a lease, or approved assignment thereof, to develop and produce oil or gas on the leased lands in accord- ance with these oil and gas operating regulations, including all parties holding such authority by or through Y,im. (k) REGISTER.--A representative of the General Land Office in charge of a District Land Office. (1) OPERATOR.--The individual, partnership, firm, or corporation that has control or management of operations on the leased land or a portion thereof. The operator may be a lessee, designated agent of the lessee, or holder of righta under an approved operating agreement. (m) DESIGNATED OPERATOR OR AGENT.--The local representative of the lessee or of the operator; may be the holder of operating rights under an approved operating agreement. �n� WAS7E OF OIL OR GAS.--Waste of oil or gae,, in addition t0 its ordinary meaning, shall mean the physical waste of oil or gas, and waste, loss, or dissipation of reservoir energy existent in any deposit contain- ing oil or gas and necessary or useful in obtaining the maximum recovery from such deposit. 1. Pliysical waste of oil or gas shall be deemed to include the loesor destruction of oil or gas after recovery thereof such as to prevent proper utilization and beneficial use thereof, andethe loss of oil or gas prior to recovery thereof by iso- lation or entrapment, by migration, by premature releaee of natural gas from solution in oil, or in any other manner such as to render impracticable the recovery of such oil or gas. 2. Waste of reservoir energy shall be deemed to include the failure reasonably to maintain such energy by artifieial meane and also the dissipation of gas energy, hydrostatic energy, or other natural reservoir energy, at any time at a rate or in a manner which would constitute improvident use of the energy available or result in loss thereof without reasonably adequate recovery of oil. (o) Gns.--Any fluid, either combustible or noncombustible, which is produced in a natural state from the earth and which maintains a gaseous or rarefied state at ordinary temperature and pressure conditions. (p) 01�, CRUDE oi�.--Any liquid hydrocarbon substance which occurs naturallyin the earth, inciuding drip gasoline or other natural condensates recovered from gas, without resort to manufacturing process.* *For statutory citations, see note to 221.1. CHAPTER II--GEOLOGICAL SURVEY JURISDICTION AND FUNCTIONS OF SUPERVISOR 3 221.3 �URISDICTION. Drilling and producing operations, handling and gaging of. oil and the measurement of gas or other products, determination of royalty liability, receipt and delivery to those entitled thereto of royalty accruing to the lessor and paid in amount of production, determination of amount and manner of payment of dam- ages assessed under authority of these oil and gas operating regulations for defaults or noncompliance with duties by the lessee and, in general, all operations subject to these regulations are under the juriadiction of the supervisor for any district as delineated by the Director. As to producing leases of Indian lands, the officer in charge, and as to lands within naval petroleum reserves, the supervisor shall deter- mine rental liability, record rentals, royalties, and other payments, and maintain lease accounts. Upon request, the supervisor or the Director, will acivise any person concerning these oil and gas operating regulations, and wi1T furnish technical infor- mation and advice relative to oil and gas development and operation on lands subject hereto. * 221.4 GENERAL FUNCTIONS. Th2 supervisor is hereby authorized to require com- pliance with lease terms, with these oil and gas operating regulations, and all other applicable regulations, and with applicable law to the erid that all operations shall coriform to the best practice and shall be conducted in such manner as to protect the deposits of the leased iands and result in the maximum ultimate recovery of oil, gas, or other products with minimum waste. Inasmuch as conditions in one area may vary widely from conditions in another area, these oil and gas operating regulations are general, and detailed procedure hereunder in any p�rticular area is subject to the ju3gment and discretion of the supervisor, and to any areal plan of development that may be adopte3 pursuant to law. The supervisor ma;� require satisfactory evidence that a leaseis in good standing, that the lessee or operator is authorized to conduct operations, and that an acceptable bond has been filed before permitting operatione on the leased land.* 221.5 SUPERVISION oF OPERATIONS, The supervisor shall inspect and supervise - operations under these oil and gas operating regulations; prevent waste, damage to � formations or deposits containing oil, gas, or water or to coal measures or other mineral deposits, and injury to life or property; and shall issue instructions nec- � essary, in his judgment, to accomplish these purposes.* 221.6 REPORTS AND RECOMMENDATIONS. The supervisor shall [R81C8 reports t0 1116 superior administrative officf;r as to the general condition of leased lands, and the manner in which operations are being conducted and departmental orders are being obeyed, and submit frcm time to time information and recommendations for safeguarding and protecting surface property and underlying mineral-bearing formation.* 221.7 REPORTS AND NorlcEs. The supervisor shall prescribe the manner and form in which records of all operations, reports, and notices shall be made by leesees and operators.* 221.8 REQUIRED SAMPLES, TESTS,AND SURVErs. When deemed necessary or advisable, the supervisor is authorized to require that a3equate sarnples be taken and tests or surveys be made in an ac�eptable manner without cost to the lessor to determine the identity and character of formations; the presence or waste of oil, gas, water, or reservoir energy; the quantity and quality of oil, gas, or water; the amount and di- rection of deviation of any well from the vertical; formation, casing, tubing, or other pressures; and whether operations are being conducted with due regard to the interests of the lessor.* 221.9 DAMAGE TO MINERAL DEPOSITS� DIRECTIONAL DRILLING� LEASE OBLIGATIONS� WELL ABANDONMENT. Th8 supervisor shall require correction, in a mariner to be prescribed *For statutory citations, see note to 221.1. PART 221--OIL AND GA3 OPERATING REGULATIONS or approved by him, of any condition which is causing or is likely to cause damage to any formation containing oil, gas, or water or to coal measures or other mineral deposita, or which is dangerous to life or property or wasteful of oil, gas, or water; require substantially vertical drilling when necessary to protect interests in other properties; demand drilling in accordance with the terms of the lease or of these oil and gas operating regulations; and require plugging and abandonment of any well or wells no longer used or useful in accordance with such plan as may 6e approved or prescribed by him, and, upon failure to secure compliance with such requirement, per- form the work at the expense of the lessee, expending available public funds, and submit such report as may be needed to furnish a basis for appropriate action to ob- tain reimbursement.* 221.10 1'�ELL POTENTIALS AND PERMISSIBLE FLOW. The superviSOr is authorized to fix the percentage of the potential capacity of any oil or gas well that may be uti- lized or the permissible production of any such well when, in his opinion, euch action is necessary to protect the interests of the lessor, or to conform with proration rules established for the field; and to specify the time and method for determinin,; the potential capacity of such wells.* 221.11 WELL-SPACING AND WELL-CASING� TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE TO LESSEES. The Su- pervisor shall approve well-spacing and well-casing programs determined to be nece�- sary for the proper development of the leases and assist and advise lesaees in the planning and conduct of tests and experiments for the purpose of increasing the ef- ficiency of operations.* 221.12 PRODUCTION RECOROS;RENTALS� ROYALTIES�AND PAYMENTS; DRAINA6E AND WASTE, The supervisor shall compile and maintain records of production and prices and de- termine royalties accrued, estimate draina3e and compute lossestothe lessor result- ing therefrom, and estimate the amount and value of oil, gas, and other products wasted. The supervisor shall render monthly, to the lessee, or his agent, statemeiits showing the amount of oil, gas, casing-head or natural gasoline, propane, butane, or other hydrocarbons produced or sold and the amount or value of production accruing to the lessor as royalty from each lease; the loss by drainage or waste and the com- pensation due to the lessor as reimbursement; and, except as to any disposal of gas that shall have been determined by the Secretary of the Interior to be sanctioned by the laws of the United States an3 of the State in which it occurs, the arnount and full value, computed at a price of not less than 5 cents per 1,000 cubic feet, of all gas wasted by blowing, release, escape into the air, or otherwise. Also, as to pro- ducing leases of Indian lands and landa within naval petroleum reserves, the super- visor shall determine rental liability, record rental, royalty, and other payments, and maintain lease accounts.* 2?1.13 DIVISION ORDERS, RUN TICKETS, SALES AGREEMENTS OR CONTRACTS. The super- visor is authorized to approve, subject to such conditions as he shall prescribe, di- vision orders or temporary purchase agreements granting to transportation agencies or purchasers authorityto receive products from leased lands in accordance with Gov- ernment rules and re�ulations; sign run tickets or other receipts for royalty oil or gas delivered to a representative of the lessor or to the lessor�s account; and ap- prove sales agreemente and contracts, subject to any conditions, modification, or revocation that may be prescribed on review thereof by the Secretary.* 221.14 SUSPENSION OF OPERATIONS AND PRODUCTION. Qn receipt of an application for suepension of operations or production or for relief from any drilling or pro- ducing requirement under a lease, the supervisor shall forward such application, with a report and recommendation, to the appropriate official and, pending action thereon, grant such temporary approval as he may deem warranted in the premises, or reject such application, subject to the right of appeal ae provided in Sec. 221.66, infra.* CHAPTER II--GEOLOGICAL SURVEY 221.15 BEGINNING OR RESUMPTION OF DRILLING OR PRODUCING OPERqTIONS. Where drilling or producing operations have been suspended on a lease, the• supervisor may approve in writing notice by the lessee of intention to�begin or resu^�e such opera- tions; provided, that, whenever it appears from facts adduced by or fui•nished to him that the interestsof the lessor require additional drilling or producin� operations, the supervisor may require by notice in writing the beginning or resumption of such operations.* 1 221.16 ENFORCEMENT. The supervisor ehall enforce ing re�ulations, and his orders issued pursuant thereto � Secs. 221.53 and 221.54 of these operating regulations, _ such action is necessary or alvisable.* these oil and gas operat- by action provided for in whenever, in his judg7nent, 221.17 APPEALS ACTION. The supervisor shall receive and promptly render his - decision on any matter presented for reconsideration pursuant to Sec. 221.66, infra, _ and shall receive and promptly transmit for review all appeals pursuant to said Sec. 221.66, together with hia report in the premises.* REQUIREMENTS FOR ALL LESSEES (INCLUDING DESIGNATED OPERATORS) _ 221.18 LEASE TERMS� REGULATIONS� INSTRUCTIONS OF SUPEf2VISOR� �NASTE� DAMAGE� SAFETY, ANo BONo. The lessee shall comply with the terms of the lease, and of these _ regulations and any amendments thereof, and with the written instructions of the su- _ pervisor, shall take all reasonable precautionsto prevent waste, damageto formatione or deposits containing oil, gas, or water or to coal measures or other mineral de- . posits, and injury to life or property, and before drilling or other operations are _ started, shall have submitted a satisfactory bond.* ' �21.19 �ESIGNATED OPERATOR (OR AGENT�, In all CflS2S where operations OR a lease _ are not conducted by the recor3 owner, but are to be conducted under authority of an operatin� agreement, an unapproved assignment, or other arrangement, a"designation of operator" shall be subcnitted to the supervisor, in a manner and form approved by the supervisor, prior to co�ranencement of operations. If the designation of operator form cauuot be obtained from the lessee without undue inconvenience to the operator, the supervisor in hie discretion may accept in lieu thereof a valid operating agree- ment approved by the Secretary. A designation of operator will be accepted as author- ity of operator or his local representative to fulfill the obligations of the lessee and to sign, as operator, any papers or reports required under these oil and gas op- erating regulations. It will rest in the discretion of the supervisor to determine how a local representative of the operator empowered to act in whole or in part in his stead shall be identified. If the designated operator shall at any time be incapacitated for duty or absent from his designated address, the operator or the lessee shall designate in writing a substitute to serve in his stead, and, in the absence of such operator or of notice of the appointment of a substitute, any employee of the lessee who is on the leased lands or the contractor or other per�on in charge of operations will be considered the agent of the lessee for the service of orders or notices and service in person or by ordinary mail upon anysuch employee, contractor, or other person will be deemed service upon the operator and the lessF;e. All changes of address and any termination of the operator's authority shall be immediately reported, in writing, to the super- visor or his representative. In case of such termination or of controversy between the lessee and the designated operator, the operator, if in pos9ession of the lease- hold will be required to protect the interests of the lessor.* * I *For statutory citations, see note to 221.1. For statutory citations, see note to 221.1. 6 Pl�.RT 221--OIL AND GAS UFERATING REt,I'I.A IONS 221.20 WcLL-LOCATION RESTRICTIONS. �a) The lessee shall not urill ary well within 209 feet of any of the outer boundaries of the leased lands except where nec- essary to protect those lands against wella on land the title to which is not held by the lessor, and then only on consent first had in writing �rom the supervisor; provided, that for good cause shown in any particular case, and where not prohibited by law, a lessee may be relieved of such restrictions on written consent of the >u- pervisor. The lessee shall not drill any well within 200 faet of the boundary of' any legal subdivision without first submitting adequate reasons therefor and obtaining coflsent in writing �rom the supervisor, such consent to be subject to such conditions as may be prescribed by said official. (b) Lesseesof Indian landa shall not drill any well within 200 feet of any house or barn standing on the leased lands without the lessor's written consent, ap- proved'by the officer in charge and the superintendent,* 221.21 WELL-SPACING AND WELL-CASING PROGRAM�WELL OPERATIONS� REQUIRED OFFSET`�, DILIGENCE� COMPENSATION IN LIEU OF DRILLING. Wheri required by the supervisor, the lessee shall submit an acceptable well-spacing and well-casing program for the lease or area. Such program must be approved by the :;upervisor and may be modified from time to time as con3itions warrant, with the consent and approval of the supervisor. The lessee shall not begin to drill, redrill, repair, deepen, plug back, shoot, or plug and abandon any well, make water shut-off or formation test, alter the casing or liner, stimulate production by vacuum, •ic3, gas, air, water injection, or any other method, change the method of recoverin� product,o_i, or use any formation o�• well for gas storage or water disposal without first notiiying the supervisor of iiis p3an and intention. and recaiving written appr�vr�l prior to cotrmiencing the contemplated work. The lessee shall drill dili;ently an3 producP continuously from such wells as are necessary to protect the lessor from loss of royalty by raason of draina3e, or, in lieu tkereof, with tl-ie consent of the supervisor, he must pay a sum estimated +.,o reimburse tha lee�or i'nr ;��i,c�: loe3c of royalty�, the �um �o b� computed m�aithly by- thc� supervieor. The le::see, �vhenE;,r�,_ di•i11in�; nr producin� operation� are su�p�iidc�d f��r �� hour3 or more, shall close the riouth oi' ttie well witn a suitable plug or other fittir_gs ac- ceptable to the s�pervisor.* 221.22 WE!L DESIGNATIONS� PROPERTY BOUNDARIES� MARKERS FOR NpANDONED WELLS. The lessee snall mark each and every derrick or well. in a conspicuous place with his nan�e or the name of the operaior, the serial number of the lease or the name of the les•.�Ur if on Indian land, an3 the number and loca�io.- of the well, and shall take all necessary means an3 precautions to preser've these markings. All abandoned wells shall be marked with a permanent monument, on which shall be shown the number and location of the well, unless this requirement is waived in writing by the supervisor. This monument shall consist of a piece of pipe not less than 4 inches in diameter and not less than 10 f'eet in length, af which 4 feet shall be above the general ground level, the remainder being embedded in cement. The ton cf the pipe must be closed with a screw cap, cement plug, or by other approved !?meanr,* 221.23 WELL RECORDS AND REPORTS�PLATS AND MAPS� SAMPLES� TESTS� ANU Sl1RVEYS. Tne lessee shall keep on the leased lands 'or at his headquarter� in the field, or otherwise conveniently available to the supervisor, accurate and complete records of the drilling, redrilling, deepening, repairing, plugging, or abandonin� of all wells and of al1 other well operations, and of all alterations to casing. These records shall show all the formations penetrated, the content and character of oil, gas, or *For statutory citations, see note to 221.1. � CE�API'ER II--GEOLOGICAL SURVEY � water in each formation, and the kind, weight, size, and landed depth of casing used in drilling each well on the leased lands, and any other information obtained in the course of well operations. Within 15 days after the completion of any well and within 15 days after the completion of any ftirther operations on it, the lessee shall transmit to the super- visor copies of these records on forms furnished by the supervisor. (For reports to be made by all lessees or their designated operators, see Secs. ?21.57 to 221.65). The lessee shall take such samples and make such tests and surveys as may be required by the supervisor with a view to determining conditions in the well and ob- taining information concerning materials (formations) drilled and shall furnish such characteristic samples of each formation or substance,- or reports thereon, as may be requested by the supervisor, The lessee shall �age the production of oil, gas, and water from individual wells continuously or at reasonably frequent intervals to the satisfaction of the supervisor. � The lessee shall also suL�,,it in duplicate such other reports and records of op- erations as ma.y be required and in the manner and form prescribed by the supervisor, _ Upon request and in the manner and form prescribed by tne supervisor the lessee shall furnish a copy of the daily drilling report, a plat showing the location, des- _ ignation, and status of all wells on the leased lands, together with such other per- tir�ent information as the supervisor may require.* _ 221.24 PRECAUTIONS NECESSARY IN AREAS WHERE HIGH PRESSURES ARE LIKELY TO EXIST. When drilling in "wildcat" territory, or in any field where high pressures are likely - to exist, the lessee shall take all necessary precautions for keeping the well under _ control at all times and shall provide at the time the well is started the proper high-pressure fittings and equipment; under such conditions the conductor string of - casin� must be cemented throughout its length, unless other proc�dure is authorized _ or prescribed by the supervisor, and all strings of casing must be securely anchored.* - 221.25 CABLE TOOL DRILLING PRECAUTIONS. When drilling with cable toOls� the _ lessee shall provide at least one properly prepared slush pit, into which must be depoeited mud and cuttings from clay or shale free of sand that will be suitable for �the mudding of a well. When necessary or required, the lessee shall provide a second � pit for sand pumpings and other materials obtained from the well during the process � of drilling that are not suitable for mudding.* 221.26 ROTARY TOOL DRILLING PRECAUTIONS. yVhen drilling with rotal'y tools, the lessee shall provide, when required by the supervisor, an auxiliary mud pit or tank of suitable capacity and maintain therein a supply of mud having the proper character- istics for emergency use in case of blowouts or lost circulation.* 221.27 VERTICAL DRILLING. The lessee shall drill substantially vertical wells, material deviation from the vertical being permitted only on written approval of the supervisor and where interests in other properties will not be unfairly affected.* 221.28 WATER SHUT-OFFS, FORMATION rESTs. By approved methods, the lessee shall shut off and exclude all water from any oil- or gas-bearing stratum to the satisfac- tion of the supervisor, and to determine the effectiveness of such operations, the lessee shall make a casing and a water shut-off test before suspending drilling op- erations or drilling into the oil or gas sand and completing the well. The lessee shall test for commercial productivity all formations that give evi- dence of carrying oil or gas, the test to be made to the satisfaction of and in a *For statutory citations, see note to 221.1.. B FART 221--OIL AND GAS OFERATING REGULATIONS manner approved in advance by the supervisor. Unless otherwise specifically approved by the supervisor, formation teats shall be made at the time the formations are pene- trated and in the absence of excessive back pressure from a column of water or mud fluid. Records of such tests shall be furnished in duplicate.* 221.29 PROTECTION OF UPPER PRODUCTIVE STRATti. The lessee shall� not deepen an oil or gas well for the purpose of producing oil or gas from a lower stratum until all upper productive strata are protected to the satisfaction of the supervisor.* 221.30 �PEN FLOWS AND CONTROL OF "WILD" WELLS. The leS3ee ahall take teBSOn- able precautions to prevent any oil, gas, or water well from blowing open, or "wild", and shall take immediate steps and exercise due diligence to bring under control any such well or burning oil or gas well.* 221.31 EMu�sioN t�No DEHYDRATION. Th0 lessee shall complete and maintain his wells in such mechanical condition and operate them in such manner as to prevent, as far as possible, the formation of emulsion, or so-called B, S., and the infiltration of water, If the formation of emulsion, or B. S., or the infiltration of water, can- not be prevented or if all or any part of the product is unmarketable by reason thereof or on account of any impurity or foreign substance, the lessee shall put into marketable condition, if commercially feasible, all products produced from the leased land and pay royalty thereon without recourse to the lessor for deductions on ac- count of costs of treatment or of costs of shipping. To avoid excessive losses from evaporation, oil shall not be heated to temperatures above the minimum required to put the oil into marketable condition. If excessive temperatures are required to break down an emulsion, then other means of dehydration must be utilized. Under such circumstances the supervisor must be consulted, and his approval obtained.* 221.32 POLLUTION AND SURFACE DAMAGE. Th0 lessee shall ROt p011lltO streams OT' damage the surface or pollute the under�;round water of the leased or other land. If useless liquid products of wells cannot be treated or destroyed or if the v�lume of such products is too great for disposal by usual methods without damage, the super- visor must be consulted, and the useless liquids disposed of by sane method approved by him, * 221.33 GAGING AND STORING ol�. All production run from leased lands shall be gaged or measured according to methods approved by the supervisor, The lessee shall provide tanks located on the leasehold, unless otherwise approved by the supervisor, suitable for containing and measuring accurately all crude oil produced from the wells and shall furnish to the supervisor at least two acceptable positive copies of 100 percent-capacity tank tables. Metersfor measuring oil must be first approved by the supervisor, and tests of their accuracy shall be made when directed by that official. The lessee shall not, except during an emergency and except by special permission of the supervisor, confirmed in writing, permit oil to be stored or retained in earthen reservoirs or in any other receptacle in which there may be undue waste of oil.* 221.34 WELL ABANDONMENT. The lessee shall promptly plug and abandon or condi- tion as a water well any well on the leased land that is not used or useful for the purposes of the lease, but no productive well shall be abandoned until its lack of capacity for further profitable production of oil or gas has been demonstrated to the satisfaction of the supervisor. Before abandoning a well the lessee shall submit to the supervisor a statement of reasons for abandonment and his detailed plans for carrying on the necessary work, together with duplicate copies of the log, if it has not already been submitted, A well may be abandoned only after receipt of written approval by the supervisor, in which the manner and method of abandonment shall be approved or prescribed. Equipment shall be removed and premises at the well-site shall be properly conditioned immediately after plugging operations are completed on any well. *For statutory citations, see note to 221.1. CHAPTER II--GEOLOUICAL SURVEY g In case the lessee of lands of the United States strikes watei° wiiile drilling, instead of oil or gas, and the water is of sufficient quantity and suitable quality to be valuable and usable at a reasonable cost, the Secretary may take over the well as provided in section 40 of the Mineral Leasing Act approved June 16, 1934, 48 Stat. 977, 30 T', t;, C. 229a. If a satisfactory agreement is reached, the lessee may condi- tion the well for a water well in lieu of plugging and abandonment. I)rillin� equipment shall not be removed from any suspended drilling well without first securing the written consent of the supervisor,* 221.35 �YASTE PREVENTION� �ENEFICIAL USE. Tlle lessee i, obligated t0 PI�@VBRt the waste of oil or gas and to avoid physical waste of gas the le�see shall consume it beneficially or•market it or return it to the prod�ctive formation. If waste of gas occurs the lessee shall pay the lessor the full value of all gas wasted by blow- ing, release, escape, or otherwise, at a price not less than 5 cents i'or each 1,000 cubic feet, unless, on application by the lessee, such waste of gas under the parti- cular circumstances involved shall be determined by the Secretary to be sanctioned by the laws of the Linited States and of the State in which it occurs. The production of oil ahd gas shall be restricted to such amount as can be put to beneficial use with adequate realization of values, and in order to avoid excessive production of either oil or gas, when required by the Secretary, stiall be limited by the market demand for gas or by the market demand for oil.* 221.36 AccioFNrs nNo FIRes. The lessee shall take all reasonable precautions to prevent acc;idents and fires, shall notify the supervisor�within 24 hours of all accidents or fires on the leased land, and shall submit a full report thereon within 15 days. * 22,1.37 WORKMANLIKE OPFRATIONS. The lessee shall carry on all operations and maintain the property at all times in a safe and worlm�anlike manner, havin� due re- gard for the preservation and the conservation of the property and for the hey�.th and safety of employees. The lessee shall take reasonable steps to prevent and shull re- ���ove accumulations of oil or other materials deeme3 to be fire hazards frc;m the vi- cinity of well locations and lease tanks, and shall remove from the property or store in orderly manner all scrap or other materials not in use.* 221.38 SALES CONTRACTS� DIVISION ORDERS. Th0 leSsee Sh311 file with the Sll- pervisor triplicate (quadruplicate for production of restricted Indian lands or naval petroleum reserves) executed copies of all contracts forthe disposition of all prod- ucts of the leased land except that portion used for purposes of production on the leased land or unavoidably lost, and he shall not sell or otherwise dispns� of said pro3ucts except in :iccordance with the sales contract, division order, or �,;her ar- rangement first ap�roved, as provided in Sec. ^21.13, supra.* 2$1.39 RELIEF FF:OM OPERATING� ROYALTY� aN� RF.NTAL REQUIREMENTS. Applications for any modification authorized by 1aw of the opf;rating requirements of a lease for lands of the T7nited States :;iiall be filed in triplicate (quintuplicate for applica- tions involving leases f'or lands within the naval petroleum reserves) with the super- visor, and shall include a fu'l statement of the circumstances that render such rr:;3i- fication necessary or prop�r. Applications for any modi�ication authorized by 1aw of the royalty� or rental requirements of' a lease for lands of the L'nited States shall be filed in duplicate in �hc� United States land office of the district in which the land is situated, and report thereon will be made by the supervisor,* ti2,1.40 ROYALTY nNo RENTAI. PAYMENTS. WheII dlle in money, the lessee shall tender all payment� of rental and royalty by check or draft on a solvent bank, or by money order drawn to the order of the appro�;riate receiving officer, in accordance with *For statutory citations, see note to 221.1. 10 FART 221--OIL PSdD GAS OFERATIIVG REGULATIONS C;3APTER II--GEOLOGICAL SURVEY 11 statements rendered by the supervisor pursuant to Sec. 221.12, su�ra, or in the case of public-land leases in accordance with instructions of the General Land Office. Ii the lessor elects to take royalty in oil or gas, unless otherwise agraed upon, such royalty shall be delivered on the leasehold, by the lessee to the order of and without cost to the lessor, as instructed by the supervisor. LTpon the lessor's re- quast, storage for royalty oil for 30 days after the end of the calendar month in which the royalty accrues, shall be furnished free of charge. Storage shall be pro- vided on the leased lands or at a place mutually agreed upon by the supervisor and the lessee.* 221.41 SURFqCE RIGHTS ON INUTAN LaNDS. Lessees nf Indian land shall have only such surface rights as are specifically granted in the lease, but additional rights may be exercised under written agreement with the owner, such agreement to te subject to the prior approval of the superinteadent of the Indian agency having jurisdiction. On demand of +..he supervisor, pipe lines on Indian land shall be buried below plow depth.* 221.42 Cosrs oR DAMAGES � The lessee shall pay all costs or damages assessed under the provisions of these oil and gas operating regulations.* MEASU:3Eh;FNT OF FRODUCTION AND CO?�+]FOTATION OF ROYALTIES 221.43 MEASUREMENT oF ol�. The volume of production shall be computed in terms of barrels of clean oil of 42 standar3 United States gallons of 231cubic inches each, on the basis of ineter measurements (meter must be approved by supervisor), or tank measurements of oil-level differences, made and recorded to the nearest quarter inch of 100-percent-capacity tables, or with such qreater accuracy as shall be required by the supervisor, and subject to the following corrections. (B� CORRECTION FOR IMPURITIES.--T110 percentage Of impurities (water, sand, and other foreign substances not constituting a natural component part of the oil) shall be determinedto the satisfaction oF �he supervisor, and the observed gross volume of oil shall be corrected to exclu3e the en- tire volume of such impurities. (b) TEMPERATURE CORRECTION.--'Phe observed volume of oil corrected for impurities shall be further corrected to the standard volume at 60° F. in accordance with table 2 of Circular C-410 of the National Bureau of Stand- ards (ivlarch 4, 1936) or any revisions thereof and any supplements thereto, or any close approximation thereof approved by the supervisor. (C� GRAVITY DETERMINATION.--The �raVity Of the Oil at 60� F. Shall be determined in accordance with table 1. of Circular C-410 of the National Bureau of Standards (t,7arch 4, 1936) or any revisions thereof and any sup- ple:nents thereto. (d) LEASE PRODUCTION� PIPE-�INE RUNS.--FOZ' the convenience of the lessor and lessee, monthly statements of production and royalty shall be based in general on production recorded in pipe-line runs or other shipments. When shipments are infrequent or do not approximate actual production, the supervisor may require statements of production and royalty to be made on �Cross reference: For other liabilities of the lessee in case of default see also Secs. 221.53 to 221.56, infra. such other basie as he may prescribe, gains, or losses in volume of storage being taken into account when appropriate. Evidence of all shipments of oil shall be furnished by pipe-line or other run tickets signed by repre- sentatives of the lessee and of the purchaser who have witnessed the measure- ments reported andthe determinations of gravity, temperature, and the per- centage of impurities contained in the oil. Signed run tickets shall be filed with the supervisor within 5 days after the oil has been run.* 221.44 MeasuReMENr oF �as. Gas of all kinde (exeept gas used for purposes of production on the leasehold or unavoidably lost) is subject to royalty, and all gas shall be measured by meter (preferably of the orifice-meter type) unless otherwise agreed to by the supervisor, All gas meters must be approved by the supervisor and installed at the expense of the lessee at such �,laces as may be agreed to by the supervisor. For computing the volume of all gas produced, sold, or subjectto royalty, the standard of pressure shall be 10 ounces °bove an atmospheric pressure of 14.4 pounds to the square inch, regardless of th� ?tmospheric pressure at the point of measurement, and the standard of temperature shall be 60° F, Al1 measurements of gas' shall be adjusted by computation to these standards, regardless of the pressure and temperature at which the gas was actually measured, unless otherwise authorized in writing by the supervisor,* 221.45 �ETERMINATION OF GASOLINE CONTENT OF NATURAL Gl.S. Tests t0 determine the gasoline content of gas delivered to plants manufacturin� gasoline are re�izired to check plant efficiency and to obtain an equitable basis for allocating the gasoline output of any plant to the several sources from which the gas treated is derived. The gasoline content of the gas delivered to each gasoline plant treating gas from leased lands shall be determined periodically by field tests, as required by the su- pervisor, to be made at the place and by the methods approved by him and under his supervision.* 221.46 QUANTITY BASIS FOR COMPUTING ROYALTIES ON NATURAL GASOLINE�BUTANE� PRO- PHNE�AND OTHER LIQUID HYOROCARBON SUBSTANCES EXTRACTEDFROM GAS. ThG' prlillflty Qll3Iltlty basis for computing monthly royalties on casing-head or natural gasoline, butane, propane, or other liquid hydrocarbon substances extracted from gas is the monthly net output of the plant at which the substances are manufactured, "net output" being defined as the quantity of each such substance that the plant produces for sale. (a) If the net output of a plant is derived from the gas obtained from only one leasehold, the quantity of gasoline or other liquid hydro- carbon substances on which computations of royalty for the lease are based is t�he net output of the plant. (b) If the net gasoline output of a plant is derived from gas ob- tained from several leaseholds producing gas of uniform gasoline content, the proportion of net output o gasoline allocable to each lease as a basis for computin� royalty wi11 te determined by dividing the amount of gas de- livered to the plant fror� each leasehold by the total amount of gas deliv- ered to the plant fro�- 11 leaseholds. I(c) If the net asoline output of a plant is derived from gas obtained � from several le3seholds producing gas of diverse gasoline content, the pro- portion of net output of .�asoline allocable to each leasehold as a basis for computin� royalty will be determined by multiplying the amount of gas delivered o the plant from the leasehold by the gasoline content of the ' gas and dividing the arittur,etical product thus obtained by the sum of the similar arithmetical pro3ucts separately obtained for all leaseholds from which gas is delivered to the plant, *P'or statutory citations, see note to 221.1. • *For statutory citations, see note to 221.1. 12 FART 221--OIL AIGD GAS OFERATING REGU:.ATIONS (d) If the net output oP butane, propane, or other liquid hydrocarbon subetances of a plant is derived from gas obtained from several leaseholda, the proportion of net output of such substances allocable to each leasehold se a basie for computing royalty will be determined by substituting the butane, propane, or other liquid hydrocarbon content for the gasoline con- tent and following the method outlined in subsection 221.46 (b) or (c), supra, whichever is applicable; provided that, when in the judgment of the supervisor it is impracticable to test gas to determine the content of bu- tane, propane, or other liquid hydrocarbon substances, the gasoline content will be used in determining the proportion of the net output of such sub- etances allocable to each leasehold. (e) The supervisor is authorized, whenever in his judgment neither method preacribed in subsection 221.46 (b) and (c) is practicable, to esti- mate the production of natural gasoline, butane, propane, or other liquid hydrocarbon substances from any leasehold from (1) the ^.��antity of gas pro- duced from the leasehold and transmitted to the extraction plant, (2) the gasoline, butane, propane, or other liquid hydrocarbon content of such gas as determined by test, and (3) a factor based. on plant efficiency or re- covery and so determined asto insure full protection of the royalty inter- est of the lessor.* 221.47 VtiLUE BASIS FOR COMPUTING ROYl+LTIES_ The value of production, foi' the purpose of computing royalty shall be the estimated reasonable value of the product as determined by the supervisor, due consideration being given to the highest price paid for a part or for a majority of production of like quality in the same field, to the price received by the lessee, to posted prices and to other relevant matters. Under no circumatances shall the value of production of any of said substances for the purposes of computing royalty be deemed to be less than the gross proceeds ac- cruing to the lessee from the sale thereof or less than the valne co�nputed on such reasonable unit value as shall have been determined by the Secretary, i.n the absence of good reason to the contrary, value computed on the basis of the hi�hest price per barrel, thousand cubic feet, or gallon paid or offered at the time oY production in a fair and open market for tte major portion of like-quality oil, gas, or other prod- ucts produced and sold from the field or area where the leased lands are situated will be considered to be a reasonable value.* 221.49 ROYA�TY RATES ON OIL� FLAT-RATE LEASES. The royalty On CTude O11 ShBll be the percentage (established by the terms of the lease) of the value or amount of the crude oil produced from the leased lands.* 221.49 ROYtiLTY RATES ON OIL� SLIDING- AND STEP-SCALE LEASES (PUBLIC LAND ONLY). Sliding- and step-scale royalties are based on the average daily production per well. The supervisor shall specify which wells on a leasehold are co�nercially productive, including in that category all wells, whether produced or not, for which the annual value of permissible production would be greater than the estimated reasonable annual lifting cost, but only wells which yield a commercial volume of production during at least part of the month ehall be considered in ascertaining the average daily produc- tion per well. The average daily production per well for a lease is computed on the basis of a 28-, 29-, 30-, or 31-day month (as the case may.be), the number of wells on the leasehold counted as producin3 and the gross production from the leasehold. (Tablea for computing royalty onthe sliding-scale and on the step-acale basis may be obtained upon application to the supervisar). The supervisor will determine which co�nercially productive wells shall be considered each month as producing wells for the purpose of computing royalty in accordance with the following rules, and in his discretion may count as producing any commercially productive well shut-in for con- servation purposes: CHAPPER II--GEOLOGICAL SURVEY (a) For a previously producing leasehold, countr as producing for every day of the•�.month each previouely producing well that produced 15 days or more during the month, and disregard wells that produced less than 15 days during the month. (b) Wells approved by the supervisor as input wells ahall be counted as producing wells for the entire month if so used 15 days or more during the month and shall be disregarded if so used less than 15 days during the mont h. (c) When the initial production of a leasehold is made during the calendar month, cornpute royalty on the basis of producing well-days. (d) When a new well'is completed for production on a previously pro- ducing leasehold and produces for 10 days or more during the calendar month in which it is brought in, count such new wells as producing every day of the month, in arriving at the number of producing well-days. Do not count any new well that producesfor less than 10 days during the calendar month, (e) Consider "head wells" that make their best production by inter- mittent pumping or flowing as producing every day of the month, provided they are regularly operated in this manner, with approval of the supervisor. , (f) For previously producing leaseholds on which no wells produced for 15 days or more, compute royalty on a basis of actual producing,well- days. (g) For previously producing leaseholds on which no wells were pro- ducing during the calendar month�but from which oil was shipped; conpute royalty at the same royalty percentage as that of the last preceding cal- endar month in which production and shipments were normal. (h) Rules for special cases not subject to definition, such as those arising from averaging the production from two dietinct sands or horizons when the production of one sand or horizon is relatively insignificant com- pared tothat of the other, shall be made by the supervisor as need arises. (i) In the followin� summary of operations on a typical leasehold for the month of June, the we11s considered for the purpose of computing royalty on the entire pro3uction of the property for the month are indicated. Well Tso. Record 1 Produced full tir.me for 3p days ............................ 2 Produced for 26 days; down 4 days for repairs ............. 3 Produced for 28 days; down June 5, 12 hours, rods; June 14, 6 hours, engine down; June 25, 24 hours; June 26, 24 hours, pulling rods and tubing ............... 4 Produced for 12 days; dowri June 13 to 30 .................. 5 Produced for 8 hours every other day (head well) .......... 6 Idle producer (not operated) .............................. 7 Iv'ew well, campleted June 17; produced for 14 days ......... 8, New well, completed June 22; produced for g days .......... Count (marked � X) X X X X • X In this example there are eight wells on the leasehold, but wells 4, *For atatutory citations, see note to 221.1. 6, and 8 are not counted in computing royalties. Wells 1, 2, 3, 5, and 7 13 14 PART 221--OIL AND GAS OPERATING REGULATIONS are counted as producing for 30 days. The average production per well per dayis determined by dividing the total production of the leasehold for the month (i.ncludingthe oil produced by wells 4 and 8) by 5, the number of wells counted asproducing, and dividing the quotient thus obtained by the number of days in the month.* 221.50 ROYALTY oN �ns. The royalty on gas shall be the percentage established by the terms of the lease of the value or amount of the gas produced. (a) Royalty accrues on dry gas, whether produced as such or as residue gas after the extraction of gasoline. (b) If the lessee derives revenue on gae from two or more products, a royalty normally will be collected on all such producte. (c) For the purpose of computing royalty the value of wet gas shall be either the gross proceeds accruing to the lessee from the sale thereof or the aggregate value determined by the Secretary of all commodities, including residue gas, obtained therefrom, whichever is greater.* 221.51 ROYALTY ON CASING-HEAD OR NATURAL GASOLINE, BUTANE� PROPANE� OR OTHER LIQUID HYDROCARBON SUBSTANCES EXTRACTED FROM GAS. A royalty as provided iri th0 12852 shall be paid on the value�of one-third (or the lessee�s portion if greater than one- third) of all casing-head or natural gasoline, butane, propane, or other liquid hydro- carbon substances extracted from the gas produced from the leasehold. The value of the remainder is an allowance for the cost of manufacture, 'and no royalty thereon is required. The value shall be so determined that the minimum royalty.accruing to the lessor shall be the percentage established by the lease ofthe amount or value of all extracted hydrocarbon substances accruingto the leesee under an arrangement, by con- tract or otherwise, for extraction and sale that has been approved by the supervisor: (a) When a minimum price established by the Secretary is used in de- termining the value of natural gasoline accruing to the lessee, the volume of such gasoline may be corrected when deemed necessary bythe supervisor to such standard and by such method as may be approved by the supervisor, in order that volumetric differences between natural gasolines of various speci- fications may be equitably adjusted. (b) The present policy is to allow the use of a reasonable acnount of dry gas for operation of the gasoline plant, the amount allowed being de- termined or approved by the supervisor, but no allowance shall be made for boosting residue gas, or other expenses incidental to marketing.* 221.52 ROYALTYONDRIP GASOLINE OR OTHER NATURAL CONDENSATE. The royalty On 311 drip gasoline, or other natural condensate recovered from gas produced fromthe leased lands without resort to manufacturing process shall be the same percentage as pro- vided inthe lease for other oil, except that such substance, if procesaed in a casing- head gasoline plant shall be treated for royalty purposes as though it were gasoline.* PROCEDURE IN CASE OF DEFAULT BY LESSEE 221.53 SHUTTING DOWN OPERATIONS� LEASE CANCELATIONS. The 9upetvi80r has 8u- thoritytoshut down any operation and place under seal any property or equipment for failure to comply with these oil and gas operating regulations or orders issued here- under, to enter upon any leasehold and perform any operation that the lessee fails to *For statutory citations, see note to 221.1. CHAPTER II--(�OLOGICAL SURVEY 15 perform when ordered so to do in writing, and to recommend cancelation of the lease and forfeiture under the bond for noncompliance with the applicable law, lease terme, and regulations.* 221.54 LiQu1oA7Eo DAMAGES. Admini8trative costs arising out of certain de- faults or violationsof orders requiring the performance of certain duties by lessees, as set forth in these oil and gas operating regulations, constitute loss or damage to the United States the amount of which is difficult or impracticable of ascertainment. Therefore, the following amounts shall be deemed to cover euch loss or damage and sha11 be payable upon receipt of notice from the oil and gas aupervisor of such loss br damage; provided, that as to subsection (f) hereof the specified loss or damage shall be applicable to each week or fraction thereof during which the violation con- tinues and as to subsection (h) hereof the specified loss or damage •hall b applic,a- ble to each day or fraction thereof during which the violation continues: (a) For failure to perform any operation ordered in writing by the supervisor, if said operation is thereafter performed by or through the supervisor, the actual cost of performance thereof and an additional 25 percent to compensate the Government for administrative costs. (b) For failure to maintain inviolate any seal placed upon any prop- ertf or equipment by the supervisor, �50 for each such violation. (c) For failure to file notice of intention and to obtain approval before starting to drill, or for failure to file notice and obtain ap- proval before making any changes in the originally approved notice of in- tention, �25 for each violation. � (d) For failure to file notice and to obtain approval before repair- ing, redrilling, deepening, plugging-back, plugging, or abandoning any well, in pulling or altering casing, stimulating production by vacuum, acid, or shot, or gas, air, or water injectzon, or using any well or formation for gas storage or water disposal, �25 for each violation. (e) For failure to mark wells or derricks, �10 for each violation. (f) For failure toinstall required high-pressure fittings and equip- ment, to cement conductor string, or to anchor properly all strings of cas- ing, �50 for each violation, (g) For failure to construct and maintain in proper condition slush or mud pits, �10 for each violation. (h) For failure to comply with Sec. 221.32, supra, �25 for each vio- lfltlOri. (i) For failureto file eales contractsor division orders as required � by lease terms, �25 for each violation, and for failure to submit pipe-line � run tickets, or other proper evidence of diaposal as required by these regulations, �10 for each violation. (j) For failure to file the following reports within the time speci- fied in these oil and gas operating regulations, or within such other time designated in writing by the supervisor, �10 for each violation; 1. Log of well, subsequent report of drilling, redrilling, deep- ening, plugging-back, plugging and abandonment, making water *For statutory citations, see note to 221.1. 16 PART 221--O�L AND GAS OPERATING REGULATIONS shut-off or�f'ormation �test, stimulating production by acid or shot. 2. Lessee's Monthly Report of Operations. Daily Report of Gas- Produoing' Wells, when required. Lessee�s Statement of Oil and Gas Runs and Royalties, 3. Special forms or reports as required by the supervisor.* 221.55 PAYMENT oF DAMAGES. P3ymerit or request for payment for any of the dam- ages assessed for adminietrative costs under these regulations shall not relieve the lessee from compliance with the provisions of these regulations, or for liability for waste or any other damage. A waiver of any particular cause for the payment of dam- ages shall not be construed as precluding the assessment of damages for.any other cause herein specified or for the same cause occurrine at any other.time. Damages shall be paid in the manner and as directed by the supervisor.* 221.rJ6 �AMAGES TO �NDIAN PROPERTY. Dama�e to lands, crops, buildings, 3Iid other improvementson Indian land shall be assessed by the superintendent, and payments for such damages shall be made to the superintendent.* � REPORTS TO BE MADE BY ALL LESSEES (INCLUflING OPERATORS) 221.57 GENERAL REQUIREMENTS. Information required to be submittedin accordance with these oil and gas operating regulations shall be furnished in the manner and form prescribed in these regulataons or as directed by the supervisor. Prescribed standard forms in pene.ral use are described in Secs. 221.58--221.64, infra. Copies of such forms can be obtained from the supervisor and must be filled out completely and filed punctually with that official. Failure of the lessee to submit the information and reports required herein constitutes noncompliance with the terms of these oil and gas operating re�ulations and is cause for the assessment of specific damages as pre- scribed by these regulations and the cancelation of the lease.* 221.58 SUN�RY NOTICES AND REPORTS ON WELLS (FORM q-331A PUBLIC; FORM 9-3318 INDI�AN�, Forms 9-331A and 9-3318 cover all notices of intention and all subsequent reports pertain}ng to individual wells except those for which special blanks are pro- vided, The forms cnay be used for any of the purposes listed thereon, or a special heading may be inserted in the blank to adapt it for use for similar purposes. Any written notice of intention to do work or to change plans previously approved must be .filed in tri}�licate, unless otherwise directed, and must reach the supervisor and receive his approval before the work is begun. The lessee is responsible for receipt of the notice by the supervisor in ample time for proper consideration and action. If, in case of emergency, any notice is given orally or by wire, an3 approval is ob- tained, the transaction shall be confirmed in writin� as a matter of record. The following paragraphs illustrate some of the uses to which forms 9-331A and 9-3318 may be put and indicate the requirements with respect tc each use, (a) ' NoTicE oF INTENTION To DRILL.—Th2 notice of intention to drill a well must be filed with the supervisor and approval received before the work is be�un. This notice must �;ive the location, in feet, and direction from the nearest lines of established public survey; the altitude of the ground and derrick floor above sea level and how obtained; and the geologic name of the surface formation. iTnder the heading "Details of Works", the proposed drilling and casing plan should be outlined in detail. Essential information includes type of tools, proposed depth to which the well will *For statutory citations, see note to 221.1. CHAPTER II--GEOLOGICAL SURVEY be drilled, estimated depths to the top of important markers, estimated depths at which water, oil, gas, and mineral beds are expected, the pro- posed casing record, including the size and weight of casing, the depth at which each string is to be set, and the amount of cement and mud to be used. Information also shall be given relative to the drilling plan, such as mak- ing drill-stem testa, drilling in with oil, using reversed circulation, perforating opposite pays, using special typea of mud in rotary drilling, coring at specified depths, and using electric logging to�ether with any other information which may be required by the supervisor. �b� NOTICE OF INTENTION TO CHANGE PLANS.—Where unexpected COnditi0II6 necessitate any change in the plans of proposed work already approved, com- plete detaile of the changes must be submitted to the supervisor and ap- proval thereof obtained before the work is u.ndertaken. �C� NOTICE OF DATE FOR CASING AND WATER .iHUT-OFF TEST.—The protec- tion and segregation of oil, gas, or water-bearing formations is an im- porta.nt item of conservation, and the supervisor will witness all casing and water shut-off tests. Notice must be filed with the supervisor in ad- vance of the date on which the lessee expects to make such test. Later by agreement the exact time shall be fixed. The casing test and the test of water shut-off must be approved before further dri:ling can proceed. In the event of failure, caeing inust be repaired or replaced or recemented, whichever the conditions may require. �d� SUBSEQUENT REPORT OF CASING AND �lATEk SHUT-OFF TEST, —P?ithiri 15 days after making a casing or water shut-off test, the result� of the test must be reported. The report must give comFlete and accurate details, amount of mud and cement used, iap:>e of time between riu �_ing and cementing the casinq and r�aking the test, method of testin�, and resul.te. �e� NOTICE OF INTENTION TO REDRILL� REPAIR, OR CONDITION 'rVELL.—Before repairing, deepening, or conditioning a well, a detai�•d written statement of the plan of work must be filed with the superviso; and approval obtained before the work is started, In work that affect� only rods, pumps, or tub- ing, or other routine work, such as cleaning ,�.t to previous total depth, no report is necessary unless specifically renuired by the supervisor. �f) SUBSEQUENT REPORT OF REDRILLING� REPAIRING� OR CONDITIONING. — Within 15 days after completion of the repair work a detailed report of work done andthe results obtained should be filed. Such report shall show the amount of production of oil, eas, and water, both before and after the work is done, and shall also include a complete statement of the work ac- complished and methods employed, including all dates. (g� NOTICE OF INTENTION TO USE EXPLOSIVE OR CHEMICA�.,. —BeFore using explosive or chemicals (shooting or acidizing) in any well, whether for in- creasing production or in drilling, repair, or abandonment, _:otice of in- tention shall be filed and approval obtained before the work-s done. When such notice of intention forms a part of a notice of iri`-ention to redrill, repair, or abandon a well, the supervisor may accept such notice in lieu of a separate notice of intention to use explesive or cherr!icals. The notice of intention to use explosive or chemicals must be accompanied by the com- plete log of the well to date, provided the complete log has not previously been filed, and must state the object of the work to be done, the amount and nature of the material to be used, its exact location and distribution in the well by depths, the method �f localizing its effects, and the name of the company that is to do the work. The notice �hall also contain an accurate statement of the dates aiid daily production of oil, gas, and water from the well for each of the last preceding 10 producing days, i? 18 PART 221--OIL AND GAS OPERATING REGULATIONS �h� SUBSEQUENT REPORT OF USE OF EXPLOSI.VE OR CHEMICALS. —After ueiilg explosive or chemicals in any well a subsequent report must be filed with the supervisor. This report shall be file3 separately within 15 days after the work is done, unless such report is included in the log as a part of a report of other subsequent work done or as a part of an abandonment report any one of which shall have been filed within that period. The subsequent report of use of explosive or chemicals shall in��c�.e a statement of' the amount and the nature of the material used, its exact location and distri- bution in the well by depths, and the method used to localize its effects. The report shall also contain an accurate statement of the dates and daily production of oil, gas, an3 water for each of the last 10 producing days preceding the use of explosive or chemicals and a similar statement of pro- duction after the work is done. In a3dition, this report must include other pertinent information, such as the depthto which the well was cleaned out, the time spent in bailing and cleaning out, and any injuries to the casin� or well. �1� NOTICE OF INTENTION TO PULL� PERFORATE� OR OTHERWISE ALTER CASING.— If any casing is to be pulled, perforatPd, or otherwise altered, notice of intentiori must be filed and approved before the work isstarted. Such notice must give full details of the contemplated work, statin� fully what changes are intended and what results are anticipated. A notice of intention to perforate the casing shall state the conditione of the well that make such work desirable; whether it is to be ripped or shot, the depth, number, and size of shots, or if ripped, the depths of the rips proposed; the produc- tion of oil, gas, and water; and, if a log of the wel•1 has not already been filed, the notice should be accompanied b;� a duplicate copy of the lop; show- ing all casin� seats as well as all water strata and all oil and �as shows. �J� SUBSEQUENT REPORT OF PULLING� PERFORATING� OR OTHERYJISE ALTERING CASING.—If any casing has been pulled, perforated, or otherwise altered, the resultsofthe work should be reported within 15 3�ys after the comple- tion of such work, stating exactly wYiat was done and the results obtained, including any change in production. The report of perforating casing also should include the niunber, depth, and size of shots, the date shot, and who did the sYiooting, If ripped, the depths and number of rips should be stated. The production of oil, gas, and water obtained by the work should be shown. �k� NOTICE OF INTENTION TO ABANDON WELL. —B2fOSE beg1RR1IIu, abandon- ment work on any well, xhether drillin� well, oil or gas well, water wel:l, or so-called dry hole, notice of intention to abandon shall be filed with the supervisor and approval obtained before the work � tarted. The no- tice must show the reason for abandonment and must be accompanied by a com- plete log, in duplicate, of the well to date, prov�ded the complete log has not been filed previously, and must give a de ailed statement of the pro- posed work, including .ich �nformation as kind, location, and length of plugs (by depths), and plans for mudding, cementin�, shootin�,testing, and removing casing, as well as any other pertinent information. �1� 5U8SEQUENT REPORT OF ABANDONMENT. After 3 WEll 1S abandoned OI' plugged a subsequent record of work done must be filed with the supervisor. This report stiall be filed separately within 15 days after the work is done. The report shall give a detailed account of the manner in which the aban- dorunent or plugging work was carried out, includin� the nature and quanti- ties of materials used in plugging and the location and extent (by depths) of the plu�s of different materials; records of any tests or measurements made and of the amount, size, and location (by depths) of casin�; left in the well; and a detailed statement of the volume of mu3 fluid used, and the pressure attained in mudding. If an attempt was made to part aiiy casing, CHAPTER II--GEOLOGICAL SURVEY a complete report of the methods used and resulta obtained must be in- cluded.* 19 221.59 �OG ANDHISTORY OFWELL (FORM g-33p). The 105See Sh311 furnish i.n dllpll- cate, on form 9-330, to the supervisor, not later than 15 days after the completion of each well, a complete and accurate log e.nd history, in chronologic order, of all op- erations conducted on the well. If a log is compiled for geologic information from cores or formation samples, duplicate copie.� of such log shall be filed in addition to the regular log. Duplicate copies of all electric logs, temperature surveys, or direction surveys shall be furnished. The lessee shall require the drillers, whether using company labor or contract labor, to record accurately the depth, character, fluid content, and fluid levels, where possible, of each formation as it is penetrated, together with all other pertinent information obtained in drilling the well. The practice of compiling well logs from memory, after the work has been completed, will not be permitted.* 221.60 �uIONTHLY RFPORT OF OPERATIONS (FORM g-32q PU�LIC; FORM 9-329A �NDIAN�. A separate report of operations for each lease must be made on form 9-329 for public land and on form 9-329A for Indian land, for each calendar month, beginning with the month in which drilling operations are initiated, and must be filed =n duplicate with 'the supervisor on or before the 6th day of the succeeding month, unless an extension of time for the filing of such report is granted by the supervisor. The report on this form shall disclose accurately all operations�con3ucted on each well during each month, the status of operations on the last day of the month, and a general sunm�ary of the status of operations on the leased lands, and ii_n report must be submitted each raonth until the lease is terminated or until omission of the report is authorized by the supervisor. It is particularly necessary that the report shall show for each calendar month: (a) The lease be identified by inserting the name of the Unite3 States land office and the serial.number, or in the case of Indian land the lease number and lessor's name, in the space provided in the upper right corner; (b) Each well be listed separately by number, its location be given by 40-acre subdivision (1/4 1/4 sec. or lot), section number, township, range, and meridian; (c) The number of days each well produced, whether oil or gas, and the number of days each input well was in operation be stated; (d) The quantity of oil, gas, an3 water produce3, the total amount ef gasoline, an3 other lease products recovered, and other required information. When oil and gas, or oil, gas, and gasoline, or other hy3rocarbons are con- currently produced from the same lease, separate reports on this form should be submitted for oil and for gas and gasoline, unless otherwise authorized or directed by the supervisor. (e) The depth of each active or suspended well, and the name, charac- ter, and depth of each formation drille3 during the month, the date each such depth was re�3ched, the date ani reason for every shut-down, the names an3 depths of important formation ehanges and content5 of formations, the amount and size of any casing run since last report, the dates and results of any tests such as production, water shut-off, or gasoline content, and any other noteworthy information on operatione not specifically provided for in the form. (f) The footnote must be completely filled out as required by the supervisor. If no runs or sales were made during the calendar month, the report must so state.* *For statutory citations, see note to 221.1. 20 PART 221--OIL AND GAS OPERATING REGULATIONS CHAP'PER II--GEOLOGICAL STTRVEY 21 Z?1.61 �AILY REPORT OF GAS-PRODUCING WELLS (FORM g-352). [JR1eSS otherwise di- rected by the supervisor, the readings of all meters showin�; production of natural gas from leased �ands shall be submitted daily on form 9-35?, together with the meter charts. After a check has been had the meter charts will be returned.* 221.62 STATEMENT OF OIL AND GAS RUNS ANO ROYALTIES (FORM 9-361 PUBLIC; FORM 9-361A INoIAN). When directed by the supervisor, a monthly report shall be made by the lessee in duplicate, on form 9-361 or 9-361A, showing each run of oil, all sales of gas, gasoline, other lease products, an3 the royalty accrui.n� therefromto the lessor. 4Vlien use of this form is require!i it must be completely fillc�d out and sworn to.* 221.63 ROYALTY AND RENTAL REMITTANCE (FORM g-614A INDIPN', FOI'ID g-E14A, COIR- pletely filled out an3 signed, shall be submittedtothe supervisar in triplicate and shall accompany each remittance covering pa;�nents of royalty or rental on Indian lands. * 221.64 ROYALTY AND RENTAL REMITTANCE (FORM 11ND NAVAL PETROLEUM 4iF'SFFt'JFS�. FOITII 17T;D, completely filled out and si�ned, must accompany each remiita�i��. ooverin� pa�- inents of roy-alty or rental on naval petroleum reserves. The remittanc�: :ii.l the orifz- inal form shall be sent direct to the Property Accounting Officer,T'nited States Navy, ureau of Supplies and Accounts, Travy Department, N�'ashington, D. C. ,..nd thF duplicatf; an3 triplicate copies of the form shall be sent to the oil and gas supervisor.* ?.21.65 `.�FeGIaL FORMS OR REPORTS. t4'hen special forms or reports ott�er than those referred to in these regulations may be necessary, instructions for the filing oi such forms or reports will be given by the supervisor.* 221.66 APPEALS. Ari appeal fror; any order issued under authority of these regu- lations may be filed as hereinafter set forth in this section. Compliance with any such order shall not be suspended by reason of an appeal having been taken unless such suspension is authorized in writing by the Director, or the Secretary (depen3ent ugon the officer with whom the appeal is pending), and then only upon a 3etermination that such suspension will not be detrimental to the lessor or upoii the submission and ac- ceptance of a bond deemed adequate to indemnify'the lessor from loss or 3amage. (a) An appeal to the Director may be taken from any order of the su- pervisor by filing such appeal with the latter officer �nrithin 20 �iays after service of the order. The appeal shall incorporate or be accompanied by such written sliowing and argument on the facts and law as the appellant may deem ade�uate to justify reversal or modification of the order. All state- mants of facts must be made under oath. (b) The supervisor shall transmit the appeal an3 accompanyin�; papers to the Director with a full report and recomn,endations in the premises and that officer shall review the record and render such a decision in the case as he deems proper. (c) An appeal from any iecision of the Director may be taken to the Secretary within 30 3ays after service of the Director's decision. The appeal shall be accompanied by such written showin� and argument on the facts an3 law as appel.lant may deem adequate tojustify reversal or modif'i- cation of the 3ecision. Any statetnent of facts not submitted to the Pi- rector .nust be made ur.der oath. (�i) Oral araument in any case I�ending before the supervisor, the Di- rector, or tY�e Secretary will be allowed on motion in the discretion of such offi�er and at a time to be fixed by him. *For statutory citations, see note to 221.1. (e) The procedure for appeals involving leases for public land shall be followed for leases on the naval petroleum reservee and Indian land ex- cept that, with regard to the naval petroleum reserves, the Director of Naval Petroleum Reserves, and with regard to Indian land, the Commissioner of Indian Affairs will exercise the functions vested in the Director.* ?21.67 EFFECTIVE �ATE OF THESE OIL AND GAS OPERATING REGULATIONS� REPEAL OF PRIOR REGULATIONS. Th2SE oil and gas operatin� regulations shall become effective on the first day of dune, 1942, and siiall supersede the oil and gas operating regulations of rlovember 1, 1936, as amended, 1 F, R. 1996-2003, 56 I.D. 415, Title 30 C. F. R„ Ch. II, Secs. 221.1-2,21.56, except as to leases and unit agreements in force and ef- fect on June 1, 1942, to which these operating regulations are not applicable.*# *For statutory citations, see note to u�1.1. #Idot applicable on said effective date to lands acquired under the act known as the Appalachian Forest Act of March 1, 1911, 36 Stat. 961, to lands in national parks, to lands withdrawn or reserved for military or naval uses or purposes, except naval petroleum reserves, orto lands within the Osage Indian Reservation. Recommended for approval. W. C. P,?endenhall, Director of the Geological Survey. Approved: P?arch 23, 1942. Harold L. Ickes, Secretary of the Interior. Approved: bday 23, 1942. James Ferrestal, Acting Secretary of the A'.avy. Approved: P.?ay 25, 1942. Franklin D. Roosevelt, President of the United States. ie9zio UNITED STATES UEPAR'I'MEti�T OF THE INTERIOR G�;pLOGIC�AL S(7RVEY INDEX TO P�IAf'S OF ALABAMA ORDER MAPS BY NAMES PRINTED IN RED AND BY SERIES DESIGNATION ALL MAPS SHOWN ON THIS INDEX ARE DISTRIBUTED BY THE GEOLOG[CAL SURVEY � � INTERlOR—GEOLOGICAS. SIIP.VEY. WASHINGTOti, U. C. .SChZC 1,'i:r.l�i)�' . 10 - ___— .n !Si1ee — — __-3— — 30 0 N 8(] 4J EO Kil[II11eiPSB � UMTED STI�TES DEPARTMENT OF Ti�E INTERIOR GEOLOGICAL `�RVEY INDEX 70 MAPS OF ARKANSAS ORDER MAPS BY NAMES PRINTED IN RED AND BY SERIES DESIGNATION ALL MAPS SHOWN ON TH1S INDEX �RF' IIICTRIRI1T�ll RV `! NF' r�'ni nr_irni CI ID\/CV � �00000 inrERioa—cEo�ec�ca�sukv=y,wasyindF;.4l,�.C�CNP.L INFORMA�I��ON CONCERNING THE pROGF2ESS UF MAF'PiNC., Itv � � 3 w_ __aa ao �bIIes �� ARKANSAS MAY BE GB�FAINED FROM THE CFNFRHL REGIGiV ENGINEER. ���- r_r—�— _ — — —_—.� U. S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, BOX 133. ROLLA, MISSOL7RI. ��R THE MAR �$�Tfl �_� � ao � soTi�ilometers INFORISAT(G)N OFFICE, U. S. 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I�ound.ir� bet��•cen the F,'.�opi��n ��ondcro.�� aml F,rng;/rn ros��� z�n���; in Tcxas ihis i� thc houn�l��r}� b��tncr-r. tL�� T.�}�lor muil ��it1 t�ic �.1V"AI'PO {;POUjI. I����l linc� d. Diplu.echrza cr� facc�u zone. �i;e�( line e. Bonnd.iry h��h��rrn tlu� Au�tin chnik :�n�l T:�> lor itiurl in 'I ��� -�:��1 bet«�r�en hed� of An,tin and Ta�'lnr ;��_e in oth�r purt� af ih� Cos-•al E� ' �.11ll. � a �e. roni n � � Tu R � um;uu, in .nl Rrd liuc f. Iio��nil.�r�• h�i�ccen bed� of �C�'�n - ..,1' � G ' �U t��� • f'����. 11 tZ���( line� r�. T3oun�iar�� br°hcecn tLe Comun� hc� �n 1( „t �i rie�� Thi. ha� u , taken as tlie houuciarv bet«���en tlie I.u��er and L�����cr Cretxc��ot:�- h',it tl�e I.o�eei• Cretacrou� (Albi,in) ;i;:t� o� '�i� Del Rio �•l:i�, Bt�da limc ��.^.c and Gra}�son marl tncmber of th�� ll_ni=on fa�mation, is disptit���: `�}' wme ,�uthoritic�. K���l liu� h. I3oundtu•y between tlie I're�ieri�•k,btu� .'ri «-a.•h�ta grou� ��. ll 1�. lir�i line i. Boundaiy' bet���cen tl�e Trin�ty .ind F�F �.r�r:cl.�hurK Kio � I;c�l linc j. 13a�c of thc Ti•inity nrouP and bed, of :. ir.i<< .i=�. } �Y • , Prepared under the suapices of the Committee on StratiRraphy Ghart No. 9 - CORRELAT ION UF THE OUTCROP.PINCi GRETACEOUS FORMATIONS OF THE ATLANTIG AND GULF GUASTAL PLAIN AND TRANS - PEGOS TEXAS' of the National Kesearch Council, Cari o. Dunbar, Chairman. By Lloyd W. StephenRon, Philip B. King, Watson H. iVlonroe, and Ralph W. Imlay AD I55. MISS/SSIPPf . ALABAMA ALA.- GA. GEORG/A S.CAROL/NA N.CAROL/NA VlR61NfA MARYLAND DEL•AWARE NEW �ERSEY A7LANTIC BuIL GeoL Soc. ,Am., V01. 63 NORTNEAST TEXAS-�KLAHOMA �QRKANSAS TENN£SSEE Peedee River Cepe Fear No�/awoy La�i�ude o! Northern Gloucester Monmou�h Georpes Bonk EUROPEAN T E X A S Au9us�o Vafle Rive� Val�e River Ba/�imore 00�� Gounty Goun�y go�que�eau STAGfS C�iENERALlZEO FAUNAL ZONES MEXICO �i�ude o� La�rlude o� La�itude ol La�i�ude ol Hunl, Fonnin, Lonyi�ude o/ Lonyi�ude o/ Lonqilude o) Southwas/em M�l�o�s��� LLex �Ceaol �Se�me °, M ssiss ppi Tupelo d-�ox LGo/umbus` rLivnyslon CBL ndenB SQCamden Mo�/lgomery Un on Sprinqs Rv/er� reqione Y 1' $TANOARD SECT/ON ,q�a l�niomrm s GNsos�'a.^'a� G�oss For� Sierra Dioblo Longilude ol Longi/ude o� Longilude o� Longilude ol Lonqi�u0e o/ Long,lude of Langilude o/ Lo�i�ude o/ �a Poris G/arksviUe Po�� 9 � ik�d� � Ronges of impor�aN 9e K n� k fuROPEAN D/��S�ONS �N sa.dh ol Te���� y,��jy Manroins Slocklon B�onco Pla�eau Eagie Poss Anococho Mt Uvo/G? dHaros Caslroville Son ANonio New Braunleis Ausfrn Toylor Woca Corsicano Dollas,Terrell G�aysoncounhes Cammerc il I j I ERIES mdex �ossils Conchos S�erro B/anca �'�' . . i I I � �SlAGfS W£SL INTERIOR � � .� � i �, � '� � I � � � ��i� I�, , ' �� , � ���.� �� � �,� � �I � � � � � � � �� I � I � i L ARAMIE I I�'�, � ! 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Bcssom sand � nd � Tanfr�eerod � TaM�be - - - - - � . �''�'�'� s°'� �Tomdqxesmd 4i TaMiqDeesme� , � � lam�arion Moqolhy _ u iu - � � , � � � � - � '� � I � � � evenmoid �+vnmeHdasv�r,� �, � Blossom smd F �- `' , i '. .� � .� ��. . � � . � - -- - � � A stin ? 7 �' ��� - 3 � �" � � � i �. � /ormorbn /amo�ion � � B ' �, . , . � , � �, I . , 9 � � - - - - 9 - - - A�slin u Bm�om . kio o � �. ; t o o � � .��i� . i., .� � 7 � . 9 To ■� g � �' � 4 �i � c 9—�� '�� o i 'i � � , . i . � . , . ,, i '� �� cholk cno;k W ) o ° � � � � � . 7 , ., �, . , �s.,,: ,..�,.._.: �� Bonhom Bonhom i � ° o � , � I 4 2 � I I � ��� �. � � I i� '��'' � fm 4�slrn Aushn Auslin Aushn Auslin , Auslin Ausfin ,.,��� formolion 4+ � 0 4? l� � , � � , J � i � � . . �. �, . . ���I 4ushn '� G,:s'�- Auslin Aus �. I I � 4, 4i 9 7 7 I i I � �' I I�' I I� I I 9-_ O Ra a_. nocr:�+us I � �.. � I � i I I i.. ' ' � ''. I i� Ik thdk c�o;k . .cMlk cAolk tMlk equiw�enls eWrvolenls �, . .'. 9 . , , , i r NIOBRA � ,iMwpro-d�corus i I �� Q � � I� ' I ' � � I . , . � '� � Q -, I� � ,, , ., ., �. I.�,,, I I ,paik chalk cholk cDo/k c�alk cM uar o clor e wv. _c or e u�e y I; . .. ,. � � I TURONIAN c:' I I I t — � � I I I � I'� �' � I - � I rN 7 I ,nrso _ � i I L E 7 0 I 2 7 8 i u Z . -9 . I . � on I � 9 � � I I . I I I I � I QUNCO . 5 I I I I � oQ � � � � � �� � � c � I � �, �. . .. ,.', ��� — 7 i �j i� `�� � . I lr:.�, krd shole Eagle Fa0 sl+ole ll � . . . , . . I ��� E e Fad � l7 � � � � . , / � I Fo'0 n I ��I � . � '. . 9 � UU . . EO G � I . . - , O 7 i F rd � I o I � �iO . Eo e 9 I , t� � r.. � 0!1 Navo Sca i 5 r I i J J I 5 I I (u 9 _ i- - � � _ F I , I I � I F __- I ad I _ I - r _ � _ loose. boulder 'I q� � I i i i � 5 ���� i I •i shole sho/e snole _oge _ �h ,� � i i r� 9 0/ /oss�lilerous , � � �. O -�s'•ea 4,pub-s - ,.. �� _ i ! ' � , i Ea le Ford Eogle Fo�d � , - - - - - - - - - - - �- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - . � a,o,prqp,s ;se.erWl c,-.. _. . /E;,; r � �'�y+ _�ye Ford , I � � . . . i 9 Eogle Ford Eog�e Ford ? � .. Ea IeFadsMb shole � . - ---J � � �aonran Or"O=° -" � . � I���. � snaie sna/e Eoqk Fad - � Fadshole 9 � '� O I . . ��. � 9 � � = � i � . i � i Q, r ��_ Tuswloow 7uscalooso Tuscnvosa Tuscoloosa 7uscaloosa 7uscaloosa 7uscaloosa 7us,alaosa Roriran Roriton Ro��ron sondy!�oAbrw� 7 q IAN � BENTON � vcromvs �abuNs-� ,. ,,. -:,� sno�e � ��� � � �� .. � �� � shole sho�e sho/e EaqleFird snole _o art1 � q . . u ON o •. �o..-�•.y . -. - � . I ! , . I I � - . � ! � 7 . q . �. , Tuscdoosa /p��ion /ormotion lormorion . � uscolooso U ' � _ - - _ , � ,. � � �: � �I Tufcdoosa� � aos �►m-^ ► i �_ � -.J . . . .. in lrshe�mon's SHALE ' �+rerca � - - - _ _- - - _ - - - - - - ' ... , , ri , . . � � I .. � . . 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I � i . �I � , � - . � I � � � I � �� � � � � � - i NO MANIAN I GE I mo- SANOSTONE � �� � - � � �, � r�� Budo� ���'es•;ne Hudo limesfa�e Budo limeslme � 9 � � � g�,: - --•e a,,.x ^�eslone Budc .rmes'Ue ;n� _� �e R�o clo � ad nr+'�I+s'^ c � � i � _ (No hrgner beds � lNo higher �I � � Del Rio �^����^ 's � �'�'� ? � � � � � � � -as De� R c= De� Rm doy n „ , . N�n St e iv Mo'" 5' s' 40 subwbce sro4n ', 3 � I � I . r_a��ce soc � � _ , Rio c�c ! ds ex sedl �,� .:' , � 1 � . c . - ed De . Po ° o ; i t u�� _ , . - .- ex os 9 Mo n S �i i i� _� ,� rw �... cb P q 2 �.- .N s s aacrdrq� , , . _ . r - . o ^ _ Po.por , �6 � . . , I : - C - k hi/o �. � c I . 9 +���� e'eFwx R sne k cW ro k v o � c }..v. e�v. a _-- w iu 3 — Bo t Y I I I a9d' -.c . -2 i"y' Georqe�o..^ E � ; ., ; . ! a � PowPawew•'� � Y' J � m � ,�e�+c c�c . lormolior . xe Imb /9�0 $ I �� . . . � �a �.-s•��- - ' � � Seo�qe�own I _ a� Devils Rrvn ' , I . . •es :�rs`- - � 'c � .rnes�me Limesfonemduhy pmesro^e � � _ = .�.-: r,.. Neno epviv c � . . y !-s s Morl ond cloy � o a� , o a Weno equ;. sec�ionatading I � PURGATO�a£ ��. .. � •• M@�a-PowPoa' I ol limes�on• �`�.;e-'rew. ��—�-y ` a�on v��A� '�^'c Po Imla /940 f.hdiHe-MarW I� W I I � �-wv+vro• -z •: �- ew;r e-� a`, °' . �e�' � Denlon e u�. � �� — F r �j ( i I I Coddo in subsu�loor I i p `; o�; 3 a$ '✓vs os rn sn s cap lWe/p lo H�amichi � w. �� . ' y i I v� ..� o t� Ft Nbrth eqvr; •�' �" �'=h � _ i_k'ldkC/1 ' �k M�,,,� IimeSlOne 46 Q , � ' W FORMATIOh ' c � � • Fd� S�ock�on _ ,� ° o . ;� , 3 �_� ;� _ 'f�` q T , =�S � � 1 ondc l !. ' t o^+-^ c e) - a+ �� �.� 3 _ � � m� hi � W � � ALBIAN a . � - _ c • ' n'nes � 9 - � , � � � j ,, �- �/1 � � -".'a.ra �.coi�+c ; : - _ . e arc o.e ! � k � ' � g = ? _ � � � �� c �. .. = Y T:oq■zable) a tase � o � o Unk awr, ` . ! ',, , , I y _.l _esrocras o�aross,...11 a✓� o ,}� o Kiomichi clav . I , Eevoids _ Goa�O�o�+o _ Goodlanc G�land 600doea I I, � ,�M� limeslone . a I I � I I. m o = 3 -` � � , limesfone �'^'�+� I � � � � , c - . - University Mesa ' o. .. , O ?�N� oyipryn €„r „n�ryb�e �. , -- a o o� i a £d w a r C s E d w or ds Ea.ots �'ti.• �'Y .. l 1� sh c�Noy � I �' I w ; �a.a.ds clayol Adkrns . . ; „ o o, limes�o�e � ql limeslona , -'�sib�r :r^a^rhePeakk I ( W . . � � _ • Po1a05�a Polopscc � � < � I�I . I I �ormolion lormo�ro� I I I a3' ' (nol known Morrr = �, / � �il� . 7 +� c`. - t � s , - o E v I I43 on surloceJ �d�'�^ '� � o I v ALB/AN � 8E �-�a�-.,�vig o • � ` E �I �5.� ,�,+esJpM � � ; � E � � 1�C , Q a ! ;, _ Ga+nonChe FYok . - - � ;�y � s b�! cbY . . . . ` , , � ~ 4 �,�••�� ��� a ' i�mes�a+e ��' . :m�a�c�e�ls. m � Lomoncne I i �� Ctvnonche F�drls W = �c _ �rwhr� �' ' � � ` � ' - E ' i _-. s ' � WaMut clo ' Mwv _ . .. 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TVA :946 c3$' 1941 R4�����! 83� _ . ..._.___'____ .._-...._._.- -- __-- -_'_"__...____'_----._.-.... ._-- .""'._T_YA___ - ._._...____ ____._._. ...._..-.__. . 1958� ,� ___.---_-_"._... .___...- _._.....__ _...__- - ._____. ......_..""- _ . _... .._ ____ _._-- _..._._. ....-_.- _.. _.. ��Pr�9+G2- � JANUpRY -_ _ ........_-_._-__ . . _._..-___._ __._-. .-_ ._._. _ �. ._______ -____"._.._.._... __-- _'" ._-._. _ . 1 ADDxTIONAL INFORMATION CONCERNING THH PROGRESS OF MAPPING IN � . . Sc'�,e1o�6,2�i int: aoa-c�.owe�cni suevcr rvcre.�+ o c. ��r -�� TENNESSEE MAY BE OBTAINED FROM THE ATLANTiC REGION ENGINEER, U. S. . 1�-c- i _..-_ ��-_- - 10-- �-..-__ �� _ - ___._�oMles _ -.,BLISHED ATTHE � _ o �o_ _ � ao w ,wKilometers �-.� ov i:z5C,o0o GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, 1109 HIGHLANDST., ARLINGTON, VIRGINIA, OR THE MAP . . '�'�.Ne �no neSce�PnOrv1 INFORMATION OFFiCE, U. 5. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, WASHWGTON 25, D. C. . _ �r���____ �:._�- :-_r . . 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